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  • #21
    "I just dont understand how someone could take an animal and not research a little bit beforehand. WHAT were the grandparents thinking?? And who would sell a 14 month old filly to someone for two young (grade school age) girls!?"


    Originally posted by saultgirl View Post
    What does that have to do with anything?
    It has to do with people who buy a horse without researching anything about care,feed and age appropriate riders/horses. It happens all the time and sometimes with a disaster.

    No need to be snarky.
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."

    Comment


    • #22
      Originally posted by Iron Horse Farm View Post
      Oh, I know! I was threatened with a lawsuit once (UAW free lawyer drafted a lovely letter to me) when a seemingly lovely couple came to my place to look at a rescue/rehabbed pony that was RESCUE priced to a good home. They were horse knowledgeable, good fencing etc. I tought it would be perfect. THREE MONTHS later, their darling daughter no longer wanted a white pony, she wanted a paint pony. Would I take her back? I offered to resell her or take her back, but they wanted full purchase price returned so that they could buy darling what she really wanted. I got the letter when I turned down their offer.
      *head*desk*head*desk*head*desk*

      Even from a BUSINESS perspective that would be stupid. When Sweetums turns 17 are they going to buy her a car and then expect a full refund from the dealer 3 months later when she decides she doesn't like the color?

      Suggest they invest in some demi-permanent hair color. Then she can have a piebald or a skewbald, depending on what outfit she wants to wear today.
      Author Page
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      Steampunk Sweethearts

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      • #23
        The grandparents were probably thinking, "they can grow up together!" How often have we heard THAT one?

        I had a green rider ask my advice about buying a horse. Told her what anybody sane and who has been around horses for a while would tell you, about 10-12, gelding, not to expense, not too cheap. Something that's been trail ridden..yada, yada, yada. What does she buy? A 5 year old greenie. I asked her why? "He's pretty and I like him."

        Sometimes there is nothing you can do.

        Comment


        • #24
          May not have been an unscrupulous seller... could've just gone down to the local livestock auction and picked out a cute pony for precious, totally not understanding that cute pony was actually an unbroke baby. Doesn't excuse them for not doing a little research, but I could easily see it happening.
          ---
          They're small hearts.

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by Iron Horse Farm View Post
            I have babies for sale - BIG warmblood babies. I can't tell you how many times I have gotten the call or e-mail asking if my 14 hand weanling was a good 1st horse for an 8 and a 6 year old child. Especially after Oldenburg was the featured breed in Horse Illustrated. ..uuuh, no, go get riding lessons for about two years before you respond to another ad! (I was called mean too!)
            Haha, Horse Illustrated!!! I remember someone getting a subscription to that magazine for me when I was younger. I was, admittedly, a bit of a horsey kid snob because my grandma was a horse trainer, but that magazine is generally not geared towards experienced horse people, and I knew that even as a beginning rider and didn't much care for it = ) I got a huge chuckle thinking about all the non-horsey families who'd gotten that magazine as a present for horse crazy kids, then thought they MUST go out and get whatever was featured as breed of the month - 17hh oldenberg... Oh! But wait! We'll get a baby because it's smaller and cheaper and then he can grow up with little Sally and they'll be best friends.

            I'd say you did the right thing, though it would have been most helpful if you could put her in touch with someone in the area who could give her kids lessons, put 30 days into the horse if it needed handling, and help them sell it to someone that wouldn't take it to the KB auctions. Perhaps you did, and that's probably the best thing you could do. Hopefully they find someone to keep them all from getting hurt (mom, kids, horse).

            Also, this forum does tend to be safety conscious, but that's a good thing. There are a lot of beginners out there that didn't die from riding a 1.5 yr old and "training" it themselves at a young age, but it's a bad situation, and it increases the horse's chances of going to worse and worse homes (craigslist - free! ah!) Just because some people get lucky and don't get badly hurt or some horses get really lucky and don't end up neglected down the road, doesn't mean this is an okay situation. It could end up okay, but it will more likely end up very bad for the horse or the kids.

