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My advice ;; stay away from metal posts!!

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  • My advice ;; stay away from metal posts!!

    It was a while back when this happened, but sharing this experience with people that use metal posts will hopefully rid of them before something like this could happen to there horse.

    My father and I "used" to pasture our horses in cedar posts with cow
    fence. With a random here and there metal post just to tighten the fence up. At the time it seemed like the best fence, everyone used it. Never heard a false remark towards that kind of fencing.

    I now regret EVER thinking that, that fence was even close to being the best fence even if it did have a ruber thing covering the sharp part of them metal posts it still couldnt have stopped this horrifying incident.

    I woke one morning to my mother hollering at me. Telling me my 7 mon. old filly was caught in the fence. My first thought was that she was fine, just being a turd like most horses ;; the grass is greener on the otherside. Well I still quickly darted outside to find that my filly was laying on top of one of them posts stabbed through her heart with her head flipped back. I was startled, I couldnt understand how in the heck she could've managed that! The only solution I came up with was that she spooked, because when you live out in the booneys of the hills of kentucky you never know what might be lurking in your backyard. It was the uptmost worst feeling I had felt ever.

    So, please anybody who has this fencing learn from my mistake and invest in a different type of fencing. You dont want to have a incident like this on your hands.
    No hour of life is spent wasted in the saddle. - Winston Churchill

  • #2
    How sad!

    This is a genuine question and it is something that has always puzzled me when I read US posts but why use a t-post (warratah here in NZ) to "tighten" up a fence - why not use wire strainers and tension your fence up that way?? Our farm is done in (NZ) standard wooden post/8-wire with battens between posts to act as a spacer/visible barrier. I have fence tighteners (little ratchet type things) on each wire on every main fence wire-run. (I've just come in from doing my routine check of fence tightness). I also have 2 hot wires in the run on my new internal fences (not allowed on the boundary fences) as well as a top out-rigger hot wire on these as well. Yes, I have had wire injuries but only one on this farm.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      We were fairly "new" to horses them days...

      We now have wood fence with a stretch of electric fence to keep them away from it, and every since has worked wonders!
      No hour of life is spent wasted in the saddle. - Winston Churchill

      Comment


      • #4
        I've wondered about those close fitting rubber toppers for t-posts....so sorry about your
        filly. Will recommend to folks who use uncovered t-posts to go for the big rounded caps.

        We have some fencing on T-posts but have the full sleeves with caps, plus the t-posts are
        recommended to be set a few inches lower than the sleeve as the sleeve settles an inch or
        two. If the cap does come off, the t-post should still be lower than the top of the sleeve.
        So far, so good.....

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm sorry for your loss. That having been said, what happened to your filly is very, very unusual. I've been using metal posts for over 30 years and never had an animal, horse or cow, injure it's self on a post.

          We use wooden posts for corner posts, and all the line posts are metal "T" posts. Several miles of fencing, and lots of animals....
          "It’s a well-documented fact that of all the animals in the realm of agriculture, Bulls have the highest job satisfaction rate."~~Ree Drummond, AKA the Pioneer Woman

          Comment


          • #6
            Sorry about your filly, as well.

            I, too, have used t-posts for years w/out any problems (knock on wood.) I do have hot wire along it though so they do keep away from the fence ragardless of what it's made of. My whole dividing pasture fence is t-posts and woven wire w/ hot along the top and the posts are all capped, perimeter and dividing.
            A Merrick N Dream Farm
            Proud Member of "Someone Special to me serves in the Military" Clique

            Comment


            • #7
              So sorry about your filly, it is sad when accidents happen.

              Our neighbor was weaning a colt in a very safe pipe pen, with a good pipe gate, had been there two months now, with other horses next to him and one morning he found him with a broken neck right outside the pen.
              The gate was bent at the top, so he assumed something scared him and the colt tried to jump it, flipped and fell wrong.
              Accidents happen so easily.

              You know, people here have had steel fence posts for hundred years or more now and in the almost 40 years I have been here we had one colt, playing with another, that fell into the fence when rearing up and right onto a steel post.
              He was lucky that the post went in in front of the elbow and didn't kill it.

              Still, from all the injured horses on fences I have heard of or seen, horses seem to be hurting themselves no matter what you use.
              The most injuries I heard of were on board fencing in the East, from hitting the fence, breaking it or flipping over it.
              I think that is because horses don't respect a wood fence, reaching over and thru it and rubbing and chewing on it.
              Unlike a barbed wire fence, where they know it bites and won't go thru one unless they fear whatever is spooking them worse.

