• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Seeking a Critique of a Missouri Fox Trotter Mare

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Seeking a Critique of a Missouri Fox Trotter Mare

    Okay, Harriett is my up and coming mare.

    I've been working on acquiring her now since October and finally our schedules match and her vaccines are now current. Here's the original 2 posts about her. http://www.chronicleforums.com/Forum...d.php?t=187430

    She was originally to arrive this past Wednesday, but do to weather (snow & Ice) my BO wasn't chancing hauling. So, we are on for next week.

    But I wanted some input, in the original thread, it was mentioned that she may have a bit of a Cresty neck. Can you tell better by these pictures if that is true. Both my vet and the current owner's vet says they see no real issue to be concerned with.

    http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...n/DSC02073.jpg

    http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...n/DSC02091.jpg

    http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...n/DSC02075.jpg

    http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...n/DSC02089.jpg

    http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...n/DSC02090.jpg

    http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...n/DSC02094.jpg

    This is video of Harriett's current owner riding her.

    At a trott, owner can't get her to Fox Trott.
    http://s39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...t=MOV02086.flv

    Mostly at a Walk.
    http://s39.photobucket.com/albums/e1...t=MOV02084.flv

    Thanks for the help, she's supposed to be a Steady Eddy and also broke to pull a Cart, which excites me beyond her ability to trail ride.
    Chronicle of My Horse
    Secret Passage Ranch
    **a member of the
    Riders with Fibromyalgia & Adult Re-riders Clique

  • #2
    I think she's cute -- a little bit of a "chunky monkey," but not too, too chubby! Be sure and post photos of her after she's being ridden regularly and put on a diet. Congrats!
    www.JaneeneWilliams.com

    Comment


    • #3
      She does have a little enlargement at the bottom of her neck. It's hard to tell from the photos because there are none of a full side view. she has her head turned in most of them.

      I hope you will be working with a trainer that knows gaited horses. What I saw in the short clips are a grazing bit that wasn't fitted right. I don't know why it was pulled back like it was, yet the reins looked loose. ???

      A full cheek, 3-piece snaffle or a simple snaffle and take the horse back to basics. Her back needs work to bring it up. Could be cause by improper saddle fit? She was close to doing a FT in the trotting clip... she may need more support... I'm still learning how to work with my fatso... : )

      You could add some magnesium oxide to her diet if you get worried about cresty neck... 1 ounce or so.

      Comment


      • #4
        Cute fat mare.
        Well......if she was a person she would be up into the obese category.
        Nothing wrong with her that more work won't cure. Have fun!!!

        Comment


        • #5
          She looks like a MFT that's a bit chunky. No more. Anyway, If two vets have said she's okay, who cares what random non-vet internet strangers say about her?


          In the videos I see someone who can't ride on a horse that's pretty much doing what she pleases. Fix the rider part of the equation, fit the bit correctly, teach her that the bit means something and she should foxtrot fine.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by gabz View Post
            She does have a little enlargement at the bottom of her neck. It's hard to tell from the photos because there are none of a full side view. she has her head turned in most of them.

            I hope you will be working with a trainer that knows gaited horses. What I saw in the short clips are a grazing bit that wasn't fitted right. I don't know why it was pulled back like it was, yet the reins looked loose. ???

            A full cheek, 3-piece snaffle or a simple snaffle and take the horse back to basics. Her back needs work to bring it up. Could be cause by improper saddle fit? She was close to doing a FT in the trotting clip... she may need more support... I'm still learning how to work with my fatso... : )

            You could add some magnesium oxide to her diet if you get worried about cresty neck... 1 ounce or so.
            I would agree with "Gabz "to work with a gaited trainer....A fox trotter walks in the front and trots with the back feet...it doesn't seem to me that she is doing that gait correctly. JMO

            Comment


            • #7
              If your only worry is a cresty neck, I wouldn't worry about it too much. Yes, her neck is a little cresty, but she doesn't have a really lumpy cresty neck. She's a bit fat, so who knows what she'll look like on a diet + work = ) We've had a couple saddlebreds with a thyroid issue that developed cresty necks and we've had some that were just naturally cresty. Hers doesn't really look bad to me, and it's generally something that is easily manageable if something did eventually turn up.

              I think she's cute. And if you're mostly looking for a quiet horse to go on trails with and just enjoy and she fits the bill so far, then I think she'll do just fine. If your vet and her current vet see nothing to worry about, then don't = ) Also, if you wanted to take lessons with somebody that works fox trotters, then you could probably get her to fox trott if that's something you're interested in. If not, then just let her trot, haha.

              Comment


              • #8
                Of course she has a cresty neck- she's FATFATFAT!

                She needs you Good luck with her!

                Comment


                • #9
                  My question is...why are you buying her?
                  She looks like she would make a nice trail horse, and you could probably get her to do a smooth and easy sitting trot. HOWEVER, if she is not fox-trotting now, do not assume that she will in the future. It just may never happen. If you are buying her to take out with other gaited horses, she could get left in the dust and the upset of being left behind could cause her to hard trot and not fox trot.

