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College Ideas For Kid Who Wants To Ride At School (NOT EQUINE MAJOR)

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  • #21
    I think that it's wonderful that she wants to continue riding while in college and it will be a healthy outlet for her stress. Please encourage her to continue riding even if she has to do a working student program or a lease program. She will be a more well-rounded person in the end because of it. The biggest mistake I made when going to college, was not working an outside job, like I did in High School. As soon as I went to work, my grades and focus improved tremendously. If I had had a horse, it would have been the same thing.

    It's a shame that the Dad wants to sell her horse. This is such an emotional and transistional time in a young person's life, and I'm sure part of the reason for not wanting to make the decision is the loss of her horse.

    Oklahoma State University has a wonderful equestrian program, and there are lots of horses in this area of the country and riding in the winter is not terribly bad (usually). They have a good educational programs as well and its a nice campus. Board and rates are usually not too high in this part of the country either, and pasture boarding is readily available.
    Unashamed Member of the Dressage Arab Clique
    CRAYOLA POSSE= Thistle

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    • #22
      What about the University of Virginia? It's a fantastic school academically in a great city. The IHSA team I believe still rides at The Barracks, but if she has a car there are plenty of stables around, from eventing to dressage to hunters.

      I'd also check out University of Vermont. I loved it when I went to visit. It's a nice size - 8,000 undergrads if I remember correctly, and I loved the co-op system of their barn on campus. I was only put off by the distance from home (haha I now go to school across an ocean!) and the cold.

      While it is harsh that her parents are making her sell the horse, it actually might be better for her in the long run. I had a horse my freshman year, and while I don't regret it, and she did help with the transition, I actually found it way too much to have her and keep up with academics for the one semester of soph year I spent there. I went to a school a long drive from home (as in too far away to go home for weekends) and I didn't know a single person. It was difficult, but an experience I'm really glad I had. I ended up transferring because I couldn't handle the academic load, pressure from professors, and trying to have a social life. First semester of my sophomore year went downhill after fall break and didn't improve. I ended up choosing to "study abroad" a semester early, even though I knew I probably wouldn't be going back. I absolutely loved the university I spent a semester at, and a year later I'm still there and much happier. It's 20,000 undergrads. When I looked at colleges I refused to look anywhere bigger than 5,000 - except UVM - because I thought I wouldn't be happy there/I'd be too overwhelmed.

      From my experiences, I'd strongly encourage her to do OVERNIGHT STAYS at different types of schools. I really really wish I had done an overnight stay at a big university and actually attended a class in a lecture theatre. I think I would've realised it's actually not that scary. Another positive of overnight stays is she can check out the riding options while she's there. Schools are also pretty good at matching people up, so she could stay with another rider.
      "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
      "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Blkarab View Post

        It's a shame that the Dad wants to sell her horse. This is such an emotional and transistional time in a young person's life, and I'm sure part of the reason for not wanting to make the decision is the loss of her horse.
        Uhmmmm, maybe Dad feels he won't have money left over after forking out $25K for tuition? Riding in college is a HUGE luxury, IMHO; I'd be looking for a smaller IHSA school (e.g. Bard, Amherst, Skidmore, Kenyon).
        "Go on, Bill — this is no place for a pony."

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        • #24
          I went to Vassar and absolutely loved it. She could chose to ride anywhere from once a week with the team, to every day. There are kids that board at the team barn, so getting a ride out to the barn was never a problem, though everyone who wants to can have a car. Academics are fantastic- good med/law/vet placement rates and great liberal arts programs. I'd be happy to answer questions if she is interested.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by katie16 View Post
            In trying to think of Northeast schools that were not Ivy League (as the kid seems to be intimidated by the idea) I thought of Boston College and Tufts. I don't know anything about riding there, but figured there are so many barns in the area that there must be someplace she could find to ride. What about Stonehill?

            Just thinking of schools I know people have gone to that I think might work!
            BC and Tufts both have riding teams, also a good school in that area is BU, I know someone on the riding team there who really enjoyed it. I was going to suggest Stonehill, too - if she's interested in science, they have a great new science center opening up in the fall. The team there is very competitive in their region and a great group of girls.

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            • #26
              Come to Rutgers, New Brunswick!
              1. IHSA team, western AND english
              2. Student run mounted patrol
              3. Driving distance to Anne Kursinski, Emil Spadone, etc etc.
              4. Grease trucks! (Ok, not horse related, but still cool!)
              Do not take anything to heart. Do not hanker after signs of progress. Founder of the Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.

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              • #27
                I second the University of Virginia. Although I was too busy for them, I did find a decent number of other places to ride outside the school, including a woman with lovely eventers who wanted someone to ride her horses for free. My last year I ended up joining the polo club because it was close by and cheap. If you can't afford the polo club's low fees, they will work something out. It was hugely addictive and fun, and not something I would ever have done otherwise. I also think now that it was good to be doing something new because I couldn't be upset that I wasn't doing as well as I had been or pressure myself about making progress at the same pace. It was pure stress relief and fun.

