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NYRA Challenges New York Times Analysis Of Horse Injuries

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  • NYRA Challenges New York Times Analysis Of Horse Injuries

    The old thread was long so I opened another to try and continue to show what racing is doing to improve our sport. I hope I will have plenty to post in the near future as ideas become rules actually implemented.


    http://www.nyra.com/aqueduct/stories/Apr122012.shtml

    "NYRA asserts that it is unreliable and potentially deceptive for the Times to rely on chart callers’ descriptions of the running of a race to estimate how often horses get injured. Chart callers are trained to describe the manner in which a race is run, not to “assess how often horses break down or get injured.” Chart callers do not follow up with trainers or veterinarians to determine whether or not a horse has suffered an injury during a race.

    Horses may be vanned off for many reasons that have nothing to do with an injury. For example, a jockey may pull up a horse if he or she believes the horse has taken a bad step. In cases like this, the horse is often vanned off as a precaution. This is a common scenario and often the horse is not found to have any physical problems."
  • Original Poster

    #2
    more from same article:
    http://www.nyra.com/aqueduct/stories/Apr122012.shtml

    "NYRA has also partnered with the New York Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association (NYTHA), the New York Thoroughbred Breeders Inc. (NYTB) on a number of initiatives aimed at developing second career opportunities for thoroughbreds who have been retired from racing.

    The recently-announced TAKE2 program creates new avenues for thoroughbreds after their racing days are over by expanding the demand for the breed in the horse show world. In addition, NYRA and NYTHA, as well as NYTB, have signed on to contribute to the Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation’s new program to retrain and adopt out as many as 100 horses per year retired from NYRA tracks. NYRA and NYTHA’s financial commitment to these efforts totals more than $250,000.

    Additionally, NYRA and NYTHA joined a broad-based group of thoroughbred industry stakeholders that recently announced the establishment of the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance (TAA) – an organization designed to serve as both the accrediting body for aftercare facilities that care for thoroughbreds following the conclusion of their racing careers and a fundraising body to support these approved facilities"

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by lifesabreeze View Post
      "NYRA asserts that it is unreliable and potentially deceptive for the Times to rely on chart callers’ descriptions of the running of a race to estimate how often horses get injured. Chart callers are trained to describe the manner in which a race is run, not to “assess how often horses break down or get injured.” Chart callers do not follow up with trainers or veterinarians to determine whether or not a horse has suffered an injury during a race.

      Horses may be vanned off for many reasons that have nothing to do with an injury. For example, a jockey may pull up a horse if he or she believes the horse has taken a bad step. In cases like this, the horse is often vanned off as a precaution. This is a common scenario and often the horse is not found to have any physical problems."
      I absolutely agree with this - I have personally examined horses that were "pulled up, vanned off" in their last race that were definitely healthy and very much alive......

      Chart data is not intended to be used for tracking injuries, and does not, in fact, track injuries with any accuracy.

      Comment


      • #4
        I read charts daily and know some chart callers and concur with the NYRA release. The chartmen are not commenting on anything but what they see. A horse beaten 40+ lengths might be called eased by one caller and not another. There is no "standard" between callers. What one caller refers to as "eased" another might say "cantered in well beaten."

        In hot weather horse who show signs of overheating/dehydration at cooled with hoses and or buckets but in many cases the ambulance comes to take them home, as a precaution. It happens alot when they ease. It's precautionary and indicates GOOD management of the horses, not bad.
        F O.B
        Resident racing historian ~~~ Re-riders Clique
        Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          NY Horsemen Present Medication Reform Policy

          http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-raci...-reform-policy

          "The New York Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association April 13 announced a plan to reform medication policies in Thoroughbred racing. The five-point proposal, first presented last year, is designed to address many of the issues that have recently brought criticism to the sport.

          "While we are hoping for industry-wide support for our proposal, our first obligation is to New York, and we believe the initiative should start here," said NYTHA President Rick Violette Jr. "These exact points were presented to several industry organizations and leaders last year, only to fall on mostly deaf ears. This is the time to get on the bus, or move out of the way."