              We have a small trap in front of the barn and pens, about 10 acres, that is barbed wire on steel post with the fat caps and hot wire on it, but the pasture after that is regular barbed wire.
              In all these years, running some 50 broodmares and many other kinds of horses behind barbed wire fencing, we had ONE three month old filly run thru a fence in a bad storm, that had a cut on her forearm, that healed fine.

              No, using barb wire on a small place or turning horses not used to it there without training them first to it is not adequated, but in the larger pastures, with the right kind of horse management, you really can use steel post and barb wire for many years without any more injuries that if those fences would have been made out of bubble wrap.

              Yes, if you are building new, use the safest fencing you can afford, that is a given, but I would not dismiss steel post where that is ok as, while not perfect, it is still adequated for many situations.
              That is not any more dangerous than stuffing a horse in a trailer and driving down the highways.
              There are some measured risks we take in our lives.
              In some places, for some, steel posts fencing is one of those.

              Comment


              • #8
                Bluey, I think the key there is the size of your turnout.....I've seen t-posts used on much smaller areas (1-2 acres|) with several horses, which might make it more risky,. Around here it's used to keep fencing costs down. This poster's story sounds like a NICE horse in my area who impaled himself in a small holding area on a t-post while in the compant of his pasturemates.
                Dee
                Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
                Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
                http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DeeThbd View Post
                  Bluey, I think the key there is the size of your turnout.....I've seen t-posts used on much smaller areas (1-2 acres|) with several horses, which might make it more risky,. Around here it's used to keep fencing costs down. This poster's story sounds like a NICE horse in my area who impaled himself in a small holding area on a t-post while in the compant of his pasturemates.
                  Dee
                  Right, you would have more injuries the more you crowd horses.

                  In our area, semi-desert, right on the desert edge, a horse needs at least, more if you go further West, 30 acres to survive in the grazing season, will still need to be supplemented in the winter, when our short native grasses are dormant.
                  That is why it takes so many acres to run any livestock here, even horses, if you don't want to destroy those fragile grasses and have a bare, dusty, windblown patch left for pastures.
                  Even one horse alone in that 10 acre trap would kill the grass there if that was the only place it had to roam.

                  Here, if you want to have more animals pastured that the land carries, you have to seed, fertilize and water, water also being a very scarce and expensive resource.
                  Most people just don't do that, only have the horses they can carry on pasture, or dry lot and feed them.

                  That is why, to fence the very large pastures this area requires for horses to graze, our horse pastures are a mile long, steel post and barbwire seems to be affordable and reasonably safe fencing for this area.

                  It is very sad when a horse gets killed, but to put these accidents in perspective will tell us where we could do better and where it is after all truly just an accident and part of the risks we take in our and our horse's lives.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm sorry that your filly's time had to come so soon. It is little consolation but it might well have happened had you used wooden posts too.
                    (Remember the fate of Wildfire in Silas Marner)

                    You can put a horse in a padded cell and they will still manage to hurt themselves.

                    I like you, think the safest fence is something visible backed up by an electric wire 3 feet inside to teach them to stay back from the visible fence.
                    A pussycat of a horse with a chewed off tail won the triple crown, The Cubs won the world series and Trump won the Presidency.
                    Don't tell me 'It can't be done.'

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      We have been using T-posts with post toppers for years and years with no bad results, but...we use them in areas that are not over-crowding our horses and I believe that is the key to better safety. I have seen some very bad injuries from just about every fencing material there is, including four board fence when a horse received a terrible puncture wound from a splintered board. Most of our own fencing is three or four board (the foal paddocks have four board).

                      I am so sorry about your filly and I can understand your fear of t-posts because of the accident. Unfortunately, you can't always blame the fence - horses and particularly young horses can get into trouble no matter what they're fenced with.
                      Susan N.

                      Don't get confused between my personality & my attitude. My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Sorry to hear of your loss.

                        We've used t-posts with and without "toppers" for more than 20 years without incident. We've used them on small paddocks and large pastures. The horses confined have sometimes been "crowded" and sometimes singletons. I guess we have tens of thousands of "equine confinement days" without every suffering a t-post induced loss.

                        During this same period I've seen horse injuries from cedar posts, treated wood posts, plastic posts, and concrete posts.

                        Anytime you confine a horse you run the risk of the horse injuring itself in an attempt to leave the confinement.

                        G.
                        Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My former vet referred to metal T-posts as "horse killers".
                          ----------------------------
                          \"You can observe a lot by watching.\" -Yogi Berra

                          http://community.webshots.com/user/cadeau_flambe

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by riveau View Post
                            My former vet referred to metal T-posts as "horse killers".
                            Our old vet used to call the smooth, not barbed wire, that here is called pony wire, "pony killer", because horses would not respect it and when they got tangled on it would keep fighting.
                            He also said that cable was even worse.