            And I will never understand how some people pick horses for their kids. I had to work with this 4 year old arab cross pony horse thing that was barely broke to ride... His owner was an 8 year old beginner... But the thing that killed me (because this kind of thing happens all the time with beginners) was that the 26 year old experienced eventer cousin was the person who helped pick out this horse... What??? And the dad fancied himself a trainer of some sort, but I think his only reasoning behind this was because he was the dad and is therefore supposed to be the source of knowledge for his daughter on all things? Because he couldn't ride his way out of a paper bag and knew nothing about horses besides things he'd learned on a handful of trail rides. This poor little horse was so confused and green. And I only had about a month to work with the two of them before I HAD to quit where I was working or lose my mind...

            Luckily, this little girl is a great talent, and they've now moved on to gorgeous hunter ponies at an excellent barn where she's doing fabulously. But who knows what happened to that first little arab cross? I'm not in touch with them much anymore, but I wouldn't be surprised if their first "trainer" convinced them to sell him at one of the shady little auctions where said trainer likes to dump "inappropriate" horses. That's actually how I got my current horse. Same barn, slated for the same auction fate...

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by mishmash View Post
              I just dont understand how someone could take an animal and not research a little bit beforehand. WHAT were the grandparents thinking??
              Human superiority complex Many people really do not believe domestic animals are anything but docile reflections of human intentions. How hard can it possibly be to train or handle a horse or dog? It's not brain surgery, it's just an animal.

              I'm glad you said something. It sounds like the parents already suspected the truth, but enough horse people confirm it and they'll be more likely to straighten out the situation now, before the horse goes bananas and the kids get airlifted to a hospital.

              Comment


              • #27
                If I overheard this sort of thing, I'd put my fingers in my ears and go running for the door. A TOTAL MYOB moment.
                I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry

                Comment


                • #28
                  I know some people who were not horse smart and their daughters wanted to ride. They paid alot of money for highly inapproriate horses that were not nice horses. These girls became so frustrated that now the don't ride .....even after the purchase and ungrading to a fancy horse facility. It is so sad because their parent is obviously a horse loving parent that wanted to really foot the bill to get into this game big time without a clue about horses. I expect the horses scared the daughters off. Think if they had been matched with the right horses at the right stage this might have grown into a wonderful family owned facility. The poor father just keeps getting advicee from people in the indusrty dthat no ones respects and then he gets bad advise and doesn't know enough to know who to listen too. This has clearly become his hobby now and he likes hanging around the barn but is making beautiful fancy stalls before getting ring footing up to snuff. The best owners with the best horsesare staying away for now until footing is good and they feel the stable has clear operating plans so they can be assured their expensive horses will get the care they need. Anyhow my point is....the right horses may have keep the kids in the circle and now they are missing out on a great sport at a great family owned facility that is now the best in the area. But its not filled because the real horsepeople wait to hear how it is flying. Very sad.

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by ESG View Post
                    Let me see if I understand you correctly. You're suggesting that the OP give this complete, clueless stranger an indefinite amount of her time and expertise, for an indefinite period of time, put herself in probable physical jeopardy by handling a supercharged 14 month old TB who's been stallbound for god knows how long, and then presume to teach clueless stranger's young children how to safely do the same?

                    Ohhh-kay.

                    Your intentions are good, but your suggestion of how to execute them is completely ridiculous. Think twice before you type, eh?
                    If the OP is in a situation where she is able to give advice to others, then one must assume she is also in a position to understand what needs to happen and therefore be able to handle the supercharged 14 month old TB. If one can give advice on the needs of a 14 month old filly, then it is assumed one knows how to execute the advice.

                    Giving advice, and not being able to personally demonstrate the advice given is not a successful teaching style.

