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Horse shot in the head.

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  • Horse shot in the head.

    Here is another sad story reflecting what is happening in some parts of the country in our sinking economy and how horses are faring:

    http://www.cattlenetwork.com/More-Ho...q_v=bac3336c15

    I am afraid that animal control is going to have to step in more and more and not only start handling larger numbers of horses, but figure a way to euthanize and dispose in them in larger numbers.

    That is one way the HSUS could gain good will, if they would give a few of their millions they get donated every year to subsidize the already existing county and city run animal control efforts.
    Would not cost them that much and may be superior PR for them, as they then can ask for donations for that effort.

  • #2
    but figure a way to euthanize and dispose in them in larger numbers....That is one way the HSUS could gain good will...Would not cost them that much and may be superior PR for them, as they then can ask for donations for that effort
    I am in doubt that there would be a great number of people who would donate money to euthanise horses. Nor that it would be "great PR" for anyone to suggest it, even if it might be the best idea.

    Non-horse people and indeed some horse people, don't see what is going on, and will be up in arms if anyone suggests euthansia as an option, andin fact this idea might go a ways towards temporarily feeding all those pseudo-"rescues" that seem to spring up eveywhere. Definitely NOT what is wanted at all.

    Just my opinion, NJR
    Your beliefs don't make you a better person, your behaviour does.

    Comment


    • #3
      well, it would go to their real mission...getting rid of some pets...
      Originally posted by BigMama1
      Facts don't have versions. If they do, they are opinions
      GNU Terry Prachett

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, the economy has hit horses hard. From the law enforcement officers, animal control officers, humane societies, rescues, etc. I've spoken to in Texas, I can count up probably close to 2,000 horses handled by those agencies in Texas last year. And I only talked to a small portion of the agencies in the state that handled horses. And those were mostly neglect cases (either seizures or horses who were surrendered). That's a lot of horses in just one state...

        And I'm turning away sheriff's departments over and over now. We just don't have the room.

        And people like me get put in a bad spot. If I were to propose euthanizing the older horses who are companion only to make room for the healthier horses who might have a chance, I get called a horse killer and see donors and adopters and foster homes flee the rescue (enabling me to help even fewer horses).

        It is a bad spot to be in. Basically, damned if you do. Damned if you don't!
        Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

        Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Unintended Consequence

          Bluey ... Your posted article is an example of problems the ban on horse slaughter created. The ban was a simple minded solution to a complex issue.
          Equus makus brokus but happy

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by hosspuller View Post
            Bluey ... Your posted article is an example of problems the ban on horse slaughter created. The ban was a simple minded solution to a complex issue.

            yeah, but it would have been a good short term solution for a pressing problem....

            Chicken-egg
            egg-chicken....
            Originally posted by BigMama1
            Facts don't have versions. If they do, they are opinions
            GNU Terry Prachett

            Comment


            • #7
              My personal opinion is that the slaughter ban was a good idea, but at the wrong time. When it all started, the economy was robust, life was better, there were more folks possibly to handle the overflow of horses. It seems that the closing of the plants and the tanking of the economy occured at about the same time, which of course compounded the "unwanted horse" problem.

              I suppose a well placed bullet is a quick and relatively painless solution, the issue is that these fools don't know how to do it correctly.

              I wish and pray that things would get better for everyone, so that we would read fewer of these heartbreaking stories in the news every day.

              I thought the article made an excellent point of the fact that horses can live into their 30's and should be a life-long commitment whenever possible, and that people need to take that into consideration when getting into horses.
              There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by hosspuller View Post
                Bluey ... Your posted article is an example of problems the ban on horse slaughter created. The ban was a simple minded solution to a complex issue.
                In a misguided effort to mitigate suffering , this has caused exponentially MORE suffering for these animals.
                The thing about smart people, is they look like crazy people, to dumb people.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by hosspuller View Post
                  The ban was a simple minded solution to a complex issue.
                  There is no ban on horse slaughter in the US.

                  I agree that closing the plants and forcing the animals to travel to Canada and Mexico is horrible. And it the absolute worst thing that could have possibly happened to the nations horses. That blame lies squarely on the shoulders of HSUS and other AR groups.

                  But there is no actual ban on horse slaughter. Not yet, anyway.
                  Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                  Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                  -Rudyard Kipling

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Originally posted by JSwan View Post
                    There is no ban on horse slaughter in the US.

                    I agree that closing the plants and forcing the animals to travel to Canada and Mexico is horrible. And it the absolute worst thing that could have possibly happened to the nations horses. That blame lies squarely on the shoulders of HSUS and other AR groups.

                    But there is no actual ban on horse slaughter. Not yet, anyway.
                    Yes, that part of the story was incorrect and the one comment on the bottom touched on it.
                    The rest seems to be true.

