• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

When to give up? (long, need advice)

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • When to give up? (long, need advice)

    I have a big, ongoing problem with my mare Pixie and need some advice. Tempermentally, she's a challenging, insecure dominant type and about a year ago I moved to a barn with a trainer up to helping me with her abysmal ground manners (riding was never the problem, just everything else). She made good progress and I was learning how to be the "alpha bitch" in our herd of two. I was riding her, w/t/c, and we were even starting to work on same basic lateral work.

    Then, last summer, she got a laceration to her LF deep flexor tendon sheath, had surgery, was at the state vet school for 3 weeks and on strict stall rest about 2 months total. At that time, the vet that did the surgery was optimistic that she would be return to a rideable level of soundness. We did another two months of hand walking and gradually increasing turn out. At that point, my regular vet cleared Pixie for return to normal work. I was not really given a schedule like for rehabbing from tendon injuries, just general advice to take it slow and watch for any signs of soreness. So, in October my trainer and I started with gentle groundwork (lunging at the walk, big circles, a bit of trotting). At this point, Pixie was already cantering on her own in turn out and seemed to be feeling good and more than ready to get back to work. By November had worked up to more intensive sessions (some cantering). When my trainer tried to ride her, we had some head throwing issues that turned out to be her teeth (floating solved them). Pixie had about 2 weeks off and 4 weeks of light work in December and January, because of icy weather and the holidays. Right before the holidays, my trainer had observed that she seemed a little sore and that maybe a brief break would be good. At this point, we both assumed the soreness was just "normal" achiness from getting back into shape. And she did seem better after the break. But now, we just get into this pattern where day 1 Pixie is really fresh and full of energy with big leapy twisty bucks and no lameness, but the next day or the day after that she is really sore, almost lame. I don't think she's being overworked--even 30 minutes of w/t/c has her sore the next day.

    It's not the leg that she hurt that bothers her, it's the opposite front leg--when she's sore, she noticeably shortens her stride on the leg without really being lame (no head bob). I should note that last January, Pixie was diagnosed with mild navicular, but it seemed to be under control with increased turnout and changes in trimming. My trainer has said that she's just not the same physically as before the accident, that she never was so sore or so off. And her attitude is starting to go sour too, even on days where she seems fine. If something is hurting her, I can't say I blame her.

    My trainer and I both think the next step may be to treat the navicular more aggressively (eggbar or wedge heel shoes--please no flames or barefoot debates), but we are concerned that it could be something else, some other consequence of her injury (due to uneven weighting on the opposite leg for so many months?) Or maybe despite doing big leapy bucks in turn out, she just wasn't ready to go back to work? We've decided to try the shoes, but there's a big question mark about if it will work, and then what?

    And my trainer is seriously concerned that she may never be right, always have a good day, then a bad day. Last night, Pixie was sore again, so I took a lesson on one of the barn's school horses. At the end, my trainer observed that I looked so happy to be back on a horse (I haven't ridden since October, since I was putting all my time/money into rehabbing Pixie). He suggested that I may want to consider giving Pixie 6 months to a year off in pasture, see if she just needs more time. In the meantime, the BO has a few horses that might be suitable for me to ride, either as a partial lease or just as a horseless rider/riderless horse free lease arrangement. There are also 5 school horses of various levels, some quite nice, of a quality I could not afford to buy for myself. Trainer is concerned that my own skills are atrophying and that Pixie is hold me back. Not that I am going to the Olympics anytime soon, but that I could learn more.

    So here's the issue. I don't have unlimited funds to pursue diagnosing a mystery problem--hell, I'm still paying off all the bills from last summer. I think this could be hard to diagnose, because it's not every day (of course the horse will be sound when the vet comes out!). And it's possible that I could spend lots of time/money and still have a horse that is at best pasture sound and is tempermentally difficult. I'm committed to keeping Pixie for life (she's only 8) and fortunately, financially, I can afford it. But I am just not sure how much to pursue "fixing" her? Do I keep trying one option after another, up to and including majickal healing crystals? When do I draw the line? I even consider doing like BuddyRoo and doing the AC thing (just for fun of course). Or do I let her be a pet and get my riding from other horses? Pixie is out of my beloved first horse Missy. I only retired Missy around 2 years ago, and now Pixie.