                    Talking the talk, and walking the walk type of thing.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Originally posted by Hoofprince in Mud View Post
                      If the OP is in a situation where she is able to give advice to others, then one must assume she is also in a position to understand what needs to happen and therefore be able to handle the supercharged 14 month old TB. If one can give advice on the needs of a 14 month old filly, then it is assumed one knows how to execute the advice.
                      You keep using that word "assume". I don't think it means what you think it means. (Hint; if I broke a leg and was on crutches or in a wheelchair, unable to handle a skittish yearling, does that mean my knowledge of HOW to handle said yearling must also have fallen out of my brain? No.)
                      Originally posted by HuntrJumpr
                      No matter what level of showing you're doing, you are required to have pants on.

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        I once met a woman in a tack store who had a similar story. Bought a two year old colt for her 12 year old granddaughter to train, and to for both the 12 year old and the 6 year old granddaughter to ride. This woman knew nothing about horses. She asked me whether she needed a soft brush or a hard brush in order to groom the horse. Knew nothing about the very rudimentary basics of horsecare. And she was the one who was providing for the horse. I brought up the same point that you did. How did she answer? Oh, she (the 12 year old) is a good rider.

                        Kill me now. I just can't imagine this mindset. I've taken lessons since I was a kid, and have been around horses for a while, but even I would be nervous owning a horse for the first time, and providing for it's sole care. I would first read everything I could get my hands on about horse care and health before I would even consider such a purchase. When I am financially stable enough, I will own a horse. But you better believe I will have read every book about horsecare that I could get my hands on.

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Originally posted by mishmash View Post
                          I don't even know these people-when I left they were in the process of getting numbers of boarding barns.
                          If the woman thought I was lecturing her, so be it. At least I let her know she was putting her kids in danger, and not doing the horse any favors, either. Hopefully she got the message a young horse has different issues, needs and training concerns than a puppy.
                          Around this BB, it's darned if you do and darned if you don't. If I hadn't spoken up, would be getting slammed for that....
                          I think you did the right thing. You met someone who was doing something ill-advised. You asked them if they minded advice. They didn't. So you spoke out of personal experience/years of knowledge to help them. You did the right thing. You hopefully made them aware that the course of action they are pursuing may not be the wisest. You didn't insult them, nor were you rude. You simply told them that they probably weren't doing the wisest thing. If they thought you were lecturing... well everyone has had that happen to them before. Honestly, I don't think it's too big of a deal.

                          I also think it's ridiculous that people would suggest you go out of your way to help a total stranger train their horse. If you want to volunteer that, that's awesome. But honestly? It's a stranger, you have no connection to them, and I'm sure you have better things to do.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            If the OP is in a situation where she is able to give advice to others, then one must assume she is also in a position to understand what needs to happen and therefore be able to handle the supercharged 14 month old TB. If one can give advice on the needs of a 14 month old filly, then it is assumed one knows how to execute the advice.

                            Giving advice, and not being able to personally demonstrate the advice given is not a successful teaching style.

                            Talking the talk, and walking the walk type of thing.
                            Any of us can explain to the woman in the OP's post why a 14 month old filly is not a good idea for a child. However, it's downright poor advice to suggest that because one knows and can explain why it's not a good idea, that they should accept the LIABILITY for handling the situation.

                            The OP is not the one that bought a 14 month old filly, therefore she is not required by ANY stretch to be in a position to "handle" it. She may well BE able to personally demonstrate the advice given - but it may NOT be a good idea. And it is NOT her problem.

                            Furthermore, she suggested consulting a professional. You know, someone whose job it is to handle these situations?
                            ---
                            They're small hearts.

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Originally posted by Sku View Post
                              I once met a woman in a tack store who had a similar story. Bought a two year old colt for her 12 year old granddaughter to train, and to for both the 12 year old and the 6 year old granddaughter to ride. This woman knew nothing about horses. She asked me whether she needed a soft brush or a hard brush in order to groom the horse. Knew nothing about the very rudimentary basics of horsecare. And she was the one who was providing for the horse. I brought up the same point that you did. How did she answer? Oh, she (the 12 year old) is a good rider.

