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Update: it's Latent Auto Immune Diabetes in Adults, not Type 2 adult onset diabetes

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  • Update: it's Latent Auto Immune Diabetes in Adults, not Type 2 adult onset diabetes

    I recently found out that I may have Type 2 diabetes. It was quite a shock, as it doesn't run in my family, I am not overweight, maintain a good diet (lots of veggies, fruit, fish etc).
    Are there any special considerations as far as riding, being outside etc? I ride quite a lot, whip in at two hunts, do tons of farm chores. But I really know nothing about this,never having been around it.
    I plan to call my regular dr tomorrow for a follow up appt to verify this and get more info, but just wanted to pick everyone's brains here.
    Thanks!


    **at my most recent bloodwork it was discovered that I am positive for the antibodies for LADA (latent auto immune diabetes in adults). that figures.
    Last edited by Jaegermonster; Oct. 24, 2010, 03:47 PM.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin

  • #2
    My DH has had Type 2 for about 4 years. He doesn't ride (I bought 2 of our 4 horses *for him* ) but since I do, perhaps I can make some suggestions/observations. He is on a pretty low dose of insulin, by the way, and it does make a difference. He was on pills before.
    If you are out and about, definitely have some sort of high carb snack with you at all times. Low blood sugar is bad. DH tends to get grumpy and can fade fast. When out in the hunt field I imagine whatever is in your flask might be appropriate. Peach Snapps, etc???
    What suprprised me, and I did not know it until a client told me (I work with blind and visually impaired adults), is that when you are sick, it is almost impossible to control your blood sugar. It tends to stay pretty high.
    Be sure to eat at regular times and have snacks. Make sure you have regular eye exams. Diabetes can affect your vision but DH has had no, repeat no, problems yet.
    Find a book about diabetes that lists the glycemic index of foods. For example, pineapple, watermelon, graham crackers, and Italian bread are bad as far as their glycemic index goes.
    Pumpernickel (sp?) bread, peaches, plums are good.
    Just be aware when you are doing farm chores, out hunting, and busy.
    Check your blood sugar often. I hate needles, but DH has poked me with his lancet and it does not hurt at all. The new glucometers are very efficient and need just a tiny drop of blood.
    Take care and don't worry!
    Carol

    Comment


    • #3
      I've known folks who've been able to get entirely off insulin by really monitoring their diet. A good place to start is with Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution: The Complete Guide to Achieving Normal Blood Sugars . It's absolutely brilliant.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Thank you so much.
        I'm actually not on insulin, I'm not on anything yet.
        I just found about all this on Friday and have an appt with my regular doctor for follow up or whatever to get on top of this on Thursday. So far the popular opinion is this is the non insulin dependent kind and that i can take some kind of pill or whatever. There aren't any weight or diet issues that I need to change, I eat an extremely healthy diet, exercise, ride, etc so we'll have to see what happens. But I really hope I don't need to do the insulin thing, I'm very needle phobic.
        I will see if I can get that book and read up on things.
        "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin

        Comment


        • #5
          I have Type 1 (which is quite a different beast; it's *always* treated with insulin) ... but second the suggestions for frequent testing, eating on a regular schedule, and always always always carry a high-carb snack with you when you are riding.

          If you ever do end up on insulin -- and it doesn't sound to me like you will -- there is a recently approved nasal insulin spray, and injection devices that don't require a lot of dealing with needles.

          If you are started on meds --- be sure you work with your doctor to find one you tolerate well. Metformin, the most commonly prescribed med for Type 2 diabetes, gives some people horrible side effects, and doctors can be stubborn about changing meds.
          You have to have experiences to gain experience.

          1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Jaegermonster View Post
            I recently found out that I may have Type 2 diabetes. It was quite a shock, as it doesn't run in my family, I am not overweight, maintain a good diet (lots of veggies, fruit, fish etc).
            Are there any special considerations as far as riding, being outside etc? I ride quite a lot, whip in at two hunts, do tons of farm chores. But I really know nothing about this,never having been around it.
            I plan to call my regular dr tomorrow for a follow up appt to verify this and get more info, but just wanted to pick everyone's brains here.
            Thanks!
            Make sure that you are correctly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and that you do not in fact have Type 1 diabetes. A lot of times people (and MD's) assume since the diabetes is diagnosed as an adult that it is Type 2. Since you are not overweight and appear to have an active lifestyle this puts up red flags for me.

