• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Not too happy w/my riding instructor yesterday...

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    Originally posted by Aggie4Bar
    You will not get lead changes if you can't get the horse in a canter and keep it there, and you're not going to learn a thing from the packer that swaps leads at the mere suggestion of changing direction without any pilot input.
    No, it's much more fun to attempt counter canter on an older auto-change hunter/jumper! The instructor felt like I needed a challenge, and it was fun, though frustrating.

    Steph

    Comment


    • #22
      Good Point, but...

      Originally posted by Showponymom Aefvue Mid Atlantic Division
      By reading your profile that you are financially wealthy why don't you buy yourself a made horse and then you can learn everything with out worrying about how the horse will be.

      As said before you learn from riding different types of horses. Not all are going to be good but you will learn something.
      I had a beautiful "made" horse in the past who was a fantastic mover, automatic changes, perfect spots, etc....and always had to carry a crop - rarely, if ever used it. I'd be curious to know how many riders who have an "A" or "AA" level horse don't carry a crop when they ride.

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by Foireann Eireannach
        I'd be curious to know how many riders who have an "A" or "AA" level horse don't carry a crop when they ride.
        I have an ammy adult jumper I show & I don't ride him with a crop. Maybe once a year or so he's gets an "attitude adjustment" whack, but that's about it.
        "I'm not crazy...my mother had me tested"

        Comment


        • #24
          What the heck is wrong with crop? Why did you refuse to carry it?

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by StefffiC
            No, it's much more fun to attempt counter canter on an older auto-change hunter/jumper! The instructor felt like I needed a challenge, and it was fun, though frustrating.

            Steph
            Hahaha... Touche. That is definitely a case where the auto changer becomes quite a learning experience.
            "I did know once, only I've sort of forgotten." - Winnie the Pooh

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by dianad
              Exactly. When I was teaching, if I had a whiny student who 'couldn't get the horse to do' what it was supposed to, I would say "If I can get on and get the horse to do ____, then who's problem is it?"

              My take, if you can't get a horse to go forward, you have no business learning lead changes. Your instructor is a saint.
              In one dressage lesson last year, we *did* do flying changes, and a little bit of haunches-in and shoulder-in, and a little medium trot across the diagonals, and other fancy stuff, on a horse who was *very* well trained, and an absolute blast to ride. Immediately afterward, my instructor let me do a "practice ride" on a draft-cross mare whose owner couldn't make it to the barn that day. I could barely get her to *WALK*! Since the mare is very touchy about whips, I was told to not carry one. The instructor looked over at me struggling, and said, "Tuck your seatbones under. As soon as you get your pelvis in the right place, she'll walk right out." Sure enough, I experimented a bit, and eventually figured it out. In our other rides after that, she went really nicely for me.

              Getting a horse to move forward, when either the horse is having a bad day, or one's body is giving it mixed messages is *much* harder than getting a well-trained horse to do a flying lead change.
              Stay me with coffee, comfort me with chocolate, for I am sick of love.

              Comment


              • #27
                Wow. Doesn't look like you're getting much sympathy here. And for some pretty good reasons, too. Sorry to chime in on the same note but from the scant information you provided the only ones I feel sorry for are the instructor and the horse - who is actually worse for having been ridden in this way.

                If your instructor offered to put you on a more 'challenging' mount and you accepted - then don't bellyache.

                Yes. Challenging does mean barn sour. Not forward. Stiff on one side or both sides. Bucky. Rearing. Not taking contact on the bit. Not stopping. Not leading. Not loading. Not respecting the handler/rider. Pushing through your hands. Ear pinning. Kicking out.

                Lots of things constitute 'challenging'. If you can't handle anything more than a saintly, forgiving packer then don't accept the 'challenge' next time. Challenging doesn't always mean hanging-on-for-dear-life to and super-schooled million-dollar horse.

                I have a nice little qh mare I trained from the ground up. My daughter won her barrel class on this mare last Sat. night w/a 17.0 - which is a respectable time in anyone's book... and no, is wasn't a 'small' pattern.

                This same mare - who will take off like no body's business - was ridden today by my 12yo begginner neice here in my yard. She could barely get Jules to walk... Jules would keep stopping.

                Now. Who's challenge is it? Who's problem is it? Who needs to improve????

