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Medical ID Bracelet?

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  • Medical ID Bracelet?

    Hi all!

    I have a question about IF you wear a med ID bracelet, and if you do, which one do you have that withstands the barn? I have one from Lauren's Hope, but it's not a very good barn bracelet. I was thinking maybe a necklace instead? I'm on blood thinners (more than likely for life, I had a massive saddle embolism, and two clots in my leg) amongst other health issues that need to be available in case of an emergency.

    I have heard of Road ID but not known anyone with experience.

    Also, what do you have on yours? What are the most important things to put on there?

    I have POTS, an AVM that transverses my left femur bone, lifer on thinners... I would like to find one that I could fit those three on, as they're the most important.

    SO, necklace? or some waterproof bracelet...


  • #2
    I have the Road ID-- mine is basically just a silicon bracelet with a metal plate but they havbe a bunch of different options. It has an online option to store information (with a PIN for first responders/ medical personnel to use) plus whatever you put on the plate itself. You can also add additional plates if you need more information. I wear it pretty much all the time and it's super easy. I don't have any major issues so I just have my name and year of birth and emergency contact info. They are very popular with runners and I've had good experiences with customer service.

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    • #3
      I have had many medical bracelets. This is the last one I am still wearing, still in good shape after 2 years. You pick and choose what info "charm" blocks you need to add to it. Easily sized by removing a link or two. Cheap enough that you can order different colors....
      https://www.ebay.com/itm/Taking-Coum...4AAOSw9N5bEdbf

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      • #4
        I have a road id. You can get a bracelet, dog tag, or what have you. When you call the phone number a real live person answers. You can put all kinds of information on file which can be conveyed to emergency responder (your doctor, allergies, what meds you are on, whom to notify if you are incapacitated etc etc).

        https://www.roadid.com

        actually I guess they aren't making the dog tag ones anymore. However, you can always have the info engraved on a dog tag from a third party.

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        • #5
          I wear a silicon bracelet from Stickymedical it has an engraveable plate and is almost weightless

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          • #6
            I wear a RoadID bracelet. It has a Medical Alert badge My husbands phone number, that I had Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy and my surgeon's 800 number. Mine is the silicone band. I periodically change the band color. It is very comfortable.
            Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)

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            • #7
              I have a list of medical conditions and wear a id bracelet as well. I have always used medicalert.org. Having worked in EMS and also needing to wear a bracelet myself, I find there's to be classic, clearly recognized by emergency personnel, durable, and can fit a decent amount of information. I personally have always worn the Classic Embossed Bracelet. What I have on my bracelet is Seizures, Dysautonomia, Gastroparesis, CRPS, No Amoxicillin.

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              • #8
                I use the Road ID Apple Watch plate. I also have a fabric band with metal plate from them too, but I prefer the watch plate so I only have one thing on my wrist(s). It seems to hold up pretty well and I think it's pretty obvious if medical personnel are treating me while I am unconscious.

                Mine has my name, birth year, ICE name & phone number, and the medical abbreviations for no penicillin or sulfa drugs and low cholinesterase plus a reference to a phone number & website medical personnel can contact for additional information such as medical history.

                This meets the needs for wearing medical information for the cross country phase of eventing, so I never have to worry about something extra at a show.

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                • #9
                  Honestly as much as road ID and those memberships are considered good, as a paramedic it makes no difference to us. In the even of an emergency I am never going to be calling your subscriber for info about you, just no time for that. I will be referring to what is on your bracelet.

                  Important things are things like the blood thinners, heart conditions, diabetes, allergies. Generally speaking the more you can fit the better, but you need to start off with the critical things first.

                  I would stay away from cookie cutter online stores or customs only shops that make products that may not be as durable. Drugs stores sell products, your local medical supplies shop(ebay as seen above can even have great products).
                  http://www.akcanadianhorses.ca/blog

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                  • #10
                    AKCH, as a paramedic (love the real life feedback), what bracelets/necklaces (do you prefer one over the other) do you like that you look for, have enough space for needed information, and are durable?
                    When you start to observe, you become more effective... your movements soften, you see more, you are more available to becoming a team member. Be an Observer first, a Handler second.

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                    • #11
                      Bracelets are usually the most identifiable medic alerts and necklaces as a close second. Anything that is clearly identified with a star of life is what will help us. Ideally anything with a star of life to make it obvious what that piece of jewellery is the best. Good quality bracelets that will survive the test of time and horses, tend to also be ones that are more plain. The general female population I think would agree that they want something that is more feminine and perhaps more elegant-most of the female population does not spend time around 1200 lbs animals either.
                      http://www.akcanadianhorses.ca/blog

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                      • #12
                        Thank you AKCH
                        When you start to observe, you become more effective... your movements soften, you see more, you are more available to becoming a team member. Be an Observer first, a Handler second.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          What medical conditions require a medical alert bracelet?

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                          • #14
                            I've been wearing a MedicAleet bracelet for years. The basic stainless steel one was my preferred as nothing will destroy it. Now I wear a leather band with the icon on it. I think bracelets are most common. You can also get a nylon bracelet that velcros on. I would like that for the barn.

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                            • #15
                              I now wear a Medic Alert bracelet, looks like a Pandora bracelet and is standing up well to wearing it non stop and for riding. I wear on the advice of my plastic surgeon who also specializes in lymphedema, as he advises “do everything to try to avoid getting it “ as I’ve had lymph nodes removed and if I’m knocked out riding, I won’t be able to let the paramedics know, no IV or needles in my left arm (apparently BP cuffs are now ok, although my bracelet also says no BP left arm as well as no needle sticks. It also advises I have asthma.

                              This is my bracelet (the alert charm can come off, so if I want I can put it on a different bracelet etc) I do pay medic alert Canada a membership fee, so that drs, paramedics etc can access everything, including my implant info, medications etc ! I also carry an ID card.
                              Attached Files
                              Breast cancer survivor!

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                              • #16
                                Another +1 for RoadID. I have a trio of autoimmune conditions, none of which would be directly affected by emergency care, but all of which I'd prefer attending physicians know about if I get admitted to a hospital (I'm on some odd drugs and have some allergies, too). It also includes my emergency contact info and has a line about "for medical information call X" so people know there's something to check. I figure it's better than nothing at all.

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                                • #17
                                  Son wears a MedicAlert bracelet (two mechanical heart valves, Coumadin, RBKA). He is HARD on everything, and it still going strong after five years. His band is the woven ripcord option.
                                  Last edited by pegasusmom; Dec. 28, 2019, 09:53 AM. Reason: more info
                                  www.amiddle-agedmadwomantakesthereins.blogspot.com

                                  www.pegasusridge.com

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                                  • #18
                                    I wear a ROADID

                                    Line one is my first and last name
                                    Line two is "MOM" and her phone number
                                    Line three is "Lumbar Injury" from an old XC accident that caused problems
                                    Line four is "Narcolepsy" so no one gives me narcan
                                    Line five is "NKDA" in case I can't answer questions immediately

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                                    • #19
                                      I use a MedicAlert bracelet as well. It's a plain basic titanium one with a big red emblem and medical highlights on the back. It survives barn life very well, it's light. It also wasn't too too expensive.

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                                      • #20
                                        Road ID here as well. In my extended break from the equestrian world I picked up running. I've worn an anklet since 2012-ish. Many of my friends have the silicon or fabric bracelets. Info on the plate: Name, birth year, city(I race out of state much of the time), couple of emergency contacts, med allergy, heart arrhythmia/asthma.

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