                            He always said that if you have wire and no barbs to train a horse to respect it, you needed to add electricity to it.
                            He considered the safest V mesh fences with two good size pipes so the horses could see it, one on the top, one on the middle.

                            We used such fences in our old pens and the place to tease mares and never had any injuries on those fences, even when horses crowded each other past them.

                            We do have an extra panel in each corner of the barbed wire fences by gates, where horses may crowd by and push each other as they run along playing.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It is always a good reminder to hear that fencing is not safe, so we don't have false hope, but it sounds like you did what you could to make it as safe as possible. Don't beat yourself up. RIP dear filly.


                              Some people really like the fence that horses can "bounce" off of - or break through if the forces is strong- but if that horse goes somewhere where that isn't the case, you can have tragedy as well. There is no "safe" fencing. Or "Safe" much of anything with horses.

                              The "safest" is likely wood, with an inside hotwire that NEVER fails. But, there are circumstances for everyone that make that not optimal.

                              Take care
                              "Fool! Don't you see now that I could have poisoned you a hundred times had I been able to live without you." Cleopatra VII

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I lost a horse who got paniced when another horse went after her. Instead of going thru one of the two wide open gates she went to jump or barge thru the fence and the post went into her chest and further into her lung. Pneomo thorax. If she had done this right outside an operating room it would have been hard or impossible to save her. She hung in there til the vet came and we made the decision to euthanize. She was a Belgian mare and it was awful to see her team mate mourn her. This was on a rented farm.

                                Another time many years earlier i had a horse get antsy at feed time as i was leading horses in. He jumped the stupid fence and landed on a tpost and it went into the top part of his inside of his thigh. He screamed and somehow got the strength to buck and get off it. I brought him in the barn and he almost bled to death as i was applying pressure and waiting for the vet to come and stitch. Another rented farm.

                                When i bought this place my first task was to pull down every piece of crumby farm fence and t posts and barbed wire. And i started fresh.

                                There will never be a tpost on my property and if im travelling none of my horses will ever go in an enclosure using tposts. I HATE THEM
                                from sunridge1 Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by WalkInTheWoods View Post
                                  I lost a horse who got paniced when another horse went after her. Instead of going thru one of the two wide open gates she went to jump or barge thru the fence and the post went into her chest and further into her lung. Pneomo thorax. If she had done this right outside an operating room it would have been hard or impossible to save her. She hung in there til the vet came and we made the decision to euthanize. She was a Belgian mare and it was awful to see her team mate mourn her. This was on a rented farm.

                                  Another time many years earlier i had a horse get antsy at feed time as i was leading horses in. He jumped the stupid fence and landed on a tpost and it went into the top part of his inside of his thigh. He screamed and somehow got the strength to buck and get off it. I brought him in the barn and he almost bled to death as i was applying pressure and waiting for the vet to come and stitch. Another rented farm.

                                  When i bought this place my first task was to pull down every piece of crumby farm fence and t posts and barbed wire. And i started fresh.

                                  There will never be a tpost on my property and if im travelling none of my horses will ever go in an enclosure using tposts. I HATE THEM
                                  I understand how you feel also, except I will never, ever keep horses in a wood barn, no matter how fancy and safe it seems, after being in two wood barn fires and hearing of so many others.
                                  Not that metal barns don't burn, but they don't if you manage them right, unlike wood ones.

                                  Each one of us have our own ideas of what is safe and what is risky and try to live around those ideas.

                                  If you ever were to live here, your horses would have to live in a dry lot or be behind barbed wire/steel post fencing, just as if I were to work in a barn in the East, probably that barn would be wood, much as I may think it is too dangeous.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Good point. Our life experiences help form our horsekeeping standards.
                                    from sunridge1 Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      The filly was pastured with a 7 month old stud colt. Together they got along great!

                                      The pasture was about 10 1/2 acres. I see that there is more of a risk if its smaller with more horses but regardless weather the pasture is bigger or smaller the metal posts just seem to be more lethal than any other fencing that I have checked into.
                                      No hour of life is spent wasted in the saddle. - Winston Churchill

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Walking Horse Gal View Post
                                        The filly was pastured with a 7 month old stud colt. Together they got along great!

                                        The pasture was about 10 1/2 acres. I see that there is more of a risk if its smaller with more horses but regardless weather the pasture is bigger or smaller the metal posts just seem to be more lethal than any other fencing that I have checked into.
                                        Also, young horses have a way to get injured relatively more often than older horses.
                                        The young ones are more active and careless, it seems.

                                        Comment

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