    Last night, my trainer said he thinks maybe I won't give up (even when most people would have long since move on) because I think it would mean I failed with the horse. Which is probably true. I am academically and professionally an overachiever, so giving up and failure aren't really part of my vocabulary. And there is a still the little girl part of me that wants to believe that if I just try hard enough, Pixie will make this miraculous recovery.....and go on to win big and fulfill all the dreams I had for when she was a little foal I just really love her, grumpy, aloof thing that she is and we enjoy all our grooming and hanging out time, but I just hate seeing her always being sore and the effect it has on her attitude. So I vacillate between wanting to throw all my resources at diagnosing and fixing and wanting to just enjoy hanging out, on her own terms and not working her, while maybe free leasing or taking lessons on other horses.

    So COTHers (if you're still reading this), have you ever been in a similar situation? What did you do?
    BES
    Proudly owned by 2 chestnut mares
    Crayola Posse: sea green
    Mighty Rehabbers Clique

  • #2
    Just off the top my head Im wondering if perhaps 30 min of constant work is too much to start back. Shes basically a pasture pet fitnesswise. Bucks/farts/leaps wont increase fitness. I have a young beast that grew too fast and hasnt muscled up yet + was underfed/not worked for a while. 30 min would have this guy on his knees gasping. 20 is pushing it with quite a bit of walking.

    Maybe try walk + a few trots and see what that does. 10 min max. If it happens again maybe cut to 8 min. Give it a few days at this level & see. Trial/error are your friends.

    Time off wont hurt but it doesnt sound like its the injury doing it. I think your right to keep working with her. Shes not old but shes not a spring chic either and it may take awhile to get back into shape.
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker

    Comment


    • #3
      I like your trainer's suggestion of a long period of time off. I'd pasture board her somewhere cheap for a year and just take lessons on the school horses or do a free lease.
      \"Non-violence never solved anything.\" C. Montgomery Burns

      Comment


      • #4
        Just off the top of my head...I'd be thinking chiro.

        My mare has twice now had stifle/suspensory issues and each time, due to compensation with the opposite side, she seemed to get her pelvis out of whack. A quick chiro adjustment seemed to solve the problem.
        A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

        Might be a reason, never an excuse...

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Originally posted by JohnDeere View Post
          Just off the top my head Im wondering if perhaps 30 min of constant work is too much to start back. Shes basically a pasture pet fitnesswise. Bucks/farts/leaps wont increase fitness. I have a young beast that grew too fast and hasnt muscled up yet + was underfed/not worked for a while. 30 min would have this guy on his knees gasping. 20 is pushing it with quite a bit of walking.

          Maybe try walk + a few trots and see what that does. 10 min max. If it happens again maybe cut to 8 min. Give it a few days at this level & see. Trial/error are your friends.

          Time off wont hurt but it doesnt sound like its the injury doing it. I think your right to keep working with her. Shes not old but shes not a spring chic either and it may take awhile to get back into shape.
          We did start with 10 minutes walk + a little trot back in October, working up to 30 minutes now. The soreness never really showed up until we were at at least 20 minutes.

          I should note that with this horse, getting her brain to the point that you can constructively work with her requires 10 minutes of "playtime," either lunging/free lunging, during which she runs, plays, leaps and then settles down. She's always been like this, even before the injury and trying to insist on anything before she has her playtime leads to a fight. I honestly never minded, so long as she settled down to paying attention and being reasonably compliant after her playtime. Her mother was the same way. I do sometimes wonder and worry what she's doing to herself with all the leaping around, both in turnout and on the lunge line, but there's not much I can do to stop her. It's not like she's in the acute injury phase, where sedation for handwalking is warranted. And actually, when we were in the handwalking phase, she was pretty good. Excited to be out and about, but she always kept her cool. My BO's 11 year old daughter helped me with the handwalking, which definitely wouldn't have happened if Pixie was a complete whacko to handle.

