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Horse Milk....

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  • Horse Milk....

    What do you think?

    from:http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/hi/ne...00/4537499.stm

    Horse milk trots onto the menu

    Horse's milk could soon be available to pour over your cereal, according to a horse farm in Belgium that has started selling it across the world.

    The farm milks 60 horses on a regular basis, and says its milk-mad customers can't get enough of it.

    The healthy drink, which is low in fat and high in vitamins, is sold as a tasty alternative to cow's milk.

    The milk, described as sweet, thin and watery, is also made into tablets, shampoo and creams to treat eczema.
    Would you buy it? Drink it?
    The ultimate goal of farming is not the growing of crops, but the cultivation and perfection of human beings.

  • #2
    I've never bought it but drank it from my own to try. It tastes good has a real sweet taste to it like the article says the meat from horses is also sweet tasting. Not sure why that is for both?
    Quality doesn\'t cost it pays.

    Comment


    • #3
      Great -- a new way to produce orphan foals.
      Kendra -- Runningwater Warmbloods
      Home of EM Raleska (Rascalino/ Warkant) and Donatella M (Furstenball/ Jazz Time)
      'Like' us on Facebook

      Comment


      • #4
        Saw something about this on some show on the Food Network - maybe The F Word?? at any rate, it got the approval of the host and was duly tried in a custard and the result was proclaimed tasty, different than with cows milk but good anyway.

        I am not sure why it would produce orphans as they only milk the mares once a day, and only after the foals start eating 'real' food and are not totally dependant om momma for all sustenance. it would be the same as a milk cow - complete access to momma for the first 10-14 days, then share the milk.
        Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

        Member: Incredible Invisbles

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        • #5
          Hmm. Can commercially available kumiss be far behind?
          "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

          ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by sk_pacer View Post
            I am not sure why it would produce orphans as they only milk the mares once a day, and only after the foals start eating 'real' food and are not totally dependant om momma for all sustenance. it would be the same as a milk cow - complete access to momma for the first 10-14 days, then share the milk.
            I have no idea how this equine milking industry is set up, but I don't see how it could be cost-efficient if the mares are only milked once a day. Do you know what kind of mares are used? I'm imagining a very similar situation to PMU foals; mares bred for size (the bigger the mare, the bigger the udder), a lack of selective breeding, and foals as by-products. Granted, this is completely my conjecture. If someone can show me sources/ examples of how these businesses are run, please do.

            I worked on a dairy farm for two years. The calves were never allowed to nurse. They were usually separated from the cow before they even got up (they take a long time to get up, much longer than foals) when the cow was put right back into the herd. The milk from the fresh cow isn't put in the tank (to be sold) until after the colostrum is gone, so that's separated and fed to the vealers/ calves via bottles or buckets. Maybe dairy farmers near you do things differently, but I can tell you the above is common practice in New England.

            I share this not to be argumentatitve but rather to clarify things. I'd like to know how the horse milking industry is set up. Does anyone have any real experience with it here?
            Kendra -- Runningwater Warmbloods
            Home of EM Raleska (Rascalino/ Warkant) and Donatella M (Furstenball/ Jazz Time)
            'Like' us on Facebook

            Comment


            • #7
              hm, I do believe, horse milk is in some basic ways very similar to human milk (read that a long time ago)

              I don't think I would want it over cereal, but then again I don't drink much milk anyhow. I had canned goats milk once, which tasted like a goat smells...so horse should not be as bad.

              Horse milk is being used already, in cosmetics/natural remedies as well as in specialty nutrition. My Mom had bought it for my sister when she was battling cancer.


              I think the breed of choice is Hafflinger....

