• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Turn out for actively racing horses

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Turn out for actively racing horses

    I have NO knowledge of the racing world. I have "friended" Union Rags on fb because I am a fan of Matz. On his page there are several pictures of him turned out in a good sized grass paddock. Even one of him laying down looking relaxed and happy. Is this normal practice for a racehorse that is actively racing at his level?

  • #2
    Most racetracks do not have any sort of turnout facilities but Union Rags is trained out of Fairhill Training Center- http://www.fairhilltrainingcenter.com/ and they do have paddocks for turnout.

    I have known people who train their horses off the farm and ship in to race because they want to be able to allow the horse some turnout.

    It's not typical but always makes me happy to see.
    http://www.benchmarksporthorses.com/

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Thanks. I always assumed they were all handgrazed to keep them from acting silly & hurting themselves in turnout. It made me happy to see him in a grass field being able to be a horse for a bit.

      Comment


      • #4
        Many racehorses in Europe are turned out daily. They also get real breaks. Not just forced time off due to injury. Makes for happier healthy horses. And sometimes they even have group turnout while in training. Obviously not older colts but bitchy mares but most are quite happy with buddies just like normal horses.

        Terri
        COTH, keeping popcorn growers in business for years.

        "I need your grace to remind me to find my own." Snow Patrol-Chasing Cars. This line reminds me why I have horses.

        Comment


        • #5
          Many trainers train "off the farm" or at training facilities, so turnout is an option. Not every horse is suited to being turned out in a paddock, but all can benefit from some free time in a roundpen. I have trained off the farm,and galloped at a training facility and every horse got turnout on Sundays, or after they raced or worked. Youngsters got turned out in the afternoons, or sometimes all night. Some tracks will let you have roundpens, many won't
          Originally posted by The Saddle
          Perhaps I need my flocking adjusted.

          Comment


          • #6
            I worked for a ('chase) trainer in Kentucky (championship level, mind you, not nags) who NEVER kept his horses IN! They were ALWAYS out. I adopted his methods and credit it to much of my (smurf-level) success.
            Hall of Fame (flat and jumps) trainer Jonathan Sheppard turns most/all of his out at least a little, and most of the jumps trainers have had/know of horses that are trained 'out of the field' (whether like my Kentucky connection, literally, or figuratively - with the horse out all afternoon, or all day, or all night).
            * www.huntersrest.net -- Virginia hunt country's best Bed-and-Breakfast-and-Barn.

            Comment


            • #7
              I would say the overwhelming majority of trainers would turn their horses out at least a little bit if that were an option. It's hard to come by at the track however. I used to take my horses to the farm for three or four days after they ran to turn them out if they were stabled at the track.
              McDowell Racing Stables

              Home Away From Home

              Comment


              • #8
                Every horse we get at the track and bring home for retraining gets one month of 24/7 turnout before we restart them. And I can tell you - turnout can soothe the nastiest of beasts. I realize the element of risk when you have a six figure animal and want to keep it safe, but to me living in a 12x12 box is one of the worst things mentally that these horses have to endure.
                SPAY/NEUTER/RESCUE/ADOPT!
                Little Star Chihuahua Rescue
                The Barkalicious Bakery
                On Facebook!!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've thankfully worked most from training centers or farms and we turned out a lot. I worked TBs for awhile then went to Standardbreds and was blown away by the amount of turnout our racing stock got.

                  I'm taking a little break from racing now, but when I was racing my horses all jogged minimum of 5-7 miles on non training/race days and got at least 4-8 hours of turnout. I put 2-3 mares together and tried to pair up geldings otherwise they got individual turnout. I would also jog 10 miles or so on trails to freshen them up once a month or so, found this worked great especially with rank mares. I would also ride my pacers to keep them happy, trotters rarely soured but pacers would get sour and I found riding them 2x a week and taking them on trails kept the really happy.

                  I have found that the more natural you keep a horse the better and longer they race. I have had zero colics, minimal ulcers and a lot of happy horses.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Years ago I worked for Sheppard and we turned out racing horses in groups in large pastures. At another farm in the area we turned out racing horses one at a time with a babysitter. And no we didn't bandage them, we just turned them out and let them be horses.

                    They'd come in all muddy and one of the grooms at Sheppard's used to say "here, Suzanne, hold this horse while I sweep him off" and take a broom to the horse. Eclipse award winners, three year olds, they all got the broom.

                    An older couple in that area who knew Mikey Smithwick told me that when he started out he kept his horses in a field with an outshed and when it was time to feed he tied them up and fed them all in the outshed.