                              Kill me now. I just can't imagine this mindset. I've taken lessons since I was a kid, and have been around horses for a while, but even I would be nervous owning a horse for the first time, and providing for it's sole care. I would first read everything I could get my hands on about horse care and health before I would even consider such a purchase. When I am financially stable enough, I will own a horse. But you better believe I will have read every book about horsecare that I could get my hands on.
                              Sku, my first horse was Dumplin'. Almost 30 years old and a tiny mini. It was DD's first horse too. I wouldn't have done it any other way! I have spent my entire life doing everything in my power to learn, learn, learn in preparation for the day that horse would come.
                              I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

                              Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by Trixie View Post
                                Furthermore, she suggested consulting a professional. You know, someone whose job it is to handle these situations?
                                In the horse world, a professional is a person who receives pay for their work. It has no reflection of their ability to handle a particular situation.

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  In the horse world, a professional is a person who receives pay for their work. It has no reflection of their ability to handle a particular situation.
                                  Yes, but paying a professional indicates someone who will then be taking responsibility for the liability.
                                  ---
                                  They're small hearts.

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by Hoofprince in Mud View Post
                                    If the OP is in a situation where she is able to give advice to others, then one must assume she is also in a position to understand what needs to happen and therefore be able to handle the supercharged 14 month old TB. If one can give advice on the needs of a 14 month old filly, then it is assumed one knows how to execute the advice.

                                    Giving advice, and not being able to personally demonstrate the advice given is not a successful teaching style.

                                    Talking the talk, and walking the walk type of thing.
                                    This just kills me. What a crock of sh_T. So by your reasoning, the OP needs to step up to the plate and gallantly put herself in harms way for a bunch of strangers just so she can show that she knows how to handle a rank filly because she gave them advice. Am I correct here? Also by your reasoning, anyone who doesn't offer to "walk the walk" has no business offering advice if they can't demonstrate it personally. If that is the case, then Ann Landers better watch out if she can't personally demonstrate how to kick out cheating husbands/wives, dirtbag children, etc. etc.
                                    Yogurt - If you're so cultured, how come I never see you at the opera? Steven Colbert

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Originally posted by ambar View Post
                                      You keep using that word "assume". I don't think it means what you think it means. (Hint; if I broke a leg and was on crutches or in a wheelchair, unable to handle a skittish yearling, does that mean my knowledge of HOW to handle said yearling must also have fallen out of my brain? No.)
                                      To be blunt and to the point. If an individual is in a position to give a advice, an opinion, a lecture, on any given topic, they have the moral responsibility to be able to demonstrate or prove their advice, opinion, or lecture.

                                      It is about being able to "talk the talk, and walk the walk".

                                      If you can't walk, then you are in no position to advice other on the topic, despite the fact you have opinions.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        Originally posted by Trixie View Post
                                        Yes, but paying a professional indicates someone who will then be taking responsibility for the liability.
                                        I'm not so sure if this is true, given the number of horse professionals who suffer body damage, and don't have the insurance to cover their liability, and thus, need donations to cover their bills.

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Originally posted by Mtn trails View Post
                                          This just kills me. What a crock of sh_T. So by your reasoning, the OP needs to step up to the plate and gallantly put herself in harms way for a bunch of strangers just so she can show that she knows how to handle a rank filly because she gave them advice. Am I correct here? Also by your reasoning, anyone who doesn't offer to "walk the walk" has no business offering advice if they can't demonstrate it personally. If that is the case, then Ann Landers better watch out if she can't personally demonstrate how to kick out cheating husbands/wives, dirtbag children, etc. etc.
                                          Ann Lander's advice is solicited from people. The original poster was offering unsolicited advice, at which point, good manners dictate, the speaker must know of what they speak.

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