                  So, I hope you are buying her as a nice trail horse and not as a fox trotter and not *paying* for a fox trotter. When she is pulled together its possible that she racks instead of fox trotting which could be why she is being ridden so loose. On the other hand, with the right training she could be a foxtrotter deluxe.

                  That said, we had a fox-trotter who could only do it slowly. He foxtrotter naturally in the field. He hard trotted or racked when he wanted speed. In terms of temperament he was great. Lovely boy. Very loyal and sweet. Very steady even as a 3 year old. A great trail horse and he could jump the moon. His sire tended toward the same neck as your girl if he was allowed to get heavy. A lot of MFT's are like that.
                  "The mighty oak is a nut who stood its ground"

                  "...you'll never win Olympic gold by shaking a carrot stick at a warmblood..." see u at x

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ambrey View Post
                    Of course she has a cresty neck- she's FATFATFAT!

                    She needs you Good luck with her!
                    ROFL!! Exactly what she said. Work some of that blubber off of her and she'll be fine.
                    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Crestiness having been addressed...I'll put my 2 cents in on her gait...in the video I didn't see any foxtrot but she *is* in the diagonal, that's a start! She may just not be fit enough to gait at this point. Too heavy or too thin they *can't* hold the gait with a rider, they need to have strength to foxtrot in good form. Jake was kind of *poor* when I got him, he couldn't foxtrot a lick, now he can do it forever, and like glass. He also ft's and long trots in the pasture--depends on where he's going and how fast he wants to get there.

                      I think she's worth a try and they (MFT's) make wonderful friends and trail partners! Bring her home, get her fit, and enjoy!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Good luck with her!
                        I grew up riding and showing Fox Trotters and having someone who knows how to ask for the gait helps a LOT. I showed a mare who was a model champion but could not hold a fox trot unless you REALLY knew how to keep her up in it. She preferred to pace or hard trot. That's just how she was.
                        It looks like the rider in your video isn't doing her any favors as far as asking her to gait, so I don't have an opinion either way on the video.
                        Depending on her training also, she may *not* want to go in a snaffle. My old gelding (who would have been 26 this year) was trained the "old" way in Missouri... no snaffle, he was only really happy in something with a 3 or 5 inch shank and a solid mouth. I did ride him in a Myler comfort snaffle with short shanks, but he didn't enjoy a totally broken mouthpiece, and didn't listen in a snaffle bit - needed a curb. Like, I could ride him in a halter or sidepull, bt a snaffle, he didn't really "get." And the colt I was showing about 7 years ago, when they broke him, it was straight to a curb bit.
                        Not saying they're all trained that way, but don't assume she'll go in a snaffle right off the bat (not that you were but other people have and I'm suree in the future will advise you to try a snaffle).
                        Again, good luck and enjoy her - they generally have great minds!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Expect problems with rein ads. The rider in the videos pretty much RANDOMLY hit the horse in the mouth, so expect a horse who does not expect most rein "aids" to mean ANYTHING. I suggest you train the horse on the longe to ride with voice commands, turn with your legs, and leave her mouth ALONE.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PaintedCash View Post
                            Good luck with her!Depending on her training also, she may *not* want to go in a snaffle. My old gelding (who would have been 26 this year) was trained the "old" way in Missouri... no snaffle, he was only really happy in something with a 3 or 5 inch shank and a solid mouth. Not saying they're all trained that way, but don't assume she'll go in a snaffle right off the bat (not that you were but other people have and I'm suree in the future will advise you to try a snaffle).
                            Again, good luck and enjoy her - they generally have great minds!
                            Yes - good points about the horse not going in a snaffle - I was thinking one thing but only saying part of it. There are some people that "assume" a gaited horse must go in a long-shanked curb bit... I was only trying to express that using a snaffle is okay if needed to start a horse over again. - which I didn't say at all.

                            I was just a little appalled at what I could see in the video about the equipment in use. The OP mentioned that the current owner could only get the horse to trot - which when viewing the video, I was thinking came from what was being used and how it was being used. I'm still a little perplexed about the position of the bit in the horse's mouth...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by gabz View Post
                              Yes - good points about the horse not going in a snaffle - I was thinking one thing but only saying part of it. There are some people that "assume" a gaited horse must go in a long-shanked curb bit... I was only trying to express that using a snaffle is okay if needed to start a horse over again. - which I didn't say at all.

                              I was just a little appalled at what I could see in the video about the equipment in use. The OP mentioned that the current owner could only get the horse to trot - which when viewing the video, I was thinking came from what was being used and how it was being used. I'm still a little perplexed about the position of the bit in the horse's mouth...

                              Agreed about the snaffle - I wasn't trying to say you were wrong (nor do I feel you took it that way) but just wanted to throw in what I had found in my experince- Just saying I wasn't trying to disagree with you or anything at all

                              and yeah, I kind of went when I saw the bit in the video, too!

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Thank you, all of you! I couldn't be happier with the insight you've offered me on Harriett. I am not purchasing Harriett for the fact that she's a Missouri Fox Trotter, just getting that out up front.

