• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Grade 3 Osteoarthritis in Knee & Riding?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Grade 3 Osteoarthritis in Knee & Riding?

    Hey Everyone!

    I figured I would venture this way and put up a post to see how others with osteoarthritis ride.

    History:
    I'm a 24 yr old former rider who has grade 3 osteoarthritis in my knee from a riding accident in 2005. I blew out my PCL & PLC after I was kicked by another horse during a competition (like in the ring showing ;-) ) I had surgery in 05 and had massive problems post surgery. I'm now at another doc who is amazing but there is basically nothing to be done for me. I stopped riding 2 years ago because I couldn't "trust" my leg anymore to stay where it needed to and I was mentally a wreck also. I've had a scope in '07 where it was found that my knee was a mess. Since then I've battled with pain problems and have tried everything to help. I'm on Celebrex as needed, Lidocaine patches, and Voltaren Gel. I've had Synvisc & Supartez shots and a cortisone shot. Nothing helped :-( The talk of a replacement has come up but we all want to wait until I am at least 30 and hopefully longer.

    I rode for 16 years (Hunters & Equitation) and it is what I wanted to do with my life. After I stopped riding (during college) I went on to get another Bachelor's and am now finishing up my Masters and am looking for a big girl job. I worked for a while after I stopped riding at an equine hospital so I was still around horses and I live in Kentucky so they are everywhere. I moved to Europe for my Masters and was only around horses occasionally and I missed it terribly. The horse I used to lease is up for retirement and I am planning on taking him once I get settled into a job (need the money first!). It has gotten me thinking about riding again.

    Unfortunately I can't put the pressure on my knee to ride like I used to. The horse I will be getting is having some issues also (almost foundered) and will need to be ridden more than I can possibly handle (I will get a rider for him).

    How do those with severe knee issues ride? Do you feel like you have support from your leg? Is there something you tried that helped?

    I tried riding with a brace after surgery but it made me feel less secure. I heard of people who have loved the flex stirrups. I tried them before my knee surgery and it made me feel very unsecure especially over fences. Does anyone else have this problem?

    Sorry for the slight rambling, I feel like that is my life now ;-) Just wanted to see what others were doing!
    "The horse you get off f is not the same horse you got on. It is your job as a rider to ensure that as often as possible, the change is for the better" - unknown author

  • #2
    General suggestions......

    And these are only general based on my experience treating like patients......

    Focused off horse strengthening program
    Single leg Straight knee heel raise
    Isometric Quads
    "Dead lifts" to teach you how to increase hip function.
    Bent knee side plank for hip abductors.
    MAYBE closed chain abduction/adduction

    Ride without stirrups, period.

    Lots of work in front of you. Best of luck and hope your knee holds out until 30!

    REgards
    Medical Mike
    equestrian medical researcher
    www.equicision.com

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Thanks Mike!! I'm in PT right now working on leg strengthening if this doesn't work then in August/Sept we're going to scope and clean my knee again. Unfortunately my quad has never been the same since my first surgery :-( I had major issues post surgery and my left quad is significantly weaker than my right even with quad strengthening exercises.

      I'm assuming since no one else responded no one with Osteoarthritis rides? What a bummer :-(
      "The horse you get off f is not the same horse you got on. It is your job as a rider to ensure that as often as possible, the change is for the better" - unknown author

      Comment


      • #4
        OA and riders are not uncommon.......

        Just that there is not much to do beyond stated.

        Best of luck,
        Medical Mike
        equestrian medical researcher
        www.equicision.com

        Comment


        • #5
          alternative approach- stem cell

          Have you looked into stem cell procedures? I know that they are regenerating tissue in knees, now. My stem cell guru has done wonders on my back.
          Intermediate Riding Skills

          Comment


          • #6
            I have level 3 arthritis in both knees, I am on similar meds but my PT is compounded by previous stress and compression fractures to my back. I have opted out of surgery for the moment because for a while at least I would be in a wheel chair and at 24 I cannot accept that.