                    This is a bad situation, when people that don't know what they are doing think they can't do other than try to shoot ther own horses.

                    We need more education on what is happening and choices for people to turn to when they find themselves with horses they can't or don't know how to care for.

                    Our TV station just did one such story yesterday, the problem is getting so bad it has become urgent.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JSwan View Post
                      There is no ban on horse slaughter in the US.

                      I agree that closing the plants and forcing the animals to travel to Canada and Mexico is horrible. And it the absolute worst thing that could have possibly happened to the nations horses. That blame lies squarely on the shoulders of HSUS and other AR groups.

                      But there is no actual ban on horse slaughter. Not yet, anyway.

                      Thank you for posting that before I got to it. US horses are still shipping to slaughter. They're bringing lower prices as they're shipping further, but they're shipping. A LOT of the people who have neglected horses or who abandon their horses wouldn't ship them to slaughter if they lived next door to the slaughter plants.

                      It is similar to people who dump their dogs off out in the country because they don't want them euthanized at shelters. They think someone else will come along and take care of the problem. OR they don't realize there is a problem.

                      The economy and rough weather patterns in many parts of the country are likely far more to blame on the current glut of horses than the closure of the US slaughter houses.
                      Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

                      Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        jenn - I don't know how many local auctions have stopped accepting horses.

                        Where I live, our local livestock auction stopped taking horses because the bottom dropped out of the market. Prices were just so low it wasn't worth doing.

                        Now I ask you this. Where did those horses go? It was one less place for a horse to be sold.... so did they go farther to another auction or what? That thought really scared me. I was getting offers of free horses every time I went to the feed store. What happened to the horses?

                        (the auction may have since resumed, but the last time I was up there they'd stopped horse auctions)
                        Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                        Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                        -Rudyard Kipling

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Good question - and one I overlooked (my apologies). I haven't heard of any around here who have recently stopped accepting horses (the last one I heard was several years ago when the slaughter houses were still open). We're obviously a lot closer to the border than you are, too.

                          So I guess I need to revise and say... in some areas, it still is pretty easy to send a horse to slaughter. You don't get as much money as you used to, but you can still send them. What I hear when we help with neglect cases is that the people don't want to part with the horse at all (slaughter wasn't an option) or don't think they're doing anything wrong (slaughter wasn't an option - since they feel like they should keep their horses).

                          We HAVE seen more abandoned horses, and I hypothesize that in much of Texas, they're abandoned because the owners don't want them slaughtered but can't find homes for them.

                          I wonder, though, if some of the people just don't know about auctions. That's complete speculation - but you are finding more and more absolutely clueless horse owners. They may not realize that's even an option....

                          Originally posted by JSwan View Post
                          jenn - I don't know how many local auctions have stopped accepting horses.

                          Where I live, our local livestock auction stopped taking horses because the bottom dropped out of the market. Prices were just so low it wasn't worth doing.

                          Now I ask you this. Where did those horses go? It was one less place for a horse to be sold.... so did they go farther to another auction or what? That thought really scared me. I was getting offers of free horses every time I went to the feed store. What happened to the horses?

                          (the auction may have since resumed, but the last time I was up there they'd stopped horse auctions)
                          Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

                          Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Retraction:

                            I'll stand corrected on the slaughter ban... The efforts of the various animal groups resulted in shutting down the US slaughter plants. Didn't seem to me that the plants wanted to go out of business. There ... Same effect as a ban.

                            The posted article touched on the plants shutting down's effect on horse prices. People don't abandon something valuable. Horse, cat, dog or object... But when the cost of disposal is more than the value... midnight delivery is the result.

                            This is a sore subject for me. Last month, I had to help with final care of an unwanted horse. It wasn't pretty or pleasant. The closure of the slaughter plants had ripples that traveled widely.
                            Equus makus brokus but happy

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              Originally posted by hosspuller View Post
                              I'll stand corrected on the slaughter ban... The efforts of the various animal groups resulted in shutting down the US slaughter plants. Didn't seem to me that the plants wanted to go out of business. There ... Same effect as a ban.

                              The posted article touched on the plants shutting down's effect on horse prices. People don't abandon something valuable. Horse, cat, dog or object... But when the cost of disposal is more than the value... midnight delivery is the result.

                              This is a sore subject for me. Last month, I had to help with final care of an unwanted horse. It wasn't pretty or pleasant. The closure of the slaughter plants had ripples that traveled widely.
                              Closing the slaughter plants was very shortsighted, but not the only storm that hit the horse industry in the past two years.
                              We also had a good run of more and more people getting at the age and finances that they could follow their little kid's dream to have some luxuries and horses was one of them, so many, many people entered the horse game and created a great demand for horses and the services and supplies for them.
                              That indicated the market that we needed more of all that, so breeders geared up to service their respective markets and so we ended up with many horses, that when the industry stumbled with the slaughter closing losing the bottom and the economy falling out of bed and so losing many horse owners, all those horses don't have anywhere to go now, at any price.