                The rider. That's who. sylvia
                Never explain yourself to someone who is committed to misunderstanding you.

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #28
                  (sigh)

                  Ok, I'm not going to keep trying to defend myself, but if at the end of my lesson last week my instructor says "Ok, next week we are going to start working on lead changes"

                  Then the lesson comes and she puts me on a horse that hasnt been ridden in months, and I believe doesnt even KNOW lead changes. She didn't tell me before the lesson that this horse hadn't been ridden in months.... How is this ok?

                  I paid her to reschool her horse on basic riding commands. You wouldn't be upset about that? Isn't that kind of like paying for spanish lessons and the teacher teaches you french?

                  That was NOT a schooling horse. If I wanted to teach basic commands to a pasture sour horse, there are a dozen at my boarding stable I could ride for free. She was USING me to get her horse into selling shape, and apparently a lot of other students of hers feel the same way. And there are some hard core riders that she instructs- not princesses. And no I didn't learn anything new at that lesson. Not anything I haven't done 100 times on retraining basic commands to my rescued OTTB's.

                  Maybe I did not explain it correctly, maybe I did whine to much (I am pretty upset at the news I learned) but I'm telling you, what she did was not to benefit my riding skills.

                  And for whoever made the "financially free at 29 comment, why don't you take a look at my business plan and figure out what kind of effort and balls it takes to build my business to that level-THAN try and talk shit. If it were that EASY than wouldn't EVERYONE be at that financial level? I am proud of my accomplishments, cuz I went thru the trenches to get there. Instead of ripping on me, why don't you PM me and I can show you how to do it to.
                  I've got the 3 things men want. I'm hot, and I'm smart!

                  -The 6th Member Of The Bareback Riders Clique-

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by mzpeepers
                    My my, if you had been one of my students you sure wouldn't have lasted long with that little attitude. Perhaps it's why I don't teach anymore. You refused to use a crop? Your poor instructor must be a saint spending all that time chasing after the horse.
                    My one and only question... why won't you use a crop?

                    Since my guy has been injured, I've been riding the schoolies. Some nice, some not so nice. I have to admit, it has made me a better rider. I rode one of my instructors horses (not a schoolie) last week. I did feel a bit priviledged she let me ride him as he's green but quiet. It was interesting.... and definately a learning experience as my guy is more made. But I bought him because of that... I wanted to concentrate on myself and have something "pack" me around. If I wanted a greenie to ride, I would have bought one.

                    So my theory is... once my guy is better and going again, I'll be that much more of an effective rider than I ever was and he won't know what hit him!!!

                    With the greenie I rode, I'm sure she thought I'd like to ride him.... to be honest, not so much. He was fine but just not my cup of tea. But I chalked it up as another learning experience. But I have to admit, I can't wait until my guy is better and I can get back to riding him instead.
                    Last edited by LSM1212; Jun. 6, 2006, 02:59 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Originally posted by Foireann Eireannach
                      I had a beautiful "made" horse in the past who was a fantastic mover, automatic changes, perfect spots, etc....and always had to carry a crop - rarely, if ever used it. I'd be curious to know how many riders who have an "A" or "AA" level horse don't carry a crop when they ride.
                      I carried a crop at shows with my jumper. In 7 years used it...never that I can remember, but I wouldn't have gone in the ring without it. I carry one on my hunter all the time. He gets a tap to remind him that leg=forward. I remind him once, and he rememebrs for the rest of the session. Simple!
                      Originally posted by tidy rabbit
                      Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community.

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        review your lesson

                        Originally posted by alysheba
                        no matter how much kissing, clucking ad kicking

                        By the end of the lesson my legs were killing me, I hasn't learned a damn thing.

                        I think there are several things you might have learned from this lesson such as:

                        kissing is not the right "forward" aid
                        kicking only makes your legs tired and
                        perhaps you need some more personal physical conditioning

                        It would never occur to me to tell my instructor what to teach me. some days we work on half pass, some days on canter departs, and we always work on my postion.
                        A man must love a thing very much if he not only practices it without any hope of fame or money, but even practices it without any hope of doing it well.--G. K. Chesterton

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Originally posted by alysheba
                          I paid her to reschool her horse on basic riding commands. You wouldn't be upset about that?...She was USING me to get her horse into selling shape,
                          Reschooling her horse? Well, no, you didn't. You didn't teach this horse anything. Perhaps you trainer did think you could teach this horse something.