          New York is currently in compliance with one of the five points; the goal is that the plan will become a blueprint for medication policies in racing jurisdictions nationwide."

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't know why the Times used charts in the first place because California has a necropsy program and Northern California in particular identifies every single horse that dies and why and puts it online for everyone to see in its stewards minutes. No its not NY --and not New Mexico -- but if the Times wanted a baseline, here are reports by UCDavis vets who actually examined the horses and a tally by the Northern California stewards based on these UCDavis vet reports. But apparently the Times is relying on DNFs, vanned off etc on the Golden Gate charts instead.

            Seriously does it make sense that a reliable newspaper does it that way or never mention the official tallies?

            Also it is my understanding that every horse that dies at a California race track gets a death report reported to the Jockey Club. Every horse that is insured which dies gets a death report because that is part of the standard claim process. Did the Times check with the Jockey Club?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by animaldoc View Post
              I absolutely agree with this - I have personally examined horses that were "pulled up, vanned off" in their last race that were definitely healthy and very much alive......

              Chart data is not intended to be used for tracking injuries, and does not, in fact, track injuries with any accuracy.
              The one that caught my eye recently was "A Jealous Woman" because one of the co breeders posts at the Del Mar forum. Vanned off on March 15th and then ran second in a stakes on April 7th.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Pronzini View Post
                I don't know why the Times used charts in the first place because California has a necropsy program and Northern California in particular identifies every single horse that dies and why and puts it online for everyone to see in its stewards minutes. No its not NY --and not New Mexico -- but if the Times wanted a baseline, here are reports by UCDavis vets who actually examined the horses and a tally by the Northern California stewards based on these UCDavis vet reports. But apparently the Times is relying on DNFs, vanned off etc on the Golden Gate charts instead.
                I imagine they wanted a feel for career ending injuries, not just fatalities (not that charts are an accurate way to do this, but in fairness there is no accurate way to measure that). I find it ironic that you would make this point, as whenever fatality rates are used to show that synthetics are safer than dirt, you are normally quick to point out that that doesn't take into account horses with career ending injuries from synth.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Drvmb1ggl3 View Post
                  I imagine they wanted a feel for career ending injuries, not just fatalities (not that charts are an accurate way to do this, but in fairness there is no accurate way to measure that). I find it ironic that you would make this point, as whenever fatality rates are used to show that synthetics are safer than dirt, you are normally quick to point out that that doesn't take into account horses with career ending injuries from synth.
                  Admittedly I hate synthetics but that is what they give me to run on so I have something like 35 starts on Tapeta in the last three years. I've also had to incur a year layoff on my best horse because of the inevitable hind end issues and heard from other owners about the same problems. So no I'm not a fan (although ironically enough I have 9 wins on Tapeta and grass and none so far on dirt so you'd think I would change my tune just for the sake of the scoreboard)

                  But I also recognize that real people keep stats openly and I would think if I wanted credibility on the issue, I would start there instead of counting up DNFs like someone on a fan forum. At the very least, I'd mention at the top of the article that this program exists and why it exists and that the tracks made huge investments on what it perceived to be safer alternatives and why those alternatives are controversial.

                  You know, if I wanted to actually convey information....

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The NYRA can be a huge pain in the rear, but right now I LOVE it! It is about time that the Times be held up to flames of the fire they started.



                    Am I the the only looney that is willing to bet the entire article was for the sake of a juicy headline rather than the sake of the horses?

                    "Pat the horse; kick yourself" - Carl Hester

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Not just California, some of our breakdowns here in WA go to UC Davis for their studies.

                      I just looked up two horses we formerly had who died at tracks in CA, one has a death report and one does not.

                      Heck, at Yakima in the 90s, Discard the Five was vanned off for heat exhaustion (or something minor) after a debate over whether he should walk off or get a ride. Somebody went with the van. And he broke his leg IN the wagon WHILE being vanned off.
                      It's a uterus, not a clown car. - Sayyedati

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        bumping for a few search challenged posters

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