            Originally posted by quietann View Post
            If you ever do end up on insulin -- and it doesn't sound to me like you will -- there is a recently approved nasal insulin spray, and injection devices that don't require a lot of dealing with needles.
            The nasal insulin was pulled off the market a while back due to causing too many lung problems.

            Make sure that you get some diabetes education from a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE). Education is one of the main keys in maintaining good glycemic control. Sometimes you will have to really pester your MD to send you for education but it is very important.
            Richard, Approved Black KWPN Stallion
            Website
            and Facebook page
            Oh Kaptain Underpants SFS, Approved BRp pony stallion
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            Comment


            • #7
              Make sure that you get some diabetes education from a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE). Education is one of the main keys in maintaining good glycemic control. Sometimes you will have to really pester your MD to send you for education but it is very important.
              What she said. Because...

              I am going to VEHEMENTLY disagree with 'carry a high carb snack.'

              I am going to VEHEMENTLY *agree* with the Dr. Bernstein book. Get it and you'll understand my first line. It's in most libraries.

              Most Docs are NOT up to speed on the latest dietary recommendations, unless they are Endos. I prefer the Endo to the CDE... but at least they're going to be on the same page these days.

              I am diabetic. Lost 50lbs and THEN was diagnosed. Have 30 more to go (closer to 40 at this moment, but I digress.)

              I achieve tight control via diet. Low carb, high fiber, high protein. I could definitely do better with excercise, but with the farm, and six flights of stairs at work where I do at least 3 sets of rounds on those stairs--and am discouraged from using the elevator by the nature of the job... sometimes I'm just plain stubborn and don't want to *have* to work out more.

              I'd be interested in what you consider is a 'good' or 'healthy' diet. Not saying it's not, but for Insulin resistance or Type 2 or SyndromeX, management without needles can mean your total carbs for the day come in around 20-30 grams... or less than 15 per meal. You do get to subtract fiber from total carbs.

              Fruit is super "healthy" according to just about everyone, expert, Doc etc.--and will kill me or make me blind eventually. Post-prandials after fruit are in the 250+ range. Even most 'low glycemic' fruits. I could only eat fruit when on Byetta, which was a miracle drug for me, but my insurance doesn't cover it any more.

              Whole grains--another 'healthy' food... only some of them, and only in very limited amounts. Brown rice? Beans? Only certain kinds. White Kidney or cannelli beans are good--lentils are bad.

              You get the idea.

              Snacks: Nuts are one of the best, a good hunk o' meat... be it chook or steak or sugar-free jerky, a hard boiled egg... Unless someone like me is in true hypoglycemic crisis, never, ever juice or a piece of fruit or candy... that's more about the Type I folks having dives... You want to keep your levels even all day.

              With tight control, my BG is consistently around 80 fasting and 90 Post-Prandial. For *me* I know I'm getting into trouble when my morning fasting #s start climbing--which they do.

              There's a lot to it in some ways... in other ways, as horse people, we're usually used to managing diet for performance, and it's no more difficult than that. My horse and I both share the EPSM Diet mostly.

              You might find that managing cold becomes problematic. You might not. For me muscle control and tone is dramatically affected by how well I'm managing. I couldn't ride my way out of a bag before Byetta. Now I'm managing with strict diet alone, and still feel as good, strong and balanced as I did on the Rx... *most* of the time. Somtimes when it all goes wonky and nothing feels right, I remember to test my BG and it's screwed up. <shrugs>

              It's a little scary when you first get the diagnosis. For awhile it feels so... Big. But we know so much more about management. We've come SO far even in the last 5 years. It's a good time to be Diabetic, if that makes sense.
              InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)

              Comment


              • #8
                Well in the spring three yrs ago I was diagnosed with type 2. Yes, I am/was overweight. Get plenty of exercise though, most days I walk several miles and a few inside the house as well.

                My readings were in teh 500 + range to begin with. I have now lost 70 lbs, I take Metformin and Glimeperide and they are thinking of adding a third by spring. Right now my readings are in the 200 range. My A1C is 8 down from 12. So as long as weight keeps going down as well as readings and the A1C they just want me to keep going as I am.