                          You sure showed her!!!
                          Originally posted by tidy rabbit
                          Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            You really missed out on an opportunity because, frankly, I believe you had a poor mindset when the lesson started going differently than you expected. Be flexible. You'll learn lots more!
                            http://www.angelfire.com/ult/irishmosaic/Dublin/

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Oh, do get OVER yourself!

                              Quit your whining.

                              Your instructor ASKED you if you wanted a more challenging ride, yes? And you accepted? Then belt up. Since when is it her job to give you the life story of every horse you ride? If you're going to learn to be a rider rather than a whiney @ssed passenger, better get used to having the occasional lesson like this. Be pleased your instructor thought you ready to handle something less push-button.

                              Actually, this horse sounds like exactly what you needed to ride. The instructor told you to carry a whip, and you refused. Then you wore yourself out trying to get this horse to move without one. Stings the ego a bit when you find you're not as competent as you think, doesn't it?

                              Who says you didn't learn anything?
                              In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
                              A life lived by example, done too soon.
                              www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by alysheba
                                Then the lesson comes and she puts me on a horse that hasnt been ridden in months, and I believe doesnt even KNOW lead changes. She didn't tell me before the lesson that this horse hadn't been ridden in months.... How is this ok?
                                I thought you said that a bunch of her other students had been on the same horse recently, and complained about him misbehaving with them, as well. I'm confused. Sometimes my instructor tells me, "Next week we will work on x," and it doesn't work out that way. Maybe the horse she was going to have you ride was already used in a lesson that day, and she re-considered and decided to see how well you did with a horse who needed some work. Perhaps she should have told you that at the beginning of the lesson, but I would have *planned* on switching gears as soon as I found out the horse was green.

                                I paid her to reschool her horse on basic riding commands. You wouldn't be upset about that? Isn't that kind of like paying for spanish lessons and the teacher teaches you french?
                                Nope, it's like paying for Spanish lessons, and the instructor discovering you don't understand the basic syntax, grammar, or pronounciation, and working with you on the basics, even though the lesson plan called for more advanced work. If you've retrained lots of other horses, why did this one give you so much difficulty?
                                Stay me with coffee, comfort me with chocolate, for I am sick of love.

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  I attempt to carry a dressage whip when I ride. It is not pretty-it is usually sticking straight out or caught under my saddle flap, but it is there in case I need it. And a few times I have had to remind Rothina it was there by tapping her with it. It is something my instructor insists on, especially on trail rides. Of course, she just throws her hands up in the air when she sees me attempting to carry it. But at least I have it.

                                  In the past, I have carried a crop- it was there if it was needed and the horse knew it was there.
                                  Co-founder of White Trash Dressage (WTD)
                                  http://www.lulu.com/mavw1971
                                  also available on Amazon.com
                                  http://www.cafepress.com/wtdressage

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    I have absolutely nothing positive to say here. So I think I'll keep my thoughts to myself. I do feel very sorry for the horse though.
                                    Meet Wendall the wonder horse
                                    and introducing Machado! http://pets.webshots.com/photo/28186...SDi?vhost=pets

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Perhaps the lesson your instructor wishes to teach you that day was HUMILITY.

                                      Horses are not machines to do your bidding. Being a great rider means you know how to communicate your wishes to the horse and make your wishes the easiest route for him.

                                      If you want to sit on something and look pretty, try a velvet dressing stool.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        I think youre looking at this all the wrong way. You can't always ride the perfectly-behaved top-level schoolmaster. This is a great learning experience!

                                        You complain about needing extra leg pressure but you decide not to carry a crop. If you had just used that crop confidently once or twice at the right moment, the horse would've taken you more seriously.

                                        There are also common mistakes in riding that will encourage a horse to drop out of a trot. I don't know what kind of rider you are... maybe you are an excellent rider, so I don't mean any offense. It's just that some horses sense the rider's sudden change in balance, stiffness/tension, or changes in seat to mean "slow down"
                                        Veterinarians for Equine Welfare

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          That is the sort of horse that REALLY teaches you how to ride!

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X