            I ride 5x a week. I have a TBx and we trail, do dressage, and we are starting to event. Yes it hurts, for me there is no worry of compensating b/c both sides are bad. What I find is esp. after jumping I need to ride w/o stirrups. And the stronger my core is the better my legs feel. I hate the feeling of joined stirrups but recently have learned of a brand that has a larger foot pad and is gel cushioned to absorb impact. I will post a link later. I want to get a pair and see if they help. I also NEVER get on from the ground - I will climb the larger xc fences if I have to get back on while on course and schooling, my horse is 16.3 and for me thats not going to happen. I also compensate by keeping most of my other work outs as low impact as possible. I am also trying to loose 30 lbs - have taken off 18 so far and the difference is AMAZING!!!

            My horse is also VERY light in the bridle - I probably could not ride a leaner or puller. If you want to do it, it can be done, not without pain and sacrifice, but it can be done. I think it is great that you posted as I dont know, personally, of anyone else that is attempting to ride competitively that has similar issues.

            I also get off and hand walk my cool downs no matter how stiff and in pain I am b/c if I don't I will be in too much pain at the end of the day. I think the biggest thing is to know your body - I am going on a 3-4 hour trail ride on Sat - I am going in my dressage saddle and I have lots of anti-inflammatory with me. But I know hoe my body will respond to that so I know how to prepare and decompress afterward.
            Dutch Harbor 2000 TB gelding
            Unagi 2010 QH gelding
            Cecil Batholomule 2015 Appy Mule
            http://dutchrunfarm.blogspot.com/

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Thanks for the info Moukoyui! Good to know that people can still ride with this. :-) Now this fall the struggle will begin to get back into some sort of riding shape!!!

              I hope those new stirrups work for you. Let me know!
              "The horse you get off f is not the same horse you got on. It is your job as a rider to ensure that as often as possible, the change is for the better" - unknown author

              Comment


              • #8
                Are these stirrups ones that are used for endurance? The endurance ones are the widest and most cushioned that I have seen. I'm interested in anything that will help with foxhunting this Fall.
                Intermediate Riding Skills

                Comment


                • #9
                  If your knee just can't support riding, have you thought about driving? I thought I was going to have to give up horses altogether due to rheumatoid arthritis (knees, feet, ankles, hands, shoulders, elbows--you name the joint, it probably hurts!). I was hitting the dirt regularly because my poor battered body just would not cooperate.

                  I took up driving and have a wonderful time with my horses. And just as with riding, you can be as competitive as you want.

                  Rebecca

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    I've driven Saddlebreds in pleasure driving. I didn't like that very much.

                    I am interested in combined driving but right now I have no extra money to take the lessons. I'm interested in riding again because I am getting a horse this fall whom I do not think would handle a cart very well....he scares himself pretty easy! :-)
                    "The horse you get off f is not the same horse you got on. It is your job as a rider to ensure that as often as possible, the change is for the better" - unknown author

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Should I ride with osteoarthritis?

                      I am a 46 year-old who has about three consecutive years of riding experience. I used to ride 1-2x per week, beginning dressage and some jumping over relatively small jumps. I am still a beginner. Maybe I'll always be a beginner for that matter. Nevertheless, there is something about the whole experience that I just love. I truly respect and love horses and the people who work with them. My issue is that I have not ridden for about two years due to pain from what I was told by my doctor was osteoarthritis, despite my x-rays coming back as normal. I have also had a significant weight gain, which I know is bad. Before I had physical therapy, the pain was so bad in my knees that one of them gave out (not on a horse, thankfully, but on the ground). I would love to be able to continue my journey as an equestrian and work on increasing my skill level - but I too have wondered if and how someone should ride with osteoarthritis. My doctors and physical therapists always say it is okay to ride, but I know they are not equestrians and probably believe that all you do on a horse is just sit atop of them. Obviously, even high-level riders have a certain amount of repetitive bouncing when riding, and the effects of riding on a rider's pain depends on the smoothness of the horse's gaits, as well as the duration and type of riding. And, even if you are a beginner, the pain could be a safety concern as it could prevent you from staying in proper form. One of my biggest concerns is the inevitable fall. More trauma on arthritic bones and joints is never good. I don't know - what do you think? The whole equestrian thing is so difficult to give up. I get so attached to the horses - even if they are school horses. Sorry for the rambling, but I would love to discuss this issue with people who are actually equestrians. As I mentioned before, I am a beginner, but not a layperson. I know enough to know that there is a lot that I don't know - if that makes sense, and that my doctor's advice may not be informed advice because they are not equestrians. People always mention driving - that would be fun to learn, I think. But, it is not the same as riding. Any suggestions or thoughts?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I believe Celebrex should be taken every day, not "as needed" because it takes some time to build up it's effectiveness. It didn't help me at all, but I do take daily anti-inflammatories and have had 3 knee replacements so far (I'm anatomically gifted). You can get "Cloud stirrups" which provide a much wider footbed and makes riding a lot easier. Work on strengthening your quads. Also, ice packs are your best friend, and put them on your knees whenever you can --- at night, when you get home from work or riding, etc. Acupuncture can help. And you may need to change your riding style for at least the time being, or maybe if you're into riding idiots, ride quieter horses. :-) You really don't want to fall and mess up your knees any worse!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Not getting any younger myself....

