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leasing out your horse- is it worth it?

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  • leasing out your horse- is it worth it?

    I'm toying with the idea of half leasing my gelding. I've leased other people's horses before but have never been on the other side of the arrangement and leased out one of my own.

    The reason I am now considering this is because I can't afford the barn my horse is at any more. It is a fabulous facility where my horse is extremely happy and doing the best he's ever done. If I could find someone to lease him and therefore knock a couple hundred off the board we could stay. Otherwise I'm going to have to move to a lesser facility.

    Tell me your experiences good and bad. I'm a bit of a nervous horse mommy and I'm not sure it is a good idea. How do you find someone to lease your horse that is trustworthy and competent. I'm fine with giving up the riding time, I just worry about a bad situation.

    Do you think it is worth the risk to try to find someone to lease him in order to stay at the superior facility? Things I should definitely do/watch out for?
    Thanks!

  • #2
    I "half-leased" out one of my geldings two different times. Both women who leased him took two lessons a week on him, with the option to show him once a month. It worked out well for me, and for them, too, since he taught them a lot. I knew both of them very well going into the arrangement, so I was comfortable and we talked about what I expected beforehand.

    One lease lasted about a year, and the other six months. I rode him a couple of times a week. It took a lot of pressure off both financially and time-wise, since I had two other horses at the barn at that time.

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    • #3
      Stick to what you know works. It that's the facility, definitely try to stay. But also see if you can get the trainer there to help pick the lessee.

      You will have to think hard about the terms of the lease you write. And then, even when you find the perfect lessee and you have warned her that you're a "nervous horse mommy" you'll still have to make a concerted effort not to micromanage.

      But if you have a good facility, good trainer, good lessee and everyone is clear, you'll be able to pick your battles wisely. It works best when you assume the everyone wants the best for your horse and is participating in a team effort. The day you start underlying conflicting interests (as often gets stated here), you'll be more likely to see problems and your peeps as adversaries. Don't willingly go there, and your lease will work much, much better.
      The armchair saddler
      Politically Pro-Cat

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      • #4
        I've been very happy with most of the part-leasing that I have done. I credit my success to two factors: (1) My horses have always stayed with me, under my control and with everything going on with them in my clear view; and (2) I have a painfully detailed lease agreement that spells out each party's rights and responsibilities and my expectations, down to specifically what tack may be used and how it is to be cared for.

        OP, if you'd like to see my lease agreement and modify it for your use, I'm happy to share; just PM me.
        Equinox Equine Massage

        In the depth of winter, I finally learned that there was in me invincible summer.
        -Albert Camus

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        • #5
          I'm probably going to be half-leasing my pony starting in April. After I got my TB in early 2008, I still kept pony at the same barn, but allowed him to be used for a few lessons a week. I got a small credit on my board bill for each lesson. My barn is kind of expensive, and it wasn't until now that a person who rides him in lesson and loves him is able to lease him. She really doesn't need an all-the-time horse, so the half lease should work for both of us, as I still like to ride him too. Good luck!
          It's 2017. Do you know where your old horse is?

          www.streamhorsetv.com -- website with horse show livestream listings and links.

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          • #6
            I'm going to be the downer here, but...

            I leased one of my ponies out years ago and had TERRIBLE experiences. This was the easiest pony to keep sound (and to keep weight on), went barefoot her whole life, etc. etc. Both times she was leased out, she was sent back to me dead lame and once a vet even told me that she wouldn't even be pasture sound. Funny, once both the splints she had popped went down (she was clean legged when I sent her there, and somehow NO ONE noticed these?!) and I pulled the bar shoes off her, she was perfectly sound...

            I have also had trials go south very quickly. Hopefully I'm one of few who has had so many bad experiences, but I will never lease out again, nor will I send an animal out on trial.
            http://www.youtube.com/user/supershorty628
            Proudly blogging for The Chronicle of the Horse!

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            • #7
              hey colored horse, I would love to see that lease agreement. Has a lawyer seen/ commented on it?

              Thanks!
              Real Horses. Real Riders. Real Results! www.wvhorsetrainer.com

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              • #8
                If you are doing an "in barn/part lease" you will be able to monitor your horse as you will be there several times a week, riding him and getting a feel for how he's doing.
                If this is a nicer barn, there may bve a few people out there who are good riders/horsemen who might want to part lease, ask the trainer who they might recommend. Be sure you see them ride and handle horses before even getting into the discussion. Be sure they use the kind of care you'd want your horse treated with and that they ride to your expectations. Then watch them ride your horse and see how they pair up.
                Be sure you have a thorough understanding of what she may do with your horse. Can she jump him? Hack him in the woods? How high can they jump together and under the supervision of who? Horse shows? What equipment does he require and who will provide it?
                I'd also go with a month to month lease so that if you feel at any time like your horse is not getting the right treatment from the leasor that you can end the deal.
                F O.B
                Resident racing historian ~~~ Re-riders Clique
                Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by supershorty628 View Post
                  I'm going to be the downer here, but...

                  I leased one of my ponies out years ago and had TERRIBLE experiences. This was the easiest pony to keep sound (and to keep weight on), went barefoot her whole life, etc. etc. Both times she was leased out, she was sent back to me dead lame and once a vet even told me that she wouldn't even be pasture sound. Funny, once both the splints she had popped went down (she was clean legged when I sent her there, and somehow NO ONE noticed these?!) and I pulled the bar shoes off her, she was perfectly sound...

                  I have also had trials go south very quickly. Hopefully I'm one of few who has had so many bad experiences, but I will never lease out again, nor will I send an animal out on trial.
                  I hear you, shorty, but there's a big difference between sending a horse/pony out and doing an in-barn half lease under the supervision of your trainer.