                The school has a distinct character which she may or may not like (totally a personal preference thing) Even for out of state it's relatively "affordable" and there's a little bit of everything there. It has both a real town and close countryside, and isn't prohibitively far from Richmond and DC.

                My dad also still hasn't gotten over that I didn't go to an Ivy League school, but whatever. I get to be very happy with where I went and the things I learned there and the friends I made for the rest of my life; he can be kind of disappointed about it and bring it up once a year. I'll take that trade off Parent opposition is so daunting while you're at home, but becomes far more tolerable once you leave for school, and even easier when you are away full time.
                Last edited by halla; Mar. 16, 2009, 05:58 PM. Reason: extra thought

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                • #28
                  I went to Wilson College...private liberal arts... They have a lot of great majors, but they also have Equestrian Studies...IHSA, Intercollegiate dressage team, eventing team, western team, drill team, etc. Even if they want to major in something other than horses, they can still ride. Also, equestrian facility right on campus, 2 indoors, outdoor, XC course in the works, 3 barns. Students can board their own horses right on campus or there are plenty of schoolies to ride!!

                  www.wilson.edu
                  Jessica Bortner-Harris
                  www.rockystartstables.com
                  "Throw your heart over the fence and your horse will follow."

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                  • #29
                    In the Northeast:

                    Colgate University
                    Hamilton College
                    St. Lawrence University
                    Skidmore College
                    Cornell University

                    All have excellent academics and very attractive campuses. All have excellent riding facilities, some with heated indoor arenas. All field competitive IHSA teams with well-respected coaches.

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                    • #30
                      I'll throw in the pitch for my alma mater/current grad school, UF. Although it is a VERY large state school, it's very highly ranked and no matter what she ends up deciding she wants to do, she can do it at UF. Sounds like she could easily be in the honors program, and the honors dorm was absolutely a FABULOUS way to do the first year of school. Small college feel on a university campus.

                      On the horse front, I know of several owners/trainers within a 15 minute radius of campus who need horses ridden and would happily have her ride for free if she's capable. If she wants to be on the school team, it's an option, but having done it, I'd advise against it. There's better coaching and cameraderie to be had in a private barn setting.

                      I agree with those who have advised overnight visits to campus, and serious evalution of the schools on their own merits before considering the horse issue. All that said, UF has great weather, location, school spirit, and is surrounded by horse country.

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                      • #31
                        Originally posted by halla View Post
                        I second the University of Virginia. Although I was too busy for them, I did find a decent number of other places to ride outside the school, including a woman with lovely eventers who wanted someone to ride her horses for free. My last year I ended up joining the polo club because it was close by and cheap. If you can't afford the polo club's low fees, they will work something out. It was hugely addictive and fun, and not something I would ever have done otherwise. I also think now that it was good to be doing something new because I couldn't be upset that I wasn't doing as well as I had been or pressure myself about making progress at the same pace. It was pure stress relief and fun.

                        The school has a distinct character which she may or may not like (totally a personal preference thing) Even for out of state it's relatively "affordable" and there's a little bit of everything there. It has both a real town and close countryside, and isn't prohibitively far from Richmond and DC.

                        My dad also still hasn't gotten over that I didn't go to an Ivy League school, but whatever. I get to be very happy with where I went and the things I learned there and the friends I made for the rest of my life; he can be kind of disappointed about it and bring it up once a year. I'll take that trade off Parent opposition is so daunting while you're at home, but becomes far more tolerable once you leave for school, and even easier when you are away full time.
                        My daughter is a junior at UVA and loving it. She doesn't have her horse with her, although I sometimes wish she could load up some saddle bags and RIDE him down there and use him for transportation like Jefferson must have done Especially when gas was over $4! We are in Nokesville, so close enough for her to come home and ride every now and then but I understand that there are lots of riding opportunities in Charlottesville.

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                        • #32
                          Washington College! It's a very well respected school on the Eastern Shore of MD. I'm the captain of the hunt seat team here - we are all great friends and have lots of fun, on and off of the horses! If she wants to know more, PM me and I'll give you my contact info.
                          My CANTER cutie Chip and IHSA shows!
                          http://www.youtube.com/kheit86

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                          • #33
                            University of Maryland, College Park. The Ag school is small and friendly. She can take classes in any part of the University. There are lots of horsey students in the Ag School. UMD is near lots of event and dressage trainers. The school is reasonably priced and highly ranked. Several UMD students and faculty post on COTH regularly.