          Right when I started working her, she was pretty good as well, probably because she did get winded from more than a few minutes of trotting and didn't WANT to run. But as she's gotten fitter, it's like she wants to do more than she can handle, gets sore and then gets resentful.

          BES
          Proudly owned by 2 chestnut mares
          Crayola Posse: sea green
          Mighty Rehabbers Clique

          Comment


          • #6
            I would think that "playtime" is not good for her. Most horses don't self-regulate very well and when excited do more than they should.

            I would turn her out for a year, then start over. That is what I did with my mystery lameness horse, and he's fine now.

            During that time, i would focus on working to eliminate the heel pain.

            Comment


            • #7
              Take charge

              Stop listening to your trainer and call a vet. Your trainer may be very expereinced but they are not a vet and the endless speculating sounds like it driving you batty as you don't know what direction to head in.

              Your vet needs to see her when she is lame to get the diagnosis ball rolling.

              If your horse isn't lame when your vet visits this is what I would arrange with my vet:
              - work her for your 30 mins everyday for a week (until vet see's her lame)
              - everyday arrange to have the vet stop by as their first or last call of the day (or when they are driving by)
              - when vet arrives toss horse on the lunge and if she's lame great, the vet gets to see it and examine her. If she's not, vet charges you a call fee and leaves (no examination) and plans to return the next day

              Who knows what the next recommended step may be. You may want to haul her to a hospital for further testing. A year off to wait and see? xrays? blood work? Talk to your vet and discuss what you can afford.

              Comment


              • #8
                I agree with discussing options with your vet. Personally I'd get a referral from the vet to a teaching hospital--usually significantly less expensive, IME, and go from there. Prioritize the testing and do what you can afford.

                If that's not an option, the turnout for a year suggestion is a good one.

                I have to say, your trainer's "concern" that your "skills are atrophying" because the horse is "holding you back" sounds like a load of BS to me.

                There are thousands of us out there being "held back" by our horses, whether it's due to horse's age, soundness, ability, skill, whatever. Personally I have one horse, a former jumper, who can't hold up to the stress of regular jumping anymore. So we don't jump. Are my jumping skills rusty now? Hell yes. But I'm not atrophyied, or less skilled--just out of practice. I can only afford one horse, so we work with what we've got.

                Sometimes in life you ride to work on yourself, sometimes you ride to work on the horse. Right now your focus is on your horse.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Nicole, you've gotten great advice. And I am so, so sorry. You know, especially as the weather gets better, if you need an extra horsie hit, there is Ted. Just another thought, too: remember I told you about the activating your horse's core DVD? Maybe this would be a good time to make a pizza and DVD night and go over the book. It's not going to hurt and could help with whatever the issues are.
                  www.specialhorses.org
                  a 501(c)3 organization helping 501(c)3 equine rescues

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    BES, I've followed your posts about this mare for a long time.

                    I admire your love for her, and your dedication to her.

                    You know she has navicular, you know she had the injury last year. Frankly, I would probably turn her out at this point, too. Some diagnostics can be very helpful, and I'm not saying don't consult a vet... but eventually you just have to say "when."

                    And honestly sometimes some "down time" for 6-12 months is enough to get things sorted out.

                    I'd find a good farrier, and a good vet, and definitely keep them in the loop. I'd maybe get some lateral rads of her feet, and pull blood, so you have a "starting point" so to speak.... but perhaps stop there for now.

                    But don't feel guilty about wanting to give her some time off.

                    Good luck.
                    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Thanks to all for your advice.

