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Keeneland Sept

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  • #41
    Always admire the handlers in the ring.- the 4.1 million colt looked like he had a little bit of mischief about him...and he was in the ring for an eternity it seemed!

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    • #42
      I wonder how the Dubawi colt looks. Out of Eblouissante.

      We'll see.

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      • #43
        Originally posted by omare View Post
        Always admire the handlers in the ring.- the 4.1 million colt looked like he had a little bit of mischief about him...and he was in the ring for an eternity it seemed!
        They are such pro's.

        I imagine they are exhausted after handling the enormous (in foal) mares at the breeding stock sales.
        Last edited by skydy; Sep. 10, 2019, 09:42 PM. Reason: Spelling

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        • #44
          skydy , keep talking to yourself, it's great!

          (Not ignoring you, just away from my computer all afternoon. If snaffle is actually at the sale, seeing the horses she's commenting on in real life, then there's a whole new set of problems with her comments. And how is she seeing so many California Chromes when there are only 4 in the whole book and 1 hasn't gone through the ring yet? )

          Honor Code filly #474.

          The No Nay Never filly was lovely and had a great walk.

          Generally the mares are much easier for the handlers to handle than the yearlings are. The mares are (mostly) more settled and know the drill. Whereas it's all a big new adventure for the majority of the yearlings.

          www.laurienberenson.com

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          • #45
            Originally posted by skydy View Post
            The No Nay Never filly looks lovely.
            No Nay Never is gorgeous. I think since Shanghai Bobby left he is my favorite beefcake stallion.

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            • #46
              Originally posted by LaurieB View Post

              Based on snaffle's comments, he or she is not seeing these horses in real life.
              You are absolutely correct. And how anyone can look at a yearling walk and say whether or not it looks like a turf horse - especially a horse by California Chrome - is beyond me. Or maybe snaffy is able to zoom in and see whether or not the youngster has a turf foot.

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              • #47
                I liked her, but of course I couldn't see her walk or have a good look round her legs or get an idea of her temperament.
                Such is the problem of judging horses on line. Great views of the head, neck, and shoulder.

                Lots of lovely yearlings today. If I'd posted every one that I fancied I'd have been typing continuously. I'm not a quick typist.

                The one California Chrome that went through today was nice, but not one of my favorites.

                I'll make sure to see your friend's filly. I only saw one of Honor Codes that went through today.

                Frosted gets some nice ones. The last one was lovely.

                Medaglia d'Oro wows as usual.

                I remember seeing what seemed to be more than a few pushy, kicking, broodmares at the November Sales but perhaps they stand out in my memory because of their behavior.

                Do you have any idea what the market will look like once we get out of the top tier, or do we have to wait and see? Are you seeing a lot of interest in horses in the later books?

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                • #48
                  Originally posted by Palm Beach View Post

                  You are absolutely correct. And how anyone can look at a yearling walk and say whether or not it looks like a turf horse - especially a horse by California Chrome - is beyond me. Or maybe snaffy is able to zoom in and see whether or not the youngster has a turf foot.
                  I asked for the reasoning behind that opinion, because there really isn't anything in the Dams' pedigrees that makes one think "TURF!" and combined with C.C. it just doesn't make sense.

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                  • #49
                    Originally posted by skydy View Post
                    Do you have any idea what the market will look like once we get out of the top tier, or do we have to wait and see? Are you seeing a lot of interest in horses in the later books?
                    Once the top tier of horses has been sold, the market will fall off a cliff (like it's been doing for the last 2 years or so.)

                    There's no way to gauge interest in horses that come later in the sale. The only yearlings on the sales grounds now are the ones that sell in book 1. The book 2 horses arrive late tomorrow and will start to show on Thursday (sales dark day.) After that, each book's horses will only ship in to show at the barns the day before they sell.

                    Plus, the horses don't just turn over (several times). The buyers do too. There will be a whole new crop of people coming in at the end of the week who are waiting for the horses to get more affordable. Then more new people in the middle of next week.

                    So many people who will be buying in the later books aren't here now--and the horses also aren't yet available to be seen.
                    www.laurienberenson.com

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                    • #50
                      Oh. I suppose it would be impossible to have them there all at once. I'm not using my brain.

                      I hope the prices don't plummet. There always seem to be some good horses in the later books.

                      I think I would enjoy seeing the horses in the later books "in person" even more than the fancier ones.

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                      • #51
                        Originally posted by skydy View Post

                        Where'sMyWhite There have only been 4 first crop horses so far. What did you think of the C.C. colt?
                        I really haven't been studying what's been going through the ring until the moments when the hammer is for more than, let's say, $2M +

                        I occasionally look at a pedigree of an interesting to me stallion but not looking much at the photos or videos.
                        When you start to observe, you become more effective... your movements soften, you see more, you are more available to becoming a team member. Be an Observer first, a Handler second.

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                        • #52
                          Originally posted by Where'sMyWhite View Post

                          I really haven't been studying what's been going through the ring until the moments when the hammer is for more than, let's say, $2M +

                          I occasionally look at a pedigree of an interesting to me stallion but not looking much at the photos or videos.
                          Sorry, I meant the question for Snaffle. I'll edit.

                          Not many videos available unless you search, which I am not willing to do. I had the time to watch the sale. Many lovely yearlings.

