• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse
1 of 2 < >

Event Announcements now available FREE to all registered users

We just reconfigured the Event Announcements forum to be available as a free service for all registered forum users. See the thread stuck at the top of that forum for more information.
2 of 2 < >

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

X Post: Achy hips: Dressage or hunt seat?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • X Post: Achy hips: Dressage or hunt seat?

    Cross-posting from Off Course:

    First, let me say that I ride in a dressage saddle, a Passier GG. I don't do anything fancy, just maybe first level riding. I am used to riding older horses, so mostly I just plunk around.

    In the past year, I have started dealing with achy hips. I have been diagnosed with bursitis, possible arthritis, I don't know but I'm seeing a doctor soon.

    Today I was noticing that when I took my feet out of the stirrups and let my leg hang down, I felt a pinching in my hip. But when I bent my knee, this relieved the pinching. What I want to know is if any of you have experienced anything similar, and would switching to a CC saddle or something with a more forward flap take the pressure off my hips so I can keep riding? I can't really shorten the stirrups any further on my Passier without having my knee go over the knee roll.

    Thanks for your input! (and thanks, Whicker)
    2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

    A helmet saved my life.

  • #2
    I would be interested in any advice on how to deal with hip bursitis; I was diagnosed with it recently and have started physical therapy. However, I can't ride now because I can't bend my right leg far enough to the right to sit in a saddle. It's very, very painful. So far the therapy doesn't seem to be helping much, but I just started 2 weeks ago....

    I used teh google and someone said that accupuncture helped with the hip bursitis, so I'm thinking of trying that.

    For some reason the muscles around my right hip joint are also very tight, so it's not just bursitis. I have no idea why I'm having this problem, though it might have been precipitated by an accident I had last fall--fell off of a horse, and dislocated my left elbow and hurt my lower back.

    Anyway, I don't have any answers yet but I can sure relate!
    Last edited by dontcallmepat; Apr. 20, 2010, 08:48 PM. Reason: typo

    Comment


    • #3
      Sidesaddle?

      You'll have a different stretch in the right hip, but wouldn't have to straddle the horse.

      Anyone near you have one you could try?
      ~ Horse Box Lovers Clique ~

      Comment


      • #4
        Hehe, now that's an idea! I have to admit, though, that I've never really liked the idea of riding sidesaddle. It just seems like it would be uncomfortable. Though I know I shouldn't knock it if I hadn't tried it.

        At least we did rule out arthritis. So theoretically it is a temporary condition.

        I still have hope that accupuncture or maybe a chiropractor can help.

        Sorry, I didn't mean to hijack your thread, THP! Anyone have any advice for the OP?

        Comment


        • #5
          Well I have arthritis from advanced chronic lyme disease, and I found that before I had to stop riding it caused me much less pain in all my joints to ride in my jumping saddle with shorter stirrups. Don't know if that helps you, but it sure made my hips feel better riding shorter then I did in my dressage saddle. Something about when my legs would stretch out it would feel like my hips were being ripped apart. I have also found that for joint pain, everywhere in my body, wearing the stretcher shape up shoes when I do things makes everything feel better.

          Comment


          • #6
            Don't try to stretch way down if the hips are starting to go....they just won't go there. Also, you probably need the support from the stirrup to keep weight off of whatever is sore.

            If you're going to SIT with shorter stirrups that's probably somewhat easier...but when I got really bad I couldn't 2 point to save myself, and I can't sit worth a damn with forward stirrups.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have some joint probs too and I really like the Piriformis stretch before riding. My hips have a hard time opening up, lengthning leg...so I have found doing the piriformis stretches realllllllly helps me. Piriformis are the Hip rotator muscles.

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Z6jl...eature=related


              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWfnAUsYUTI

              On really bad days I use a western saddle, which seems to help.

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                I am bumping this thread because a year later, I am still dealing with the bursitis but I have a new horse that I would hate to sell if I can't find a way to keep riding.

                I took the advice of many and upped the pain meds, so that helps a lot.

                I have done PT, and am now doing Pilates, which has really stabilized my hip joints and relieved pressure on them. I am sore the next day, but it still has made a huge difference.

                I started wearing cushier shoes and looser clothing. More to the point, I have done everything anyone advised me to do and these are some of the things that have relieved soreness.

                I also bought a new saddle, one that is much more padded and supportive. It fits me and my horse perfectly. However, I still wonder about the type of saddle. I still get sore from riding (less so than in my old saddle), but I want to continue three or four times a week. I am more sore if I canter a lot or sit the trot. I have also observed the close-to-if-not-80-year-old rider at the barn who goes happily around in her close contact saddle, posting trot or in 2 point.

                So, does anyone have any more insights or similar experiences they can share with me?

                dontcallmepat, any updates on your hip issues?
                Last edited by TheHorseProblem; Apr. 11, 2011, 03:17 PM.
                2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

                A helmet saved my life.

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you have hip issues riding, as you found out, you need to restrict the times you will be doing the kind of riding that stressed hips.
                  Don't do long stretches of sitting trot, keep changing to posting or walking.
                  Don't canter for long and if you are legging the horse, just don't sit in the saddle, try to stay out of it.

                  A bit shorter stirrups helps, too short also not good.

                  Mostly, take breaks here and there, if you can, get off and do other for a break, hand graze, walk around, longe a little, then get back on.

                  What hurts joints is repetitive motion, so don't do something like sitting trot for long, use interval training, with many changes.

                  That will also keep you more flexible.
                  Most western saddles do help, because there is more support there, as long as you also don't just do the same for very long.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                    If you have hip issues riding, as you found out, you need to restrict the times you will be doing the kind of riding that stressed hips.
                    Don't do long stretches of sitting trot, keep changing to posting or walking.
                    Don't canter for long and if you are legging the horse, just don't sit in the saddle, try to stay out of it.