                      I never in any way meant that I was going to take a trainer's word, no matter how experienced, over an experienced vet's. This post was based on a long conversation I had with the trainer last night, which basically boiled down to "you need to change something, because what we're doing is not working for you or the horse." He recommended a vet consult too and said we should hold off on more training until either a vet figures out what the problem is or Pixie has enough time off to heal on her own or both. His main concern was that since we've been careful to gradually increase the workload, back off whenever it gets to much and always seem to hit a wall at certain point, that something new is going on....either the navicular is dramatically worse than it was 6 months ago or it's some new problem or a combination. I think anyone who's been around horses knows that these vague, sometimes off, sometimes not problems can take forever to figure out, if you ever do.

                      What I'm really struggling with is how far to go. I can do eggbar/wedge heel/whatever special kind of shoes. I can do a basic vet consult and xrays. I could even maybe spring for some kind of injection (navicular bursa, hock, whatever the issue is) if it was a yearly maintenance thing. But after that....I know there are gazillions of options for both diagnostics and treatments. And that's not even considering massage, chiro, and all the other things I could try, none of it with any guarantee that it will work. There's always that one more thing to try that just maybe this time will be THE SOLUTION.

                      I spent in excess of 4K after she got hurt, I honestly stopped adding up all the expenses....the surgery, hospital stay, transportation to/from the vet school, weekly vet calls for a month to do bandage changes, plus a bunch of associated indirect costs (ie extra gas because I had to be at the barn more, more money on takeout because I was too busy to cook etc). I'm still paying it all off. Then I paid for half training to get her back into shape, not being at all confident about my ability to ride through the yahoo phase as the horse got fitter. Initially, I had hoped 30-60 days would be enough to get her mentally back in the program, so I could continue working from there. And unfortunately, I'm not made of money and I've already probably spent more than Suzie Ormond would think wise. I'm an MD/PhD grad student living off a mix of stipend and federal student loan money, so some of these costs will be spread out over the 15 years I have to pay Uncle Sam back after graduation, residency, specialty training are over. At least I'm in a field with good job prospects and a high salary after training is over, plus my student loans are considerably less than most medical students, which is why I can afford to keep Pixie the rest of her life, even if she is just a pastuer pet.

                      And there's a part of me that is so tempted to do what I can to make Pixie comfortable, and investigate the offer of the lessons/free lease. Because it was sooooo nice to ride last night. And I do miss it, and I've been focusing just on the horse for the last 8 months or so, partly out of financial reasons with all of Pixie's expenses and partly because I wanted to involved with all her care and not just go off with another horse. And I do know that not riding does lead to some loss of fitness/skills/balance even if you're active with other kinds of exercise....otherwise there wouldn't be all these "I'm a rerider, I used to be good but now I suck" threads I think my trainer meant it as a compliment. He said that I have a decent seat and hands, and make steady progress in my lessons, and that finding a way to ride, even if it's not my own horse, doesn't make me selfish. It's not like it's ever crossed my mind to just send Pixie down the road and go on my merry way with another horse. Once we got the "who's the alpha mare?" question settled, Pixie became more pleasant to handle...still quirky, still periodically tests me but she greets me at the gate, loves her grooming time, there's finally a bond there. I was so looking forward to being able to ride her again. But it's just not working out and I almost don't want to push her anymore. I just hate seeing her get better, get sore, get better with rest, and the thought of repeatedly trying the next thing and the next thing to diagnose/treat....I've known people that went down this road and I know it can be a long and frustrating process. And sometimes I think that so long as she has a full tummy, is reasonably comfortable and gets her treats and ear scratches, Pixie could care less whether I ever ride her again.

                      I'm not making any decisions today...just needed to vent and hear from clearer heads.
                      BES
                      Proudly owned by 2 chestnut mares
                      Crayola Posse: sea green
                      Mighty Rehabbers Clique

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I tried to call last night. I know you have the seminar tonight but will call later. I'm happy (well,not happy, but you know what I mean) to be a shoulder to field all the vents about this. It is very hard when your options are limited and your dreams go poof, or you just can't get the blaze going.
                        www.specialhorses.org
                        a 501(c)3 organization helping 501(c)3 equine rescues

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          what's the point of "trying stuff" if you have no idea what is wrong? it's clearly not the original injury since it's on an entirely different leg so "more healing time" doesn't make any sense. Ditto shoes- putting various shoes on without a diagnosis doesn't really make sense.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Mystery lameness's suck and can be a soul sucking money pit of desperation (I've been there). You have a very realistic view of how lameness diagnosis can go in a very bad and stubborn case (stop reading coth horror stories!) but please don't talk yourself out of it before you get started based on speculation.