                I don't have choice in what I eat many times. You eat what is here or don't, plain and simple. I do the best I can with that though. I have never been one to even like sweet stuff, until this came about of course, and now find it very hard to not have that kind of thing. And yes, I was also told, NO candy, sweets of any kind, maybe an apple once in a while but most fruit is not good to eat they say. I also agree that the quick high carb snack is for the insulin dependent diabetics.

                I would love to have an appt with a endo or dietician but if I get in a car and go anywhere I am laid up for days and days and sometimes even longer. IT may well get the best of me in teh end but I can only do what I can do.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have Type 2 diabetes

                  [FONT=Times New Roman][SIZE=3]The message that I’m getting from this thread is that every diabetic is different and you can’t generalize. I won’t disagree with anything that has been said regarding diet or anything else but some of my experiences have been very different.[/SIZE][/FONT]
                  [FONT=Times New Roman][/FONT]
                  [FONT=Times New Roman][SIZE=3]I was diagnosed with Type 2 a little over 2 years ago and I’m not overweight. You don’t have to be overweight to have Type 2 diabetes. Research has shown that issues like sleep deprivation and steroids (like prednisone) play a part in developing Type 2 diabetes. There may also be a genetic factor. I was pretty sick when I was diagnosed. My blood sugar was near 400, I had started having blurred vision, my liver numbers were crazy, I had a systemic infection and sugar had started spilling into my urine. I’m being very specific because a few “well meaning” acquaintances have informed me that I must have only been pre-diabetic. Sorry – definitely not the case. [/SIZE][/FONT]
                  [FONT=Times New Roman][/FONT]
                  [FONT=Times New Roman][SIZE=3]As far as diet goes, I didn’t make any gradual changes. I immediately gave up Pepsi (my one real vice), I also gave up anything “refined” – white sugar, white bread, white rice and regular pasta. I mostly eat fish, chicken and turkey. I eat red meat occasionally but only the leanest (most expensive) cuts. I eat lots of veggies and lots of fruit. I love pineapple. I also eat 1 or 2 small pieces of dark chocolate every day. What I don’t do is eat “naked” carbs. Any time that I eat fruit (or veggies) I pair it with a healthy fat like a dozen almonds or some lean protein. That slows down the absorption of the sugar from the fruit and avoids the sugar spike. I can only say that it works for me and my doctor approves. [/SIZE][/FONT]
                  [FONT=Times New Roman][/FONT]
                  [FONT=Times New Roman][SIZE=3]I agree that finding the right medication for you is key and it can take some trial and error. Because of my liver involvement we were limited in the medications that could be used. I started with Januvia – one of the newer drugs. One of the side effects was a sore throat which was kind of strange – I never knew if I was getting sick or if it was the Januvia. The upset stomach was rough the first couple of weeks but then it was only a problem maybe 1 or 2 days every couple of months. Originally my doctor was going to switch me to Metformin when my liver counts improved, but he was so pleased with my response that I stayed on Januvia for the first year. I started taking Metformin last December and did find that I had an upset stomach almost daily but, again, it was only severe enough to affect my activities the first few weeks.[/SIZE][/FONT]
                  [FONT=Times New Roman][/FONT]
                  [FONT=Times New Roman][SIZE=3]This may be shocking to some, but I have never tested my blood – I don’t even own a meter. That was my doctor’s decision, and it confused me because I thought all diabetics had to test so I asked him why he didn’t want me to. He told me that insulin and certain medications could cause sugar spikes and crashes and those patients do need to test. Since Januvia and Metformin don’t have that side effect I didn’t need to. He wanted me to be more focused on behaviors rather than a number. Again, that approach has worked with me but I’m not suggesting anyone else try it. I have been off of all medication since the end of February. My last A1C was 5.9. My blood sugar, when lab tested or before a few surgical procedures has ranged from 98-112. I know that I’ll always have to watch my diet and while I appear to be completely healthy now, I’m not cured. I can do all the right things but it may be a balancing act and I may, from time to time, need to go back on medication. I also agree that if someone has to have diabetes, this is a good time to have it. [/SIZE][/FONT]

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well as a type 2 diabetic you should not be on insulin yet but if it does come to that the needles now days are tiny 26guage. There are some techniques also to make the finger sticks less painful.