                          ....so goes the osteoarthitis. I do not ever recall a time the knees did not complain. Not to mention other parts. Tho I suffer not as badly as you.

                          I do not know what I'll ever do without my Ariat Terrians. Gosh do they save my mobility. My Redwing loggers are just as wonderful, but way too much boot to use daily or riding. Summers that have hard dry ground like this one are the worst (quick call the farrier she needs shock pads). I avoid just about any other pair of shoes or boots I own for any length of time. My knees tell me about it in the evenings if I digress and wear trendier shoes.

                          I trail ride. And long rides sometimes.....very long. I get off sometimes and walk. Sometimes I drop stirrups. Tho I am a western rider I actually prefer Arabs and Morgans to stock types. I can easily use a post variation and keep those knees working a bit. Much better than sitting there for lengthy periods of time and enduring a trot with my legs stiff....stiffer...even stiffer still.

                          A few decades ago when I was carrying my son I gained a mere 22lbs total. The knees screamed after the 1st 15lbs. So I do my best as I age to keep the waistline in check. That gets harder with age!

                          Every once in a while (just like now) I truly do not hurt anywhere. It is very nice. Much of the time when I do hurt I can ignore it and keep moving. A great doctor is the best advice. And always in the back of my mind are my grandmothers words. She said to me once if you are hurting then at least you know you are still alive.

                          Oh and one last thing....I seem to like shorter horses these days. What was I thinking a decade ago with those 16 plus hand horses??!!?!! 14.3 to 15.1 works for me! And in my old age I told the hubby I want a 13.2 hd sturdy pony.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by D Taylor View Post
                            ....so goes the osteoarthitis. I do not ever recall a time the knees did not complain. Not to mention other parts. Tho I suffer not as badly as you.

                            I do not know what I'll ever do without my Ariat Terrians. Gosh do they save my mobility. My Redwing loggers are just as wonderful, but way too much boot to use daily or riding. Summers that have hard dry ground like this one are the worst (quick call the farrier she needs shock pads). I avoid just about any other pair of shoes or boots I own for any length of time. My knees tell me about it in the evenings if I digress and wear trendier shoes.

                            I trail ride. And long rides sometimes.....very long. I get off sometimes and walk. Sometimes I drop stirrups. Tho I am a western rider I actually prefer Arabs and Morgans to stock types. I can easily use a post variation and keep those knees working a bit. Much better than sitting there for lengthy periods of time and enduring a trot with my legs stiff....stiffer...even stiffer still.

                            A few decades ago when I was carrying my son I gained a mere 22lbs total. The knees screamed after the 1st 15lbs. So I do my best as I age to keep the waistline in check. That gets harder with age!

                            Every once in a while (just like now) I truly do not hurt anywhere. It is very nice. Much of the time when I do hurt I can ignore it and keep moving. A great doctor is the best advice. And always in the back of my mind are my grandmothers words. She said to me once if you are hurting then at least you know you are still alive.

                            Oh and one last thing....I seem to like shorter horses these days. What was I thinking a decade ago with those 16 plus hand horses??!!?!! 14.3 to 15.1 works for me! And in my old age I told the hubby I want a 13.2 hd sturdy pony.
                            You need to try a gaited horse...they are much easier on the knees!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by cordial View Post
                              You need to try a gaited horse...they are much easier on the knees!
                              Nope,sorry been there. Walkers, Fox trotters, gaited Morgans, SB's, Rockies... I have ridden them. I care not to thanks. Unless I get paid, then I ride them. I'll keep my WTC horses.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by D Taylor View Post
                                Nope,sorry been there. Walkers, Fox trotters, gaited Morgans, SB's, Rockies... I have ridden them. I care not to thanks. Unless I get paid, then I ride them. I'll keep my WTC horses.
                                Can you please expand a bit on why not? I was thinking a TWH might be a good option because of my age and OA....

