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This remains a mystery

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  • This remains a mystery

    I went out to feed this morning and my OTTB, Native, was out. No boards broken, no gates open, and the other boarders said they thought I had let him out. (My stalls border the pasture, so he was in a confined area at least.) I left the barn last night a little past 9, and he was munching hay in his stall.

    My first thought is, maybe someone let him out? But why? I have no problems with anyone at the barn and we are like a family. IF someone did have a secret issue with me, why let him out and not my QH gelding too? The fence around his run (his stall has a run that borders the pasture) is about 6 feet high. He is a 16.1 hand TB, but I highly doubt he jumped it.

    I dont even know where to start.

  • #2
    Why doubt he jumped out? 6 feet is not undoable to a horse with a mind to jump it, in fact, its entirely probable that he jumped out. My mare used to walk a 4' jump course (with me on her). They certainly are capable of rising up and hopping over.

    My current horse when he was 2 weeks old they used to build up hay walls to keep him in one place, and 6' he would jump over them. I see him looking at the ground on the other side of the fence, shifting his weight back and forth, evaluating the heigh of the fence. If he can put his head over it, I figure he sees it as jumpable.

    I don't know why you think he wouldn't jump out. What amazes me is why more horses don't jump out and over barriers, when they so easily could.

    Also, measure the fence. Is it actually six feet?

    Here's a nother clue to look for. Look on the inside of the enclosure to see if there is a gouge in the earth where he took off, before the fence. Then, look to see if you can see where on the other side he landed. If there's not sign, then maybe someone did let him out. Kids or something.
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.

    Comment


    • #3
      The simplest explanation is usually right: he jumped. They can be amazing athletic when motivated. I once watched my old, fat QH gelding jump a 4 ft fence from a standstill, chest up against the fence.

      *star*
      "Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexations to the spirit."
      - Desiderata, (c) Max Ehrman, 1926

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        He is extremely lazy. Very calm and level headed. Why leave his hay for an empty pasture with little grass? He doesnt like jumping, and why would he leave his stall mate? (My QH gelding in the stall next to him).

        My QH has been known to jump 4 foot fences when he wants out. Once a horse in the pasture knocked down all the boards to my TB's stall in one place, except the very bottom one, and he didnt leave then even though he had no hay, everyone else was out, and could've just stepped over to bottom board easily. They were down all day and he didnt step over the board.

        Why jump at night to be alone in an empty pasture with sparse grass?


        This just doesnt add up to me.

        Comment


        • #5
          Alien Shetland ponies.

          You horse needs a fly mask and halter to apeace them

          Comment


          • #6
            My new horse Milo mysteriously got out the other day. My husband found him in the breezeway with both doors completely closed. His stall door was securely locked. What we think happened is that he pushed his stall door which is on a track and since it doesn't have one of those door stop wheel thingy's on the bottom that he got out the side that doesn't have a latch on it. It seems impossible but that is the only way he could have gotten out.
            RIP Sucha Smooth Whiskey
            May 17,2004 - March 29, 2010
            RIP San Lena Peppy
            May 3, 1991 - March 11, 2010

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Originally posted by Alagirl View Post
              Alien Shetland ponies.

              You horse needs a fly mask and halter to apeace them
              this made me crack up, but it seems to be the most likely thing!

              Comment


              • #8
                I bet he jumped it....I had a 3 year old warmblood in that I had just gotten. Had him turned out to get some loose movement photos of him in a small paddock with a 3 strand hot wire. We were done and just letting him chill out when he walked right past us, went to the end of the paddock, real calmly walked a small 5 meter half circle and popped out over an over 6 foot high fence from essentially a stand still. Then walk all non-chalant like into the barn. Thank god my friend was with me as we stood there looking like fools for a few seconds trying to decide if what we had just seen really happened.

                Comment


                • #9
                  LOL - that is hysterical! I think its people who are all oogly about jumping. Horses consider it a tool.

                  OP - I don't know how you can decide something like "he doesn't like jumping" so he couldn't have jumped. How do you know he doesn't like jumping? He may not like jumping when a rider steers him at a (to him) stupid pile of sticks, or he may not like jumping with a (to him) box of rocks on his back, or, he may not care one way or antother, but be perfectly capable of it if it occurs to him to do it.

                  Also, "lazy" is a human word. Horses aren't "lazy" some are not inclined to move much, some are in pain and don't move much, some are bored and half asleep so they don't move much, some are too fat to move much, some like to eat grass rather than get ridden, some like to sleep in the sun, some like to stand in the shade and swat flies, but "lazy" implies an emotion a horse doesn't have.

                  Grass may or may not have been the motivation for jumping the fence. Grass doesn't HAVE to be the motivation for jumping the fence. There could have been a deer he wanted to play with. Or a fox, or a raccoon.

                  Maybe he saw a gremlin on his side of the fence, and wanted to get away from it. So, jump.

                  Or, maybe her really does love to jump, and he thought he could so he did, and you were wrong all along, or, he simply thinks jumping is a way to go somewhere which is blocked.