                    Try if you can to get an appointment with a diabetes education nurse.

                    The previous poster is correct that when you are ill that your blood sugar is harder to control. Even non insulin dependent diabetic patients usually have a sliding scale insulin order when admitted for that reason. It is upsetting to some patients when not explained to them properly as they believe once they start insulin they will be on it forever.

                    The American Diabetic Association website has a great interactive website for planning your diet.

                    Take care
                    http://equestriansewing.blogspot.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      How about this!?

                      Been there done that! Often Type 2 first manifests itself as insulin resistance. You feel washed out and lack energy because your body is kind of allergic to your own insulin. You're making plenty but you aren't burning sugar so.....Metformin does the trick. I have a normal A1C but am on it because it prevents me from being hungry all the time, allows my body to utilize my sugar correctly and smooths out my BS. It makes things work right.
                      But for hunting? Make SURE you are well hydrated before & after. You'll have to plan your pre-hunting meals better. I ate on the way to the meet.
                      High protein meal w/high fiber before hunting lasts longer. Egg/cheese sandwich on high fiber toast for example. Avoid alcohol . Avoid simple sugared foods. Go with how you are feeling. Don't wait until you are dizzy/weak to go in. Experiment with what time of day you take your metformin or other med. Explain to doc your schedule and ask his suggestion. Best suggestion? Find a good dietician who specializes in diabetic counseling and ask her advice. That's invaluable!
                      Hunt on my friend!

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        I totally agree with the poster who said that it's a little scary at first. I felt very overwhelmed, having been fortunate enough to have always been healthy and now wham!

                        Susie, when they did the urine test at the wellness thing (at 1 pm after not eating or drinking since 11 pm the night before) my glucose was 500. They wanted to call rescue but I wouldn't let them since i felt fine. Plus my fasting blood from two weeks before also had really high sugar.

                        Had the dr appt this past thursday, she gave me a meter and I have to check my blood 2x a day, more if I can, and then come back in two weeks. So far it's been much higher than what she said it should be first thing in the morning and in the evenings I'm getting all kinds of weird readings.

                        I've been keeping a food diary for the last year for other reasons, the doctor looked at it and said the only problem she can see at this point is my Diet Coke habit, which isn't really that bad (one in the am and one at lunch, I don't drink coffee). As far as weight, I'm almost 5'8" and weigh 153.
                        She did seem to think that at the end of the two weeks if I need meds it will most likely be a pill depending on what the meter says.

                        There is a diabetes counseler or something (exactly what she called it escapes me) that she said she would give me a referral to next time I come in if I need it so I"ll probably get that.
                        So that's where we stand, I'm still a little overwhelmed but trying to get as much info as I can.
                        Thanks everybody, this has been some good info so far.
                        "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Jaegermonster View Post
                          I totally agree with the poster who said that it's a little scary at first. I felt very overwhelmed, having been fortunate enough to have always been healthy and now wham!

                          Susie, when they did the urine test at the wellness thing (at 1 pm after not eating or drinking since 11 pm the night before) my glucose was 500. They wanted to call rescue but I wouldn't let them since i felt fine. Plus my fasting blood from two weeks before also had really high sugar.

                          Had the dr appt this past thursday, she gave me a meter and I have to check my blood 2x a day, more if I can, and then come back in two weeks. So far it's been much higher than what she said it should be first thing in the morning and in the evenings I'm getting all kinds of weird readings.

                          I've been keeping a food diary for the last year for other reasons, the doctor looked at it and said the only problem she can see at this point is my Diet Coke habit, which isn't really that bad (one in the am and one at lunch, I don't drink coffee). As far as weight, I'm almost 5'8" and weigh 153.
                          She did seem to think that at the end of the two weeks if I need meds it will most likely be a pill depending on what the meter says.

                          There is a diabetes counseler or something (exactly what she called it escapes me) that she said she would give me a referral to next time I come in if I need it so I"ll probably get that.
                          So that's where we stand, I'm still a little overwhelmed but trying to get as much info as I can.
                          Thanks everybody, this has been some good info so far.
                          It is so weird to me how one doctor will say one thing to one person and another something completely different to someone else. You would think there would be more set standards of treating this.