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by whicker View Post
                                  Are these stirrups ones that are used for endurance? The endurance ones are the widest and most cushioned that I have seen. I'm interested in anything that will help with foxhunting this Fall.

                                  I don't jump but LOVE these
                                  http://shop.thinlineglobal.com/produ...0.0.0.0?pp=12&
                                  I wasn't always a Smurf
                                  Penmerryl Sophie RIDSH
                                  "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
                                  The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    jmho!

                                    As a nurse with this problem I can say that you've gotten some good suggestions here. I'd like to add:
                                    1. First, Celebrex MUST be taken daily. It is NOT a PRN or "as needed" kinda med. It takes up to 3-6 weeks of daily doses before maximum effect is felt! I took it for years and kept foxhunting but stopped jumping.
                                    2-You may have to change the kind of riding you are doing. No more jumping for example. Every time you wrench your knee the worse it gets. Avoid jolting/jostling your knee.
                                    3. Get some kind of shock absorbing stirrup iron. Cashel cushions makes a foam foot attachment or get some Easy Rider stirrups. Both come in english. Shock is your knees enemy.
                                    4. Wear shock absorbing shoes whenever/whereever you can. No more high heels. Sneakers are your friend. Jogging shoes better!. Even wear to work & around home.
                                    5. Avoid uneven ground or surfaces to walk on or walk carefully on them. Never run on a grassy field. If you ARE going for hike/walk in the countryside then get/use a hiking stick or cane or walking stick to steady you. Use on the opposite side of your bad knee. It can take weight off your bad leg.
                                    6. Get a PT that is equestrian oriented and understands your sport. Ask them for guidance. Follow their fitness recommendations.
                                    7. Get/use a mounting block coming and going 100% of the time. NEVER jump down. Never jump period!
                                    8. Get/keep your weight down.
                                    9. Ride long ie: routinely ride 2 holes longer or dressage/western length.
                                    Most importantly; you need to change your riding for awhile or even permanently to accomodate this. It's not going away. But many of us find very fulfilling equestrian fun after the wild activities of our youths. In fact; some of us even wonder why we ever did that stuff!! Even tho' you are so young; you are facing what a lot of us older riders are facing everyday....coping with a decrepitude! I'm sorry. But there IS fun to be had after decrepitudes! Lotsa fun! Go forth...ride (albeit carefully!) and be happy!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      wateryglen those are excellent points and I'm taking them all down as I'm 43 and almost six months out now from a TKR due to bone on bone degenerative osteoarthritis and a very bad maltracking patella, the right knee is not as bad but not good either. I switched to a shorter 14.1 hand fjord a few years back and mostly just do easy trails and some arena work, don't post anymore at all. Have used a three step mounting block for years too. After my TKR though I'm finding that my passion and enthusiasm for riding is waning and I recently purchased an experienced small driving pony and will be taking driving lessons with him. No its not the same as riding but can be as or more challenging in certain areas such as dressage and cones work so I'm looking forward to broadening my horizons. Just wanted to thank you for all the good points you made and I'll be talking to my OS about possibly taking celebrex for my other knee as well as a wonky lower back that I suspect is arthritic as well, if I could have a "do-over" I would have definitely taken things much more cautiously and carefully in my youth and am trying to instill that in my son now.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I just found this thread, and appreciate the good advice offered. I was diagnosed with knee OA just last week, and had cortisone injections. Also have pes anserine bursitis in the right knee. Can't tell if they worked or not yet, but haven't really tested the knees yet either.
                                        I had a half-lease on one of my trainer's horses, but asked her for a break in order to heal. I've been grounded for a month, (hence spending lots of time on COTH and am looking forward to starting up again in Sept.

                                        *Why* had I never thought of using the mounting block to dismount, too?? My lease horse is 17h, and I had begun to dread the end of lesson dismount. It's encouraging to read that so many of you are being creative about addressing your "decrepitudes" so you can keep riding. I'm definitely going to the tack store this week to look for cushioned/wrapped stirrups.
                                        ===============
                                        It's never too late to have a happy childhood.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X