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I HATE HATE HATE cattle panels - years old thread - somehow resurrected?

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  • I HATE HATE HATE cattle panels - years old thread - somehow resurrected?

    We have > 3,500 ft of fencing here. We are super strict on our fencing. All the external fencing is RedBrand no climb horse mesh, all the internal is 2 strand horse guard tape. All our T posts have caps, no debris in our pastures etc etc. EXCEPT - there is about 100 ft of cattle panel that the neighbor put up in one corner. Our horses are pretty sedate and are good on the fences. However - last night, for some reason unknown to me, our lovely foster horse, who has literally JUST been started under saddle and is doing fantastically, must have had an argument with the cattle panel. From looking at the panel, she must have got her hind through it - who knows why or how! got caught and freaked out. Unfortunately the panel did not come down so she must have argued with it for a while. This is a heavy duty panel and there is now a hole big enough for my 60lb dog to get through. Unfortunately she didn't fare too well either. Her hock is bigger than a football and the bone is visible - not a huge portion but through some of the raw flesh.

    She's downstairs in the barn in a lot of pain. The vet has been out but didn't do much other than 3g bute IV and some antibiotics. He said the next couple of days it would be really important to watch how she does to see if it's going to heal. I'm not so convinced and am wondering if a trip to hospital might be better tomorrow. I am terrified that she gets a bone infection. She is SUCH a good girl and was just doing so great under saddle.

    No need to berate me on how stupid it is to have left that damn section. You couldn't make me feel worse than I do right now.
    Last edited by Kate66; Oct. 31, 2012, 09:48 PM.

  • #2
    I don't know what a cattle panel is, but I sure hope your foster horse makes it through okay. I am picturing the vet books where there's some really gruesome injury, and three months later there's barely a scar.

    May your sound horse have barely a scar.
    2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

    A helmet saved my life.

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    • #3
      Stop beating yourself up about this. Right now!

      Seriously, horses can and do try to commit suicide on every type of fencing. I've had horses kept in cattle panels for years with no problems. But the rescue has had one horse disembowel itself on a t-post. Another horse impale itself on a wooden post (beautiful wood post and rail fence - which everything would think was safe). I've heard of horses ripping their legs off on cable fencing, and I have a friend who had a horse hang (and kill) herself in the fork of a tree.

      Lily's accident is awful and sucks, but stop beating yourself up about it.
      Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

      Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com

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      • #4
        Not your fault.

        I've been beating myself up over a fencing accident my horse had recently.

        At the end of the day until we can afford our 7 foot, solid wood with marshmellow fluff padding on the inside our horses will find a way to hurt themselves.

        We just have to do the best we can.
        http://www.clarkdesigngrouparchitects.com/index.html - Lets build your dream barn

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        • #5
          My inclination would be a trip to vet hospital to get on top of things as soon
          as possible. Jingles for your girl!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Meredith Clark View Post
            Not your fault.

            I've been beating myself up over a fencing accident my horse had recently.

            At the end of the day until we can afford our 7 foot, solid wood with marshmellow fluff padding on the inside our horses will find a way to hurt themselves.

            We just have to do the best we can.
            Agree 100%! Furthermore, they'd probably try and chocke on the marshmellow fluff!

            I hope everything turns out okay. Shat happens. Don't beat yourself up.
            :hugs:
            Steppin Not Dragon "Bella"
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            • #7
              Originally posted by BasqueMom View Post
              My inclination would be a trip to vet hospital to get on top of things as soon
              as possible. Jingles for your girl!
              Ditto this!!! And hugs to both of you.
              www.specialhorses.org
              a 501(c)3 organization helping 501(c)3 equine rescues

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              • #8
                Accidents are that, accidents and can happen anywhere.

                Saying that, a local breeder many years ago, when those welded wire panels came out, built some fancy horse pens for his very expensive race horses and used cattle panels welded to big oilfied pipe.

                After three years and many injuries, he took every one of those panels down and never had any more injuries.
                I think all of us here learned from him and don't use them around horses.

                I have seen people use those panels even in stalls, on the upper part and I wonder how many injuries they may get from them.
                Maybe you could add some hot wire on or in front of them?

                Don't blame yourself, because with horses, you can only do so much and accidents just happen.

                I hope your filly will be ok, that sounds very serious.

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                • #9
                  Oh no! How awful! Don't beat yourself up. You know they try to injure themselves even in padded stalls.

                  With the way you have described it, the hospital is probably a good idea. If they can't do anything for it but let it heal, at least then you won't second guess yourself. If you don't go, you'll wonder if you should have, especially if things go bad.

                  Jingles for your girl.

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                  • #10
                    When we needed to board our pony while our barn was being built I looked at the fencing as a very important component. I chose a farm and one thing that sold me the no climb well built fence. Four months later our pony was dead having crashed into the fence.
                    So please don't feel guilty. They will hurt themselves no matter what we do. Unless we can design airbags for the fence when they hit it.
                    I hope your sweet girl is better soon.