                            As you stated, you don't need to start now, you can start in a year or when you finish school. Like you said she's probably very content being a horse. Now you on the other hand should work on making you happy and if that is keeping a lid on your finances and riding other horses, then do it. If it means spending some money on your mare now, then do it. This is a fun hobby after all.

                            A totally plausible happier lameness scenario - the vet isolates her sore area via nerve blocks, takes a couple xrays and you'll end up with a diagnosis and course of treatment in one stop. Or maybe not… but then maybe that's when you decide to take a break.

                            You do sound a little doomsday about your poor mare, like maybe preparing for the worst case so you won't be surprised (my favourite hobby ).

                            ETA - ditto what wendy said, that's an easy way to loose lots of time and money.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If it were me, I'd put her in a pasture and go back to riding other people's horses. Your horse is certainly not going to suffer or hate you or feel neglected. Find her a good place, visit her regularly and go ride other horses. In a year, get her out and start back to work slowly. See where it gets you.

                              I can't imagine a scenario where the vet will do some scan and magically produce a treatment that will render her rideable next week.

                              I watched my friend go through this for 2-3 years with her horse. Tore suspensory, healed, back to work oh so slowly. Retore. New problems. It went on and on. Scans, X-Rays, stall rest, lasers, special shoes. She finally just said "go be a horse" and kicked him out to pasture. We'll see where he ends up. Now she goes and takes lessons on other horses and enjoys not obsessing over her horses leg.

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Originally posted by Donkey View Post
                                You do sound a little doomsday about your poor mare, like maybe preparing for the worst case so you won't be surprised (my favourite hobby ).
                                If I sound doomsday....well it's also been a really crappy week, no month in addition to the situation with my horse. It's all non-HR stuff: grant writing has my advisor and half my lab in a tizzy (I'm responsible for a chunk of the writing plus a lot of fact/reference checking), the fact that I'm in my last year of thesis work with all the pressures it entails, a new upstairs neighbor in my apt that persists in letting their 18 month old child run on hardwood floors until 1030 or 11PM every night and starts again early in the morning, making noise which even heavy duty earplugs do not block.....and the property management is not taking any action. So I'm looking into how can I break my lease (something I have never done in the past) and go elsewhere, as my concentration and nerves are shot. So when my trainer wanted to talk last night about Pixie's issues...it seemed like what else is new, one more thing is going wrong and one more problem I can't really fix.

                                And I admit I have done a lot of searching on COTH trying to find threads of similar problems to my mare...and just find the horror stories
                                Proudly owned by 2 chestnut mares
                                Crayola Posse: sea green
                                Mighty Rehabbers Clique

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Mystery lameness issues really DO suck.

                                  What came through your post loud and clear to me is the need to do *something* more before you throw in the towel and turn the horse out for six months or a year.

                                  If I were in the situation you describe, I would definitely give the corrective shoeing a try. It can make a world of difference.

                                  After I sorted out the shoeing, I would also make myself ride the horse for a week or so - with the idea of either riding the horse through the issue or making it lame enough that the vet had something to diagnose. That's not fun, of course, but the on again/ off again scenarios are VERY hard for a vet to work with. I would try to make the horse sore enough that my vet could identify the problem. There is a lot they can do with diagnostics if they have real symptoms to go on. The NQR stuff is a LOT tougher.

                                  Then I would hope to get some definitive diagnosis. I would be willing to do blocks, xrays, and perhaps injections. I would be willing to try reasonable (2 week?) courses of anti-inflammatory therapy and perhaps a muscle relaxant like robaxin if indicated.