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                          • #53
                            NP

                            I'm still at the Bounding colt by Curlin for $4.1M by Godolphin
                            When you start to observe, you become more effective... your movements soften, you see more, you are more available to becoming a team member. Be an Observer first, a Handler second.

                            Comment


                            • #54
                              I think I've seen the answer before but it's fallen out of my head.

                              When a horse is marked 'OUT', is that usually because the horse was sold via private sale before it went in the ring? Could it also be a potential, temporary 'unsoundness' or something else?
                              When you start to observe, you become more effective... your movements soften, you see more, you are more available to becoming a team member. Be an Observer first, a Handler second.

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                Originally posted by Where'sMyWhite View Post
                                I think I've seen the answer before but it's fallen out of my head.

                                When a horse is marked 'OUT', is that usually because the horse was sold via private sale before it went in the ring? Could it also be a potential, temporary 'unsoundness' or something else?
                                It could be lots of things. Entries for this sale closed on May 1st. So that's 4 1/2 months for the yearlings to try to ding, lame, scrape up, and/or kill themselves. Or maybe they just don't progress/mature like their sellers hope they will.

                                Sometimes a horse gets a big update and the owners decide to keep it. Sometimes they do sell privately beforehand though that's not usually how it goes. (Why pay the $1,000 to enter if you want to sell privately?) Sometimes a high dollar horse doesn't draw the interest from buyers that the connections were expecting so they decide not to send it through the ring.

                                Sometimes they ship to the sales grounds and injured themselves there. Occasionally a yearling colics, or whacks a hock or an eye in its stall. It could get loose and fall down. You might be amazed how many things can go wrong (or being a horse owner, you might not. )

                                We sometimes enter two yearlings knowing we only want to sell one. If the first one sells well, we scratch the second one. If we buy back the first one, the second gets sold. We also had a sales yearling go through a fence three days before it would have shipped to Keeneland.

                                It's not unusual for the sales xrays (taken the week before the sale) to show some previously unknown problem that might be meaningless for a racehorse but would turn buyers off. So the horse stays home.

                                I'll probably think of some more reasons later...
                                www.laurienberenson.com

                                Comment


                                • #56
                                  Originally posted by Where'sMyWhite View Post
                                  NP

                                  I'm still at the Bounding colt by Curlin for $4.1M by Godolphin
                                  I have seen enough to know that when the bid reaches 2million for a yearling, and the increments jump quickly by 100k, that it is a "bidding war" (nice verbiage for a pi$$ing match) between people who are able to keep bidding for as long as they want to.

                                  They have the money to buy whatever they desire and spend it as they see fit, as is their right, unless their money is stolen or extorted from others, but we won't go there. Bless their hearts.

                                  Hopefully this lovely yearling will have a good life and make his breeders proud.

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                                  • Original Poster

                                    #57
                                    Originally posted by Mara View Post
                                    I really didn't have my hopes too high since he's not a horse who appeals to commercial breeders, but I'm disappointed that the Flintshires didn't attract much interest. One RNA'd at $40K and the other at only $9K. He was one of my favorites when he was running and, sadly, I don't expect he'll be in the US much longer unless his 2yos come out running next year like their tails are on fire.
                                    I agree. very disappointing. A lovely stallion prospect with a pedigree to match. Its a shame that there is no market for turf in North America. If he was stood in Europe, I think the tide would certainly change on his demand. 5x G1 winner and just shy of $10million in earnings. His female family is quite interesting. His sire, Dansili, is well proven.

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #58
                                      Originally posted by LaurieB View Post
                                      skydy , keep talking to yourself, it's great!

                                      (Not ignoring you, just away from my computer all afternoon. If snaffle is actually at the sale, seeing the horses she's commenting on in real life, then there's a whole new set of problems with her comments. And how is she seeing so many California Chromes when there are only 4 in the whole book and 1 hasn't gone through the ring yet? )

                                      Honor Code filly #474.

                                      The No Nay Never filly was lovely and had a great walk.

                                      Generally the mares are much easier for the handlers to handle than the yearlings are. The mares are (mostly) more settled and know the drill. Whereas it's all a big new adventure for the majority of the yearlings.
                                      my comments on the CC's were a general statement, not a statement specific so much to this sale. Additional offspring have sold through the earlier sales so far this year. Carry on.

                                      Comment


                                      • #59
                                        LaurieB while not at the moment, I've been a horse owner. I know all the creative ways they have to get hurt My first vet told me that they were born trying to commit suicide and I've often agreed

                                        I didn't realize the OUT was from the date in early May when the books were built. Guess I wasn't thinking that one through as I know the list of horses for sales like Keeneland are built and checked by the auction company well before the sale starts.

                                        Just opens up in my mind when I see a nice pedigree that is OUT, why...

                                        Do you, as a seller/consigner get to choose the order in which your horses are in the catalog so, using your example, you know the one you might want to test the water with first so you put them first, or do you have no control over the order that your horses appear?
                                        When you start to observe, you become more effective... your movements soften, you see more, you are more available to becoming a team member. Be an Observer first, a Handler second.

                                        Comment


                                        • #60
                                          skydy pi$$ing match... great way to describe what happens for some of the horses like the Bounding colt

                                          And, hey, if you have the $$, knock yourself out. The seller sure benefits in this case as does the auction house
                                          When you start to observe, you become more effective... your movements soften, you see more, you are more available to becoming a team member. Be an Observer first, a Handler second.

                                          Comment

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