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                            • #34
                              Originally posted by DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho" View Post
                              Cornell is my alma mater. She can CERTAINLY ride there!!! Gorgeous campus, terrific academic program. Because there are sub schools (I was an Aggie - but there's Arts & Sciences, Ag & Life Sci, Labor Relations, Architecture, etc etc) there is a "small school" feel within the very large campus.

                              And of course, the vet school is there. Just sayin.'
                              I wholeheartedly agree! I wish I went there, but I am hoping for the next best thing...working there! My DD is hoping to be an aggie
                              I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

                              Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.

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                              • #35
                                University of Mary Washington and William and Mary both have Equestrian teams and strong academic profiles.
                                \"For all those men who say, \"Why buy the cow when you can get the milk for free,\" here\'s an update for you: Nowadays 80% of women are against marriage. Why? Because women realize it\'s not worth buying an entire pig just to get a little sausage.\"-

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                                • #36
                                  Just as info for anybody interested, there will be a "College Night" presentation dinner with approx. 10 schools there to speak about their programs, both riding and academic. There will be plenty of time to talk to representatives and find out a lot about many schools in one place. This is being held in Manakin Sabot, Va. at the Old Dominion Horse Show. You can email Happymouthmedia@comcast.net for more info.
                                  www.midatlanticeq.com
                                  Mid-Atlantic Equitation Festival,Scholarships and College Fair
                                  November 11-13, 2016

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                                  • #37
                                    I only read the first page of this thread, but I'm heading to college in the fall so I thought I'd chime in.


                                    I currently pay for board and lessons and such for my horse, and had an agreement with my parents that when I went to college the horse would be sold.
                                    However, my parents have a "set budget" on what they are going to contribute to my college expenses. The school I'm going to has given me in-state tuition because of my major choice and it is under the amount my parents are willing to contribute. My dad has agreed to pay for my horse while I'm in college since I am not using all of the 'college fund' money. I was very happy


                                    Perhaps she could see if her parents would agree to letting her keep the horse if she got a good scholarship? Say, if she receives a scholarship for X amount, they will keep the horse?
                                    Or, would they be open to letting her keep the horse if she pays for it's board and stuff? That might be another option if she was open and able to do that, if her parents let her.

                                    Good luck! I know I was worried about what would happen to my horse when I went to college... for me riding wasn't important so much as going to a good school though.
                                    "People ask me 'will I remember them if I make it'. I ask them 'will you remember me if I don't?'"

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                                    • #38
                                      Originally posted by Milocalwinnings View Post

                                      Perhaps she could see if her parents would agree to letting her keep the horse if she got a good scholarship? Say, if she receives a scholarship for X amount, they will keep the horse?
                                      Or, would they be open to letting her keep the horse if she pays for it's board and stuff? That might be another option if she was open and able to do that, if her parents let her.
                                      Its a sweet idea, but if her parents' bottom line is the prestige of her school, she probably won't be able to find a place that lives up to their expectations and will give her a sizable scholarship.

                                      I'd reccomend Tufts...great school, great name-recognition (for the parents) and an active IHSA team.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        Jn4Jenny - that book is GREAT and helped me out tremendously. I second your recc!

                                        Is she set on riding on a team through the school? If so, the first school that comes to mind is UVM - they have a huge farm, the town is great, and I would've killed to go to the school - if I'd had a hope of affording it.

                                        I'd suggest she think about looking for a place to ride outside of the college itself, though. If you have the money for a team, great - but also consider that some teams require lessons, certain amounts of time spent at the gym, trips to shows on weekends - it can be difficult to work in with a college life. I'm a music major, and concerts and rehearsals virtually eliminated the prospect of a riding team for me.

                                        I go to Westfield State College in MA. I was lucky enough to find a barn 15 minutes from campus. The owner of the barn is wonderful, and offered me the chance to go down and ride in exchange for giving the horses some one-on-one time and doing barn chores - cleaning tack, etc. There is no schedule, and I never have the pressure of having to show up - a good thing, because my schedule changes daily.

                                        One thing to consider is the area the school is in - Westfield is very 'country' and there are a lot of backyard barns out there. Boston, not so much! At the same time, the school itself needs to be right for her - that's the most important part. She can likely find a way to ride just about anywhere, but if she hates the school, she probably won't be happy anyways.
                                        Dapplebay - home of original equestrian clothing and accessories.

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                                        • #40
                                          Originally posted by twobays View Post
                                          Its a sweet idea, but if her parents' bottom line is the prestige of her school, she probably won't be able to find a place that lives up to their expectations and will give her a sizable scholarship.

                                          I'd reccomend Tufts...great school, great name-recognition (for the parents) and an active IHSA team.

                                          Not necesserially... I have a few friends who have gone to some great schools (Cornell is one I know of off hand) who have gotten full scholarships. They are out there, you just have to know where to look.
                                          "People ask me 'will I remember them if I make it'. I ask them 'will you remember me if I don't?'"

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