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Horse Shopping- What's a deal breaker for you?????

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  • Horse Shopping- What's a deal breaker for you?????

    Just wondering if I am being overly picky, but I am out in the middle of know where and do not have access to help. Seriously, I CANNOT PAY people to come here. So, when you are looking at horses, what little thing makes you say, lovely horse but no thanks.
    Shoulders back, hands down, leg ON!

    http://mellvinshouse.blogspot.com/

  • #2
    horrible ground manners. bad feet.

    Comment


    • #3
      Bad feet, definitely.

      Comment


      • #4
        Physically: bad feet, any kind of lameness
        Behaviorally: Would rather not have any of the vices such as cribbing, weaving etc. I just don't like them, but wouldn't be a deal breaker for an otherwise perfectly suitable horse. The horse *must* behave on the ground though - i absolutely won't buy a horse shaped kite to fly out to the paddock.

        Comment


        • #5
          I don't mind broodmare in pasture condition feet. . . But I won't look at the horse in wedge shoes and pads that has to be reset every 5 weeks or he's crippled. I don't even mind hot. I do mind pushy and sullen. I don't like a horse that will stand up in response to pressure. I won't mess with a seller that tries to pressure me into a bunch of conditions. If I buy the horse, I will give them right of first refusal as a courtesy, but I won't be impressed if they want a contract.

          Comment


          • #6
            Not tall enough (I am 5'11 and all legs), bad feet, stifle lesions, kissing spine, chronic spooker (aka you get ridden in the same arena every day and still spook at the same bush in the corner every time- and a real spook like where you could fall off), anything that bucks.

            I bought a new horse last July so I'm very aware of all my "No" points lol
            Last edited by HJdaydream; Apr. 17, 2017, 03:32 PM. Reason: spelling!
            http://hunkyhanoverian.com

            Comment


            • #7
              any type of joint pathology (especially pastern issues) or stifle issue. everything else I can work with.
              AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012

              Comment


              • #8
                For me it would depend on the level of training I was buying.

                In any horse:

                I would want functional conformation for the job I wanted horse to do (says person trying to teach a Paint dressage LOL).

                I would want functional conformation for soundness, so post legs, weird leg angles, hunter's bump, etc., would be deal breakers.

                I would want sound, sound, sound, and good feet.

                Especially on a green horse, I would not care that much about ground manners if they were basically just pushy and ignorant, as I find those problems fixable. I would however pass on a horse that had an actual vicious streak or wanted to attack, or had weird panic reactions.

                I would not want any cribbing or weaving or stereotyped vices on a green horse, but I might be OK with them on a well trained older horse, where you were getting a lot of other benefits.

                And while I realize any horse can buck, bolt, spook or rear under provocation, I wouldn't want a horse that offered those behaviors regularly or out of the blue.

                For myself, I wouldn't at this point want a horse that was really hot and a ticking time bomb, like a fresh OTTB, but level of hotness is a personal thing. I realize I want more horse than some folks my age, and less horse than others, but knowing the optimum hotness level *for yourself* is really, really, important.


                Comment


                • #9
                  I will not buy one who

                  1. Rears.

                  2. Bucks to get you off.

                  3. Bad attitude.

                  4. Horrible conformation ( crooked legs, club foot, etc..)

                  What I do look for is a pleasant attitude and a willing nature. I want a horse who moves out soundly and doesn't need " special shoeing" or managing to stay sound. I can overlook some rider caused vices that are not life threatening (mine).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm going to chime in on the feet. I won't pay a single dollar for a horse that the current owner won't spend $40 for a trim on unless it's a REAL diamond in the rough and that's assuming we're not dealing with structural issues resulting from the neglect.

                    When I was pony shopping I visited the most horrific hoarding situation. None of the creatures on the property had ever seen a farrier (or a decent meal....). When I finally stated after many gentle hints I wasn't interested in spending $600-1200 on any of the horses, the owner flew off the handle at me saying that as a breeder he hoped that I "would never find what I was looking for". Well, sorry, if you don't think your horses are worth a trim and a decent bale of hay, why should I?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      One time, I bought a two year old stud colt that was nearly dead with giant pancake feet. I'm unsure if he was even broke to lead, I think he just kind of gave in and followed because he had no strength.

                      I ended up with the world's best pony. Within a year and a half, he's pretty well broke to ride, he leads now (lol), and is an easy keeper. Fearless trail pony, never puts a foot wrong, never done anything dirty, and is sweet with my young son.

                      What have I learned from this situation? I now have totally unrealistic horse buying expectations, because if this $25 pony turned out so well, can't all cheap horses turn out this well? I look at things that should be deal breakers and think "oh yeah, we can handle that."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        1) Bad attitude. Doesn't try or loses its marbles when asked to do something new.
                        2) Rearing, bolting, bucking.
                        4) Out of work horses, unless young and not started under saddle.
                        5) Unsound under saddle or on the lunge.

                        Mostly, I want a horse with a good brain, good attitude, and that is sound in the level of work I will be doing. Everything else--flexions, xrays, hooves, conformation--is negotiable. I'd buy a horse that has four club feet on backwards and upside down if it has a proven track record for being sane & sound in work for the past few years. I am pickier if the horse is young and not started under saddle, but even there I'd rather compromise on physical things (which we can do a great deal to support these days) than on the brains and attitude. And in my price range, I'm compromising somewhere.
                        Halt Near X | Horse Bloggers - Blog Directory

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My deal breaker is a seller caught being less than truthful.
                          Freeing worms from cans everywhere!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            When I brought my big stunning club footed unstarted seven year old thoroughbred home, who--for some reason known only to God and CANTER--had his feet lopped off poorly right before shipping and a hind shoe slapped on the club foot, my farrier asked if he could take photographs to bring to an upcoming farriers conference.