                                  I would hope that I would have something definitive at the end of that time. If not - at that point, I would seriously consider turning the horse out for an extended period. Tincture of time...

                                  And I would get myself something to ride, whether a lesson horse or a lease or whatever might be available. There is really nothing wrong with creating a situation where you can enjoy riding and progress in your training, even if you cannot currently do it on your own horse. This is a very expensive sport, not just in time and money but in terms of emotional investment. It is OK to afford yourself some saddle time that is all about you having some fun and building your skills.

                                  Best of luck.
                                  **********
                                  We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
                                  -PaulaEdwina

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    It sure sounds like a tough situation. I would consult my farrier and vet to try to figure out if it could be the navicular . She could have been compensating when she was injured and caused some inflammation that hasn't had time to heal properly and when she is ridden it is aggravated. If that isn't the case and the shoeing and vet aren't helping, I would try the chiro or some other alt. therapy. It can really make a huge difference in some horses.
                                    Depending on what the professionals come up with, would it be possible to try just hacking out lightly or go on a little trail ride? This might be better than ring work for her if she is mentally able to deal (sorry, don't know your background). Also, the change in footing could help. I used to exercise a hunter that got very ouchy when ridden in the sand ring, but if you took him out in the field he was fine. Neither vet or farrier could figure it out. I wonder if the sand became too packed in his feet and put pressure on the frog or something. Oh well, I don't think I'll ever know.
                                    If it comes down to it, I would try the year off. Even if she wasn't sound enough to do ring work or show, she might make a great trail horse. It all depends on the horse, some unlikely horses have found great careers as trail mounts. I wish you the best luck in finding a solution
                                    Just cause you move to Texas, doesn't mean you are a Texan. After all, if a cat puts her kittens in the oven, It doesn't make them Bisquits.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Lucassb View Post
                                      Mystery lameness issues really DO suck.

                                      What came through your post loud and clear to me is the need to do *something* more before you throw in the towel and turn the horse out for six months or a year.

                                      If I were in the situation you describe, I would definitely give the corrective shoeing a try. It can make a world of difference.

                                      After I sorted out the shoeing, I would also make myself ride the horse for a week or so - with the idea of either riding the horse through the issue or making it lame enough that the vet had something to diagnose. That's not fun, of course, but the on again/ off again scenarios are VERY hard for a vet to work with. I would try to make the horse sore enough that my vet could identify the problem. There is a lot they can do with diagnostics if they have real symptoms to go on. The NQR stuff is a LOT tougher.

                                      Then I would hope to get some definitive diagnosis. I would be willing to do blocks, xrays, and perhaps injections. I would be willing to try reasonable (2 week?) courses of anti-inflammatory therapy and perhaps a muscle relaxant like robaxin if indicated.

                                      I would hope that I would have something definitive at the end of that time. If not - at that point, I would seriously consider turning the horse out for an extended period. Tincture of time...

                                      And I would get myself something to ride, whether a lesson horse or a lease or whatever might be available. There is really nothing wrong with creating a situation where you can enjoy riding and progress in your training, even if you cannot currently do it on your own horse. This is a very expensive sport, not just in time and money but in terms of emotional investment. It is OK to afford yourself some saddle time that is all about you having some fun and building your skills.

                                      Best of luck.
                                      No need for me to say it again, my dear Twin said it perfectly. Hope things turn out well either way.. your horse is lucky that you are so thoughtful.
                                      "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
                                      ---
                                      The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Sometimes the left leg will hurt and the right leg will get sore when they compensate. Then you go to fix the right leg and the left gets sore.

                                        Turn her out to pasture and trail ride her. You'll both have fun and she will have the time to heal. Forget work for now, she's just not up to it. Long walks on trails with a little light trotting and cantering just might be what she needs. Sometimes the more you try to fix something the worse it gets.

                                        It sounds like your a good and caring rider and a horse to ride seriously shouldn't be a problem. There were many times I would have loved to have someone like you work with my horse on days I couldn't get out to the barn. Spread the word and a horse will come your way.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X