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                    • #11
                      Horses want to hurt themselves innately, don't blame yourself. But would someone please tell me what a cattle panel is or looks like? Have never heard that term before. ???????
                      I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
                      I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09

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                      • #12
                        If you want something that doesn't try and kill/cripple itself at every opportunity...get a mule or a donkey.

                        Horses, some of mine spent their limited brainpower figuring out how to injure themselves. Had one break his jaw getting it caught on a bucket.

                        If you don't make the problem area safer now, it is your fault. Just fix it and go on.
                        "Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc"

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Lori B View Post
                          Horses want to hurt themselves innately, don't blame yourself. But would someone please tell me what a cattle panel is or looks like? Have never heard that term before. ???????
                          Welded wire panels are stiff panels made from a thick wire welded to each other.
                          You can see the difference with woven wire and welded wire here:

                          http://www.okbrandwire.com/standards-agr2.htm

                          The welded wire is so stiff it holds on it's own, you add it to posts with staples, wire it or weld it to pipe.

                          The trouble is that the ones made for cattle, a horse can get a foot thru and the ends on all of those, unless very well protected with wood over them or each one welded on, they can poke a horse and cause serious injuries.

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                          • #14
                            I'm convinced horses spend most of their time thinking of new and interesting ways to commit suicide.

                            Don't be so hard on yourself.


                            ETA: I just looked out the window and my horses are racing around in the mud playing chicken. Good Lord.
                            Last edited by JSwan; Mar. 3, 2010, 09:54 AM. Reason: add something
                            Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                            Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                            -Rudyard Kipling

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                            • #15
                              First day of large animal medicine, our prof said
                              "Horses are born, then they spend the rest of their lives trying to commit suicide"

                              I would probably feel more comfortable with the horse in a horsepital, or at least re-evaluated more thoroughly (not that the evaluation wasn't thorough, sometimes problems don't show up until the third or fourth post injury day.)

                              Probably where your vet was going with this is that sometimes these types of injuries don't look too bad at first, but after two or three days tissues that were damaged due to pressure/trauma/'rugburn' start to die off-and you can't see that at first. So he/she may have been trying to not get your hopes up about just a small amount of bone poking through.

                              I would probably want radiographs and thorough debridement with a heavy RJ type bandage. I assume the horse is on some heavy antibiotics?
                              Michael: Seems the people who burned me want me for a job.
                              Sam: A job? Does it pay?
                              Michael: Nah, it's more of a "we'll kill you if you don't do it" type of thing.
                              Sam: Oh. I've never liked those.

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                              • #16
                                Sometimes really horrible-looking injuries can heal remarkably well. Actually one of my clients picked up a mare at the auction with an injury that sounds very similar, plus it was terribly infected, and she has a nasty scar now but she's totally sound and spends all day chasing cows through the foothills. I hope your horse has an excellent recovery.

                                Cattle panels (I didn't know what they were called until this thread, but used to board at a barn that had them) do suck as fencing, but you can only do so much to keep your horses safe and beating yourself up after the fact doesn't do any good. Maybe string up some electric fencing or whatever until you can get those panels replaced, but otherwise just focus on taking care of your pony and try not to be so hard on yourself.
                                exploring the relationship between horse and human

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                                • #17
                                  know a small barn owner who fenced most of the pasture in with- get this- string and plastic bags. One thin strand of easily broken string strung at approximate horse mid-chest height with a piece of white plastic bag tied to it every five or so feet. She said it kept the horses in just as well as anything else she'd ever tried, and none of them had managed to injure themselves on it.

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                                  • #18
                                    This sounds similar to what my young horse did a few weeks back sticking his hind leg through the only stretch of wood 3-rail fencing I have (the rest is Centaur HTP). He must have done it sometime in the night, so by the time I saw him in the morning, the hock and surrounding areas were enormous, he was non-weight bearing, and I thought for sure he had fractured the hock or leg. He took off skin and flesh from just below the stifle to just above the fetlock. Not as deep as what you are describing, but ugly.

                                    Had the vet out and got him on antibiotics and anti-inflammatories, wrapped, etc. It was amazing how much the swelling went away just after one day of meds, and he started bearing weight and looking much better. He was seen by the vet several times, and as he improved and (after the swelling went down), flexed reasonably well, we did not x-ray.

                                    He's looking quite good now, and the wound has healed and started to hair over -- I thought for sure he would have a terrible scar. I hope that your horse has similar healing/recovery, but definitely would get some meds as any wound near a joint would have me worried about infection.

                                    I was upset with myself for not changing that small portion of fencing, but it never seemed like a hazard. That section is now covered in plywood to make it solid and hopefully prevent another similar injury. I'm sure he'll just find somewhere else to hurt himself...this is the same horse that punctured his head on a plastic bucket!

                                    Good luck; keep us posted!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Yikes Lorna! When I heard from you yesterday I was really hoping it just sounded worse than it is... Jingles!

                                      Don't beat your self up about it, as everyone has said, horses could kill themselves with a feather if they tried hard enough!

                                      Hang in there, good luck, let me know if you need anything!
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                                      • #20
                                        Sending jingles! I swear, if you put a horse in a padded room, they'd find some way of hurting themselves.
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