                            Of course.

                            When he returned, he informed me the other farriers told him he needed to tell me that the next time I went horse shopping I had to send him pictures of the hooves first.

                            I then asked him if he would prefer that I do that, and then ignore him, or if he'd rather just be surprised with what showed up

                            I do buy horses with bad feet. And some with good feet...maybe 50/50. It's just so easy for a good horse to end up owned by someone who has a shite farrier. I've also owned a number of OTTBs. I have owned maybe one who had great feet. He was Canadian...

                            As beowulf says, I avoid horses with joint issues.

                            No more bucking, no more rearing.

                            Like, reading the girl with the "lame" horse who may not be lame but who definitely bucks her off, I just think to all the horses I have started, none of them buck. Because I think it is really a learned behaviour in work, on the lunge, under tack, and if you don't ever let them buck on the lunge, I've never had an issue with it under tack. I am not a believer in letting them "buck it out" on the lunge, or one of those riders who brags about "sticking the bucks." I find if a horse bucks (not talking loss of balance or after a fence here, but out of nowhere bucks) it's because it was allowed to--even encourage--during the training process.

                            And no ugly horses
                            Let me apologize in advance.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by abrant View Post
                              I'm going to chime in on the feet. I won't pay a single dollar for a horse that the current owner won't spend $40 for a trim on unless it's a REAL diamond in the rough and that's assuming we're not dealing with structural issues resulting from the neglect.

                              When I was pony shopping I visited the most horrific hoarding situation. None of the creatures on the property had ever seen a farrier (or a decent meal....). When I finally stated after many gentle hints I wasn't interested in spending $600-1200 on any of the horses, the owner flew off the handle at me saying that as a breeder he hoped that I "would never find what I was looking for". Well, sorry, if you don't think your horses are worth a trim and a decent bale of hay, why should I?
                              Any such "breeder" with any such wish isn't worth the dirt on the bottom of your shoe, so you did very well not spending a penny there!
                              America dialed 911. Donald Trump answered the phone.

                              Stop pumping money into colleges and start getting ready to earn money in the projected tradesman shortage of 2024. Make Trades Great Again!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by CHT View Post
                                My deal breaker is a seller caught being less than truthful.
                                Yep! Especially if they can be found out through their own internet posting!
                                America dialed 911. Donald Trump answered the phone.

                                Stop pumping money into colleges and start getting ready to earn money in the projected tradesman shortage of 2024. Make Trades Great Again!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  The last horse I bought I bought her not because of what she was but the way she looked at me. She wasn't the horse we were looking for but the way her eyes were following my every move sold me.
                                  Last edited by clanter; Apr. 18, 2017, 10:28 AM.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    When your trainer has to get off and lead the horse back across the creek to the barn - because the mare backed inbetween trees and refused to move !
                                    * Lucky she didn't charge me for a new pair of boots

                                    I passed !
                                    Treat others the way you want others to treat you ~ on your threads !

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by beowulf View Post
                                      any type of joint pathology (especially pastern issues) or stifle issue. everything else I can work with.
                                      Yup. But add sore feet to the list if the owner isn't really knowledgable and willing to spend some time and money to figure out why. I'll come back. But I won't pay to do a PPE on someone else's lame horse. Sore feet can cause a panoply of other problems and if they aren't a quick and obvious fix.... then they are a harder, perhaps expensive and chronic problem.

                                      Oh, but I won't care if you have injected low-motion joints in a middle-aged, working horse. I will ask if you have injected high motion joints, however.

                                      I'll over look lack of training in hand or under saddle. But if you are selling the horse to me as going under saddle, you must be prepared to ride it before I do. And by "ride it," I mean that you must show me what the horse looks like doing what you said he could, and what I said I was trying to buy. E.g. If you said "W/T/C but green," you need to show me the canter; I ain't cantering first.
                                      The armchair saddler
                                      Politically Pro-Cat

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by ladyj79 View Post
                                        When I brought my big stunning club footed unstarted seven year old thoroughbred home, who--for some reason known only to God and CANTER--had his feet lopped off poorly right before shipping and a hind shoe slapped on the club foot, my farrier asked if he could take photographs to bring to an upcoming farriers conference.

                                        Of course.

                                        When he returned, he informed me the other farriers told him he needed to tell me that the next time I went horse shopping I had to send him pictures of the hooves first.

                                        I then asked him if he would prefer that I do that, and then ignore him, or if he'd rather just be surprised with what showed up

                                        I do buy horses with bad feet. And some with good feet...maybe 50/50. It's just so easy for a good horse to end up owned by someone who has a shite farrier. I've also owned a number of OTTBs. I have owned maybe one who had great feet. He was Canadian...

                                        As beowulf says, I avoid horses with joint issues.

                                        No more bucking, no more rearing.

                                        Like, reading the girl with the "lame" horse who may not be lame but who definitely bucks her off, I just think to all the horses I have started, none of them buck. Because I think it is really a learned behaviour in work, on the lunge, under tack, and if you don't ever let them buck on the lunge, I've never had an issue with it under tack. I am not a believer in letting them "buck it out" on the lunge, or one of those riders who brags about "sticking the bucks." I find if a horse bucks (not talking loss of balance or after a fence here, but out of nowhere bucks) it's because it was allowed to--even encourage--during the training process.

                                        And no ugly horses
                                        right - the bad feet thing is subjective -- of course I pay attention to the quality of their hooves but it's very, very easy to find a horse who has not been done well by a farrier..

                                        it's also easy to help promote good feet - good farrier, good nutrition, and good care -- can make the world of a difference between crap feet and good feet.

                                        also yes, no rearing

                                        ground manners NBD to me - I enjoy installing that on a horse.
                                        AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012

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