                  I've never done a send-out lease, but I've half-leased my horse to someone who trainer with my trainer. It was easy! Everything was written out, but my trainer took a lot of the pressure off me. It was in her best interest to have everything work out, so she did her best to make sure that we were both happy.

                  I, PERSONALLY, wouldn't think twice about an in-barn half-lease to a rider who trains with the same trainer. It doesn't get any better that than in my opinion!!
                  Originally posted by tidy rabbit
                  Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by supershorty628 View Post
                    I'm going to be the downer here, but...

                    I leased one of my ponies out years ago and had TERRIBLE experiences. This was the easiest pony to keep sound (and to keep weight on), went barefoot her whole life, etc. etc. Both times she was leased out, she was sent back to me dead lame and once a vet even told me that she wouldn't even be pasture sound. Funny, once both the splints she had popped went down (she was clean legged when I sent her there, and somehow NO ONE noticed these?!) and I pulled the bar shoes off her, she was perfectly sound...

                    I have also had trials go south very quickly. Hopefully I'm one of few who has had so many bad experiences, but I will never lease out again, nor will I send an animal out on trial.
                    Yes, but she is talking about a one half, on-site lease.

                    I too had a really bad experience. Took the poor horse almost a year to recover from 3 months of poor care, training and riding. Luckily, he wasn't seriously injured and was able to recuperate. I will NEVER have an off-site lease again.

                    Probably, the more restrictions the better (without becoming ridiculous)...number of rides/lessons per week and only at your facility. Number of shows with a stipulation that a pre-approved trainer must be present, etc. You may want to restrict jumping to only in a lesson.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I did a half-lease, on-site with my gelding and fortunately it worked out great. I had graduated from college and started working/living about an hour from the barn. I could not afford the full board by myself while also paying my other bills and there were not any good boarding options where I was living. I didn't know what to do Horse was 17ish and I'd had him since he was 7 so selling was not an option for me.

                      So, I spoke with the BM about a half lease option and she was able to hook me up with a mom and daughter at the barn. The daughter was probably 9 at the time and was the one that mostly rode him. The mom rode him some too. They were both the perfect match for him in terms of riding style/temperament and I had the bonus of having the BM there to watch over things. My horse had been there for years so they knew him as well as I did. Mom/daughter had him Mon-Thurs and I had him Fri-Sun since those were the only days I could make it to the barn. Jumping was limited to lessons only. We split board/vet/farrier costs right down the middle. They even offered to pay half of the bill when I had to make an unexpected trip to the NCSU CVM for an eye issue. They were great people! This arrangement went on for a couple of years and was only ended due to some soundness issues that were not a result of anything that the mom/daughter did wrong. So it can be a great arrangement with the right person but I also imagine it can be a nightmare if you get matched up with the wrong person.
                      "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

                      Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by thathorse View Post
                        hey colored horse, I would love to see that lease agreement. Has a lawyer seen/ commented on it?

                        Thanks!
                        PM me with your email and I'll happily send it to you.

                        I did in fact have an attorney friend review it; keep in mind that this was in VA and state laws/language will differ. The big thing is to make sure that you include language that matches state language regarding equine liability and general property (not dwelling) leasing agreements.
                        Equinox Equine Massage

                        In the depth of winter, I finally learned that there was in me invincible summer.
                        -Albert Camus

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by supershorty628 View Post
                          Both times she was leased out, she was sent back to me dead lame and once a vet even told me that she wouldn't even be pasture sound.
                          (Emphasis above mine.) I think the key to a good lease is to keep the horse under your control. I don't lease horses off my property and I don't send sale horses on trial. Period.
                          Equinox Equine Massage

                          In the depth of winter, I finally learned that there was in me invincible summer.
                          -Albert Camus

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                          • #14
                            I have heard of leases and half leases that turned out wonderfully for everyone but it would kill my soul to have someone else with my horse. To me they are personal things and MINE MINE MINE! Guess I'd consider it if I got to where that was the only way I could feed and care for them.
                            Yep, I'm selfish and greedy as all get out when it comes to my horses. NOBODY elses.....MINE!
                            For a lease to work out well make sure you don't have my crappy selfish attitude.
                            You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.

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                            • #15
                              Woops... reading comprehension failure on my part - sorry about that!
                              http://www.youtube.com/user/supershorty628
                              Proudly blogging for The Chronicle of the Horse!

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                              • #16
                                I have done several different half leases like what you are considering - that is to say, I half-leased the horse, not that I've half-leased my horse. They can be great arrangements for everyone. Working with the BM / your trainer to help you find an appropriate lessor is a big help in being certain that you're going to find someone who is at least in the ballpark regarding horse care and handling practices.
                                I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
                                I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I have leased or half leased my older gelding out a couple times, making sure he was where I could keep an eye on him even if it was a full lease. In fact, he is currently half-leased to a 10 year old girl and her family that I knew from my barn. They love him and it allows me to spend more time with my new horse while giving my old guy just the right amount of work and straining my budget a little less.
                                  So, depending on how you do it, half leases can be fantastic! I do highly suggest a written lease agreement though even if you know the person leasing really well and outline as much as you reasonably can in the lease agreement.
                                  My blog:

                                  RAWR

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                                  • #18
                                    I wouldn't have considered sending my horse to live elsewhere...how could that work in a half-lease situation? With him at my home barn I could not only watch him being ridden, but I rode him as well, and he "told" me what he'd been working on that week just by how he was when I rode him. I wouldn't feel comfortable with him out of my control and out of my barn.

                                    Plus, with him in the same barn, occasionally I'd be out there when the woman leasing him would arrive, and I could see how he reacted to her. Always had his ears up and a happy expression when she approached him, which told me he liked and trusted her. Believe me, this horse was very opinionated and expressive with who he did and did not like!

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