                                I went into this with the understanding that her current owner (rider in videos) had NEVER achieved the FT gait with Harriett. She had only gotten as far as the W/T/C with Harriett. She has also acknowledged that Harriett is 'somewhat' over weight and they have been working on reducing the amount of feed she gets, but have no increased her workouts.

                                Also, the western saddle used in the videos did not fit Harriett properly at all! I was only able to ride her a short time due to the saddle sliding off to one side and I was extremely uncomfortable with it and the bit of choice.

                                I am hoping that with a good deal of work and a proper diet (working with our vet), we'll be able to get Harriett back down to where she needs to be. While I've spoken with my BO/trainer about Harriett, I have not bothered to ask if he know's how to train a gaited horse. I'm going to assume NOT. But that is no real big deal, Harriett is supposed to be a sound (both mind and body) trail horse and that is what I'm wanting first and foremost.

                                Also, the owner before the current owner (rider in video), said Harriett was broke to cart. So, if she is, that is perfect! I've always wanted to learn to drive and if she's traffic sound, she'll be pulling a buggy by this November for a parade we walk in ever year.

                                Thank you, all I really wanted was a sound horse I could simply go to the barn, groom, spend a bit of time spoiling and working and then ride out alone or with a group and feel safe. Harriett is supposed to be that horse. And since I've spent more time with Harriett than I did with Pete (Auction house purchase), I believe her owner is telling me the truth. Time will tell.

                                As for Pete, we are struggling, but will continue to work through our issues and looking forward to enjoying our rides together.
                                Chronicle of My Horse
                                Secret Passage Ranch
                                **a member of the
                                Riders with Fibromyalgia & Adult Re-riders Clique

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  She may well surprise you by developing her fox trot on the trails, with comfortable tack and conditioning. It should come naturally to her but perhaps the discomfort and unfitness she has right now is preventing her from moving that way.

                                  The MFT I've met are very pleasant, mellow creatures. I bet you will have fun with her as a trail horse!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    VA Horse Girl - all the best to you with this mare. I got my MFT because I wanted to keep up with my friends who ride gaited and although my QH is SUPER smooth at the trot that keeps up with them, he's 22 yrs old ... so now is just as good a time as any to bring along a newer trail horse.

                                    It's so strange when a person and a horse develop a bond and then the person starts with a different horse. I'm having to constantly remind myself that the MFT (Bentley - like the car - wide and smooth) is not the QH.

                                    Here's his photo (he's very faded from summer sun): He was 200 pounds heavier than this, when I first got him!!
                                    http://s456.photobucket.com/albums/q...leyJune08B.jpg

                                    For saddle fit, I went with a Fabtron Endurance with center fire rigging. I also had to get a tacky-too contoured pad to reduce slippage. And breast collar.

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      Originally posted by gabz View Post
                                      VA Horse Girl - all the best to you with this mare. I got my MFT because I wanted to keep up with my friends who ride gaited and although my QH is SUPER smooth at the trot that keeps up with them, he's 22 yrs old ... so now is just as good a time as any to bring along a newer trail horse.

                                      It's so strange when a person and a horse develop a bond and then the person starts with a different horse. I'm having to constantly remind myself that the MFT (Bentley - like the car - wide and smooth) is not the QH.

                                      Here's his photo (he's very faded from summer sun): He was 200 pounds heavier than this, when I first got him!!
                                      http://s456.photobucket.com/albums/q...leyJune08B.jpg

                                      For saddle fit, I went with a Fabtron Endurance with center fire rigging. I also had to get a tacky-too contoured pad to reduce slippage. And breast collar.
                                      No one at my barn currently rides a gaited horse. While there are a number of TWH there, they aren't ridden by anyone except the RHs as the owners never show up.

                                      Bentley, btw I LOVE his name, is a handsome fella!

                                      I can't say I've gotten as far as a bond with my Paint/QH Pete (he's 9 btw), but we do spend quality time together and he is greeting me at the gate lately. We'll continue to work on our relationship.

                                      But if Harriett is all I believe her to be, I'll be able to get back to enjoying owning a horse. Which is what it should be and hasn't been lately.

                                      I simply want the ability to tack up and go along on the trail rides the other boarders go on without having to 'barrow' a horse from my BO, or pass because I don't have a reliable mount just yet. Not that I mind staying behind, I actually prefer riding alone, but I can't even do that with Pete at the moment for fear of being unseated and left alone. *scarey*

                                      So, I'll post pictures of Harriett (finger's crossed - she should arrive this Saturday) as soon as she gets here and I've had the chance to ride her with my BO/Trainer present and in a properly fitted saddle and bit/bridle.

                                      THANK YOU again, all of you! I'm excited beyond belief!


                                      ~Kerri, Pete, & Harriett
                                      **still very much in love with Pete
                                      Chronicle of My Horse
                                      Secret Passage Ranch
                                      **a member of the
                                      Riders with Fibromyalgia & Adult Re-riders Clique

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        That horse is OBESE. Diet needed, looks very sweet though.
                                        Boss Mare Eventing Blog
                                        https://www.youtube.com/user/jealoushe

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X