                          When I was diagnosed my bs readings were also 500+ and it was one month before I was leaving for two weeks in Bolivia to see my daughter. They said they didn't want to start me on any meds until I returned. Said I had likely been this way for a while and that most ppl have it for 5 yrs before being diagnosed. They did give me a meter and asked me to keep track. I asked when I should become concerned, as in when my numbers reach what point should I do something and what. I knew that medical things in Bolivia were not the best. They wouildn't answer me with such info. I was afraid I'd get down there and it would go to 700 or something and I'd be in big trouble. I went and was okay. Three yrs now later I am still in the 200 range. Metformin alone made NO difference at all. Matter of fact they say my biggest issue is stress and that stress alone can bring on diabetes. I have to wonder if that isn't hte case. If I go to my stepsisters down south my bs drops to 120 within two days. Soon as I get back up it goes. They say stress hormones like cortisol can be the whole problem. I don't know. I know weight loss seems to have helped as well. It got down to the 200 range through that. IT has not gotten one bit lower since they added the glimeperide.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ask your Doctor to send you to a Joslin Diabetes Center, their education is wonderful.

                            http://www.joslin.org/

                            Good luck!
                            FMO:OMG I almost put my eye out hunting clique.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My diabetic friends as well as my weight watcher friends swear by the Orowheat Sandwich Thins - no high fructose corn syrup. They are delicious !
                              Zu Zu Bailey " IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE ! "

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes last year, out of the blue, after two years diet/exercise to loose weight (which I had done).

                                I was put on tablets and it hasn't affected my life at all, I bought my horse this year and am able to eat a "normal" diet...
                                Where in this wide world can man find nobility without pride, friendship without envy, or beauty without vanity? - The horse. (R.Duncan)

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Waning moon, that is very interesting. My doctor just wanted to be sure what was going on and have sort of a baseline before she started me on any meds and also to see if there were any triggers or anything like that.

                                  I'm not on any meds now, just checking my blood 2x a day, but I guess if something weird does happen at least I'm in the US
                                  I didn't know that about the stress maybe bringing it on, but that's something else for me to keep track of on my little log.
                                  "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I am hypoglycemic, and before a brain injury it was pretty bad. I didn't eat an unhealthy diet, but I did eat a good amount of pasta, bread, and the occasional dessert.

                                    Some people are just wired to have issues processing sugar/carbs. If you have been like this for a while, and you are used to eating "healthy" food that really consists of a lot of carbs you may not even know about, it may have been something that has been brewing your whole life.

                                    What I am saying is that if your body has trouble with sugars, and maybe you were undiagnosed hypoglycemic in your younger years, your body may have over time become diabetic. I was told that uncontrolled hypoglycemia will eventually lead to diabetes. Is it possible that this may have happened with you.

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      You know, for a long time I have had issues with getting a little weak and shaky if I don't make sure to eat something regularly. I had talked to my doctors about it but they never did anything. I wonder if that's related somehow.
                                      Although I don't eat much pasta or bread. I don't remember the last time I had pasta, and I had a ham sandwich today but it was on one of those sandwich thin things so not much bread.
                                      "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Im in the same boat. Type 2 here, and healthy, (was untill the past few motnhs, under weight a bit). I was diagnosed as a 12yo (21 now), but had the symptoms since I was 8. Im able to manage it by diet, for the most part. Lots of meat, dairy, little carbs.
                                        I have snacks on me at ALL TIMES. I put them in the barn, in various trailers, my truck, my purse, friends cars, ringside totes, grooms pockets, golf cart...worst ever is to be with out food. I like the hard crunchy granola bars. They are kind of high calorie, but low surgar/carb compared to the protien. I feel like they have just enough simple sugar to raise my BS if im going down hill fast, but I dont get the horrible rebound other "energy bars" and the like do.
                                        Avoid sodas (duh!). I too like the sandwhich thins, they are delish! Avoid things listed as low carb, fat free, sugar free. Just choose better for you foods.
                                        Keep hydrated (water is always best for you any ways), dont skip meals, add smaller ones if you can.
                                        Good luck, once you have low BS episodes a few times, you will not forget to eat!
                                        PM me with any questions!
                                        ---^v---^v---^v----------------------^v---^v---^v---
                                        For a moment there, you bored me to death

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