                  The point is, you really have no idea of what he likes or thinks. The fact is, he jumped it, so whatever you were thinking must be wrong! It only doesn't make sense to you.

                  I say this with a smile, because we all have to constantly remind ourselves that we shouldn't assume anything about anyone, or about another creature, and let them inform us of who they are and accept that. Makes life a whole lot simpler, and less head scratching.

                  He just jumped.
                  Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Many years ago my 2 year old NSH filly decided she wanted to go visit the neighbors gelding (I only had mares) and she just cantered up to the 5 foot fence and sailed over it. Blew me away...I had a time catching her she was having so much fun!!!! If I hadn't been there to watch her I would have wondered how she got out also. We extended the fence to 7 feet to make sure she couldn't get out.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Do check for take off signs in the paddock...and take a look at his belly just in case. (possibly a rub/scrape there if he isn't as scopey as you say?)
                      There isn't any rhyme or reason to why horses do anything I've come to realize over the years. The "grass is greener" on the other side of the fence even if there isn't any grass over there. Invisible dragons may have visited. It could have been an evil Shitland alien. Chipmunks have been known to gang up into hoardes of land-piranhas. The other horse could have told yours he was a sissy-jumper.
                      And I've known a ton of herd-bound non-jumpers who happily hopped tall fences for no good reason. The most herd bound usually then freak out when they realize there's a fence in between them and the herd.
                      You jump in the saddle,
                      Hold onto the bridle!
                      Jump in the line!
                      ...Belefonte

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Another vote for he jumped out.
                        Tell a Gelding. Ask a Stallion. Discuss it with a Mare... Pray if it's a Pony!

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          [QUOTE=MistyBlue;4887600] The other horse could have told yours he was a sissy-jumper.
                          QUOTE]

                          This.

                          I say he's "lazy" because he has a been there done that kind of attitude about most things.

                          I say he doesnt like to jump because when put in a situation where it would favor him to jump (with or without a rider or grass etc) he almost never jumps.

                          Maybe jumping is his passion. How would I ever know?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yeah, they like to screw with our heads like that. "Oh no, I prefer not to jump" and the second you take your eyes off of them they're boinging out of the paddock and going walkabout.
                            You jump in the saddle,
                            Hold onto the bridle!
                            Jump in the line!
                            ...Belefonte

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              Not to mention he has a bone chip in his right front knee and he has some pain in it.(sometimes) So i automatically in my head ruled out him jumping.

                              He seems to only have pain when I want him to do something like stop grazing. Suddenly his foot is totally lame and he wont put weight on it, and kind of paws the air.

                              Then when he see's that mom has treats he heals up and isnt lame at all.

                              Horses have the cutest personalities.

                              People say they dont have the same feelings as us, but sometimes I wonder

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by ThatGirlTina View Post
                                People say they dont have the same feelings as us, but sometimes I wonder
                                Sometimes I swear they are just better at training then humans. Everybody always thinks we teach the horses what to do......but I can honestly say my horses have me pretty trained as well. Feels a little silly when you realize you were outsmarted by a 1200# horse with a small brain.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by ThatGirlTina View Post
                                  He is extremely lazy. Very calm and level headed. Why leave his hay for an empty pasture with little grass? He doesnt like jumping, and why would he leave his stall mate? (My QH gelding in the stall next to him).

                                  My QH has been known to jump 4 foot fences when he wants out. Once a horse in the pasture knocked down all the boards to my TB's stall in one place, except the very bottom one, and he didnt leave then even though he had no hay, everyone else was out, and could've just stepped over to bottom board easily. They were down all day and he didnt step over the board.

                                  Why jump at night to be alone in an empty pasture with sparse grass?


                                  This just doesnt add up to me.
                                  You're trying to apply human logic to the equine brain.
                                  http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

                                  Originally Posted by JSwan
                                  I love feral children. They taste like chicken.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    If my pig can jump over a 4' stall door, your horse can jump over a fence.

                                    I think your horse probably jumped out.
                                    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                                    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                                    -Rudyard Kipling

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Why jump at night to be alone in an empty pasture with sparse grass?
                                      1. The grass is always greener on the other side.

                                      2. He wanted to be alone.

                                      3. He was practicing for the long jump and couldn't get back in.

                                      4. He's actually a lockpicker and really, really good at covering up his crime.

                                      Who knows? Horses and other critters do weird things or rather things we don't understand - I'm sure if he could communicate the whys to you, it would make sense.
                                      Delicious strawberry flavored death!

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        is he friends with the fabulous jumping pig in the thread on "around the farm" forum?

                                        My 17.3 hh boy once jumped a five foot fence from a standstill, while he was standing on the downhill side of the fence, making it at least 6 inches taller, while the stablemaster watched. To get from one dry lot paddock into another dry lot paddock. For the heck of it. And otherwise, he was a TERRIBLE jumper who hangs his feet!

                                        My 15.2 hh mare, who is a fabulous jumper, has been known to jump through a 4 foot high dutch door to get out of her stall, onto concrete...This was after we replaced her stall guard with the door, because she was always finding a way to crawl under the stall guard!
                                        "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF

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