                    When you think about it, there's nothing better for a horse's lungs and mind than to be out as much as possible.

                    There was a lot of good stuff to learn in those barns. The base they put on their flat horses was the same foundation they gave their steeplechase horses and it really served them well.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by moonriverfarm View Post
                      I realize the element of risk when you have a six figure animal and want to keep it safe, but to me living in a 12x12 box is one of the worst things mentally that these horses have to endure.
                      Agree with this 100%. Horses can injure themselves even in a padded stall. Happier horses are usually better performing horses.
                      Fox Haven Farm, Inc.
                      Home of 2002 JC Registered stallion Artrageous

                      Artrageous has his own Facebook page!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SEPowell View Post
                        Years ago I worked for Sheppard and we turned out racing horses in groups in large pastures. At another farm in the area we turned out racing horses one at a time with a babysitter. And no we didn't bandage them, we just turned them out and let them be horses.
                        There's apparently a picture floating around somewhere of a 2yo Storm Cat turned out with Flatterer at Sheppard's place back in the 80's. Talk about ying and yang!

                        Here is picture of Denman and Kauto Star frollicking in the pasture at Paul Nicholl's place. Picture was taken a couple of years ago at the height of their racing careers.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Drvmb1ggl3 View Post
                          There's apparently a picture floating around somewhere of a 2yo Storm Cat turned out with Flatterer at Sheppard's place back in the 80's. Talk about ying and yang!

                          Here is picture of Denman and Kauto Star frollicking in the pasture at Paul Nicholl's place. Picture was taken a couple of years ago at the height of their racing careers.
                          Yes! That's exactly the type of thing we used to stand back and watch after we turned them out.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            When I had Lad with me at Belmont I had to bargain hard to be able to turn him out in a round pen with sand for 3 hours. A LOT of the folks there wanted to use the pens that were there.

                            By my estimation I'd say the 4 sand pens had roughly 16-20 different horses in them per day. Like Laurie said I know that trainers at the track were inclined to turn out if it was possible.

                            And when I worked at Fair Hill for Matz and a few others, we had paddocks and round pens on grass available. Horses would go out for 1-2 hours give or take. Some would be out longer. But everyone who went out was wrapped with polos and sometimes bell boots as well to protect them.

                            ~Emily
                            "Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all." ~2001 The Princess Diaries

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              When my now OTTB was running, he was stabled at Belmont. Had a good 3yo year, but his other owners, lead by the managing partner, whined about wanting him run again and again. Much to their chagrin, and the trainer's insistence, they allowed a short break before his 4yo year, but improved breaks in VA before his 5 yo and 6 yo years. With a longer stretch off, he made 75% as much in 3 races as a 6 yo, then in 10 races as a 3 yo.

                              And when retired, he was a handful stabled in 2 show (1 realistically, 1 NOT) facilities with limited turn out, and is enormously improved now on full turn out with a lovely run-in and pasture pal.

                              A friend of mine tried to get a couple of his horses in at Fair Hill last month, but told me there was no room, and a waiting list.
                              But he thought, "This procession has got to go on." So he walked more proudly than ever, as his noblemen held high the train that wasn't there at all. H.C.Anderson

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by foxhavenfarm View Post
                                Agree with this 100%. Horses can injure themselves even in a padded stall. Happier horses are usually better performing horses.
                                And the more that being turned out is habit and natural for them, the less likely they will get hurt. Horses that are stalled all the time and then turned out can be truly crazy.
                                Laurie

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by lauriep View Post
                                  And the more that being turned out is habit and natural for them, the less likely they will get hurt. Horses that are stalled all the time and then turned out can be truly crazy.
                                  Kinda like this? I posted this link on Off Course a few weeks ago but your comment reminded me of it:

                                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4n8jRK7_C0

                                  Your future is created by what you do today, not tomorrow.

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    It has been so refreshing to read all these posts. I have never even been to a track, so when I said I have NO knowledge of racehorses I meant it. I honestly thought horses racing at that level would only be handwalked and/or just turned out in a small roundpen. I completely agree that the more turn out a horse gets, the better it is.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I have trainers that will rotate their track horses to/from my farm for some R&R. I pick them up the day after they race - turn them out for a few days/weeks and take them back to train/race again. The horses are wonderfully happy and deserve the break on the farm.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Here's a NYT blog on Dressage at Saratoga (yep, right there on the track.) It mentions how a number of top t-breds have benefited from dressage-style training.
                                        **********
                                        Starts with an 'S,' ends with a 'T.' You figure it out.

                                        **********
                                        "Houston, Tranquility Base here, picking up where we left off ..."

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X