                              As always the sensible people make the best arrangements they can, they are not the ones turning the horses loose to fend for themselves or shooting them.
                              Those find a way to do right for their horses thru selling very cheap or giving them away or to a rescue.

                              For the many other horses out there without homes and their current owners without a way to keep feeding them or any idea of what to do, those are the ones we need to try to reach and educate, so they don't go trying to shoot their horses.

                              I know that animal control will not and can't take care of providing for those unwanted horses, even of providing for euthanasia, because they barely have the resources now to do so for the millions of dogs and cats they handle right now.

                              I don't know what we will, as a society, do with those extra horses without homes.
                              We have not found a way with the dogs and cats, why would we think we will be any more successful with horses?

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I agree you find a lot more people now owning horses who don't seem to grasp what a commitment proper horse ownership is financially, time wise and in emotional energy. And we definitely have too many horses, and WAY too many low end horses. Is that the horses' fault? Not at all, but the people who breed them.

                                Humane paid-by-owner slaughter or euth are the only humane answers. Humane slaughter is hard to find for intelligent, tuned in animals like horses. But if there was a reliable, stress free (as possible) slaughter method that fed zoo animals, dogs, and other carnivores, I could stomach it. NO pay to the animal owner, just the option of humane slaughter and usefulness of the animal after death, keeps people from "slaughter for profit", which causes a lot of the inhumanity of people looking to make a buck, and allows the facility to put all earned monies into making the slaughter procedure as stress free as possible to the horses.

                                And people who think euthing equines like they do for other "surplus, unwanted" pets is just too wrong, well, it is. It is wrong for all those pets, not just horses. But it is the most humane option we can offer, and better than chronic neglect. The only answer is less animals. Until producers figure that out, the animals of course suffer.
                                I'm not really at the top of my game today. I'm not even exactly sure what game I'm supposed to be playing, in fact... or where it's being held...

                                My horse's antics iamboyfriend.com

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  How do they know it wasn't a random "thrill" shooting by some sick freak? People have been abusing and abandoning horses forever. I watched a horse in my care die from a mysterious bullet wound in 1982.

                                  Skinny horses? Aside from hoardings, virtually every skinny horse I've met, and I have met a few, were skinny due to owner ignorance, indifference or stupidity.

                                  Most recent case in point: my next-door neighbor. He called one day and talked to me about his 30-year-old gelding that is losing weight and said he didn't know if the horse would make it through winter. The horse is out in a field with bad winter grass, no shelter, no hay and a once-daily grain that he cannot chew. It's been a really cold winter.

                                  The guy has a big barn and he can afford to feed the horse but is too lazy too give him beet pulp or pelleted feed, even if it's free (I offered). He also refused multiple offers for a good blanket to keep the old horse warm. Reason? It's just too much trouble for him.

                                  Oh, and then there was the Friesian breeder I met in December. Her barn was full of horses standing foot-deep in filthy stalls, locked in a dark barn with no turnout or lights. There was a tiny courtyard full of skinny, wormy weanlings and yearlings that had never had a hoof trim. The people own 80 acres in a choice real estate in a Colorado valley, but couldn't be bothered to build a fence or even a paddock, let alone hire a farrier to trim their $12,000 babies. I offered a few hundred dollars for a bony QH mare, because I felt so sorry for her and thought I could rehab her. The owner was offended and eventually she put a curse on me (I have the curse in writing).

                                  One of the skinny Thoroughbred situations I looked into last winter turned out that the horses were owned by a large equestrian center with ample means to feed and care for them. They just dumped them in a pasture down the road and didn't care enough to feed them properly, let alone blanket.

                                  I could go on and on.

                                  I realize a lot of people are struggling financially, but I think a many people are also DEVOID OF ANY MORALS OR SELF RESPECT.
                                  Last edited by LarkspurCO; Jan. 23, 2010, 11:33 PM.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by LarkspurCO View Post
                                    I realize a lot of people are struggling financially, but I think a many people are also struggling morally.
                                    "Struggling" morally implies that they are TRYING.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by LarkspurCO View Post
                                      The owner was offended and eventually she put a curse on me (I have the curse in writing).
                                      Ok, now I want to know.... what was the curse? Did it work? Can you post the curse, or would it only work if you publish it?

                                      I love fruit cakes!!
                                      I'm not really at the top of my game today. I'm not even exactly sure what game I'm supposed to be playing, in fact... or where it's being held...

                                      My horse's antics iamboyfriend.com

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by nightsong View Post
                                        "Struggling" morally implies that they are TRYING.
                                        Sorry, my mistake. What I meant to say was some people are just completely lacking morals, and making no effort whatsoever.

                                        Better now?

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