              Comment


              • #8
                They use Haflingers, it is very humane, and it is used quite a lot in Holland and Belgium. An uncle and aunt both drink it; their doctor recommended it. Can't remember which ailment it was for, but they said they can feel it if for some reason they don't drink it for a few days.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Isn't there a culture that drinks fermented mare's milk?
                  Mare's milk sounds more palatable than when PETA was pushing Ben and Jerry's to make ice cream out of breast milk.
                  I've never had it but I have heard that it's sweeter than cow's milk and other ruminant's milk. (goats, camels, etc)
                  County, maybe the difference in sweetness of milk and meat on a horse is because it's not a ruminant and we're more used to drinking from/eating mammals that have a different (and better working) digestive system? I always wondered the reason myself too...being a non-ruminant is the only difference that sticks out to me.
                  You jump in the saddle,
                  Hold onto the bridle!
                  Jump in the line!
                  ...Belefonte

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sk_pacer View Post
                    it would be the same as a milk cow - complete access to momma for the first 10-14 days, then share the milk.
                    That is definitely NOT how it works. Ever been to a dairy farm? It's heartbreaking seeing those tiny calves chained to those dog house things.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Never thought of that but very very possable certainly makes sense Misty Blue.
                      Quality doesn\'t cost it pays.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I've been to dairy farms owned one also, theres about 10,000 dairy cows in this township. To me whats heartbreaking is to see dead calfs because they weren't in those hutchs that are very sanitary, warm, and have a healthy enviroment to get started in.
                        Quality doesn\'t cost it pays.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by hansiska View Post
                          Great -- a new way to produce orphan foals.
                          There wouldn't necessarily have to be orphan foals. Premarin is made from pregnant mare urine, so by default there have to be foals. Once a mare has foaled, she will continue to produce milk if milked (even if the foal is weaned). So, she wouldn't necessarily have to produce a foal every year or even every other year. Will mares continue to make milk indefinitely if milked? Not sure of the duration.

                          Caitlin
                          Caitlin
                          *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
                          http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by county View Post
                            I've been to dairy farms owned one also, theres about 10,000 dairy cows in this township. To me whats heartbreaking is to see dead calfs because they weren't in those hutchs that are very sanitary, warm, and have a healthy enviroment to get started in.
                            I wasn't trying to start anything, just posted my gut reaction to seeing that. I'm by no means a vegan/vegetarian/whatever but I still find it sad to see those babies. I don't eat veal but do drink milk and am realistic enough to know it has to come from somewhere, it's still sad to me though.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm not trying to start anything either just stating thats the heathiest way to raise a large number of dairy calfs. Springer dairy heifers last week were bringing $1500 to $2500 each theres no way the producers are going to allow investments like that to die without doing what ever they can to insure good health.
                              Quality doesn\'t cost it pays.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                i think the mongolian people drank fermented horse milk?

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by MistyBlue View Post
                                  Isn't there a culture that drinks fermented mare's milk?
                                  Mare's milk sounds more palatable than when PETA was pushing Ben and Jerry's to make ice cream out of breast milk.
                                  I've never had it but I have heard that it's sweeter than cow's milk and other ruminant's milk. (goats, camels, etc)
                                  County, maybe the difference in sweetness of milk and meat on a horse is because it's not a ruminant and we're more used to drinking from/eating mammals that have a different (and better working) digestive system? I always wondered the reason myself too...being a non-ruminant is the only difference that sticks out to me.
                                  The Mongols drank it in the time of the Great Khan and continue today. See http://www.mongolfood.info/en/recipes/ayrag.html

                                  Apparantly it is produced commercially today as kumis but it generally made with cow's milk.

                                  G.
                                  Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I thought this was interesting:

                                    A 1982 source reported that 230,000 horses were kept in the USSR specifically for producing milk to make into kumis.[6]

                                    Rinchingiin Indra, writing about Mongolian dairying, says "it takes considerable skill to milk a mare" and describes the technique: the milker kneels on one knee, with a pail propped on the other, steadied by a string tied to an arm. One arm is wrapped behind the mare's rear leg and the other in front. A foal starts the milk flow and is pulled away by another person, but left touching the mare's side during the entire process.[7]

                                    In Mongolia, the milking season for horses traditionally runs between mid-June and early October. During one season, a mare produces approximately 1,000 to 1,200 kilograms of milk, of which about half is left to the foals.[8]
                                    From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kumis

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      The technique I'm aware of is slightly different from Simkie's. Someone holds the mare's head to keep her in one place, another person holds up a front leg (using a rope or strap) to keep her from getting in a good kick with a hind, and a third person does the milking.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        And if you had actually seen how they do it in the Belgian farms, you'd see that they keep foals with their mother until they are weaned and that legs are not tied up. I'd be happy to scan several articles I have here in Dutch equestrian publications about it, but they are after all written in Dutch. It is all very humane.

                                        Comment

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