                    A bit shorter stirrups helps, too short also not good.

                    Mostly, take breaks here and there, if you can, get off and do other for a break, hand graze, walk around, longe a little, then get back on.

                    What hurts joints is repetitive motion, so don't do something like sitting trot for long, use interval training, with many changes.

                    That will also keep you more flexible.
                    Most western saddles do help, because there is more support there, as long as you also don't just do the same for very long.
                    Thank you, Bluey. That is all good advice.

                    I think that all of this might mean that I am just not able to handle lessons anymore. My trainer notices how much more confident and assertive I was the last time, and that's true. I cantered so much more than usual, but paid a price for it with aching at night and not being able to sleep through it.

                    I also asked a friend if I could try riding in her close contact saddle, to see if that makes a difference.
                    2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

                    A helmet saved my life.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      for what it is worth--
                      I sent my saddle off the be re-paneled and was given a loaner which seemed quite comfortable at the time. It had a wider twist. I could hardly walk the next day.
                      A man must love a thing very much if he not only practices it without any hope of fame or money, but even practices it without any hope of doing it well.--G. K. Chesterton

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A client of mine has bad hips; she made the switch to a close contact (from a dressage) and shorter stirrups and it has helped her be comfortable riding.
                        Freeing worms from cans everywhere!

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Originally posted by Natalie A
                          Bumping this and have a slightly different problem trying to figure out what to do for saddles, choosing between a jumping saddle and a dressage saddle. For me it's a question of endurance and being able to trot for longer stretches of time without taking a break to stretch.

                          In theory, the jumping saddle that makes me work every fiber of my being (and wears me out quickly!) is best because it really gives me a great workout and strengthens everything... but what if I can do more now (i.e., trot for 10 minutes at a time like I used to be able to) in the new dressage saddle? Maybe for now it's better to ride in the more supportive saddle and get my endurance up. But it kind of feels like a cop out...
                          It shouldn't! Hey, whatever it takes to keep riding. Is there any reason why you must choose between one or the other. My trainer suggested that I alternate saddles.
                          2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

                          A helmet saved my life.

                          Comment

                          • Original Poster

                            #14
                            Originally posted by lizathenag View Post
                            for what it is worth--
                            I sent my saddle off the be re-paneled and was given a loaner which seemed quite comfortable at the time. It had a wider twist. I could hardly walk the next day.
                            Interesting. I theorize that I developed bursitis from riding bareback so often. It was just because my horse was lame. It didn't improve my seat any.
                            2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

                            A helmet saved my life.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have an achey right hip, but don't know why. Could be the start of some arthritis, or maybe soft tissue inflammation, I guess. When I first started riding at age 53, I had a lot of problems with sore hips and knees. I got the Sprenger 4-way stirrups, which were the only jointed stirrups at the time, and got rid of the soreness. I also invested in the Prestige leathers that are wrapped and stitched. This took the torque off my legs and made things a lot more comfortable.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                For hip bursitis, go to a doctor who's a DO (doctor of osteopathy)... either an ortho or a PCP. They can inject the joint which will probably help you a lot. A nurse where I work has bursitis in her hips and gets injections from one of the doctors periodically. She raves about how wonderful it is. She doesn't ride, but it would probably still be helpful.
                                Against My Better Judgement: A blog about my new FLF OTTB
                                Do not buy a Volkswagen. I did and I regret it.
                                VW sucks.

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  I get my hips injected like clockwork, every three months. I ice them every night, sometimes twice, and use a TENS unit. I do stretching and Pilates. All of these things help, but I think it's just chronic, and I need to learn how to live with it. The article in the new USDF magazine is really encouraging.

                                  There are two young women at the barn battling breast cancer. There are worse things than bursitis! You have all given me good ideas on how to extend my riding life.

                                  Bluey, I got off and walked mid-ride as you suggested. That was really helpful!
                                  Last edited by TheHorseProblem; May. 4, 2011, 01:17 PM. Reason: sp
                                  2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

                                  A helmet saved my life.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I ride endurance AND have rheumatoid arthritis, whats worked for me is a narrower horse, supportive saddle w/very wide padded stirrups. My mare is pretty hot, so no leg contact and minimal cues needed. When I switch to a wider and green filly who needs lots of contact, cues, I'm in agony afterwards. Maybe school for more lightness in your horse--I cluck instead of squeeze for example, and then use a crop as backup if I don't get a prompt "yes ma'am" Alternating sitting, posting and throwing in canter--keeping the joints moving really helps, sitting in one gait for too long is really hard for me, I'll actually get off on long rides and walk a few minutes to loosen the joints back up, stretching before and after the ride helps too
                                    Windwalker Ridge: Gaited horses, lessons, training, sales
                                    http://windwalkerridge.cloud11.net

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      update

                                      Last weekend I borrowed a friend's close contact saddle, and discovered that riding in a forward seat with a shorter stirrup does indeed take the pressure off my hips. I'm not cured of bursitis, that's for sure, but I could ride all three gaits and get a good night's sleep, not tormented with the burning in the hip sockets.

                                      I am buying a new saddle.
                                      2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

                                      A helmet saved my life.

                                      Comment

                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        update

                                        I am riding in the close contact saddle as much as I ever did, just riding in a half seat or two point when I need a break.

                                        I feel whole again.

                                        New saddle next week!
                                        Last edited by TheHorseProblem; May. 14, 2011, 05:10 PM. Reason: clarity
                                        2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

                                        A helmet saved my life.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X