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OK...come clean Paso Fino folks...

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  • OK...come clean Paso Fino folks...

    How in God's name do you teach a horse to do this...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tJARMFTVqk&NR=1


  • #2
    Originally posted by buryinghill4 View Post
    How in God's name do you teach a horse to do this...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tJARMFTVqk&NR=1


    What do you mean... your horse doesn't do that naturally?

    My guy is NO WHERE near that fancy, but their gaits are completely natural (born with them)... they get fine tuned like those in the video with conditioning.

    I am by no means a PF know it all, we inherited ours from my MIL... I will say that I feel like I use my aids in revers when I ride him... little or no leg and hanging on his face (we use a big, super padded hackmore, and like the horses shown on the video, there is a measure of "contact" that is kept when the horse is gaiting (not even sure that is correct terminology)... just feels like I'm hanging on him compared to what I'm used to).
    \"For all those men who say, \"Why buy the cow when you can get the milk for free,\" here\'s an update for you: Nowadays 80% of women are against marriage. Why? Because women realize it\'s not worth buying an entire pig just to get a little sausage.\"-

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    • #3
      Their gaits are natural. However, there is one particular gait that a Paso Fino has that not ALL Pasos can master: the classic fino. They have two other gaits as well: the corto and largo.

      They don't "teach" their horses to gait like that. It's natural for them to be "gaited," but in order for them to look that good doing it...takes some conditioning and balance.
      If wishes were horses then beggars would ride...
      DLA: Draft Lovers Anonymous
      Originally posted by talkofthetown
      As in, the majikal butterfly-fahting gypsy vanners.

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      • #4
        I don't know how that comes about, but....

        I once worked with a lovely little Paso who had a show background. He could move just like that under saddle. If "brio" means a whole lot of effort to get nowhere, then he had it. I don't know if it was hardwired from birth or something that was forced upon him, but I do know that I didn't find it comfortable at all. Oh, he was plenty smooth alright, but the stress was palpable -- he felt like he was going to fret himself into heart failure. Zero relaxation. I hope that is not typical or correct for the breed.

        The thing was, he *only* moved this way when ridden (regardless of rider.) On the lunge, he had the most beautiful trot! Plus he was an absolute peach to handle on the ground, dead calm and the complete opposite of how he behaved under saddle.

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        • #5
          I think it looks very cool...
          Surgeon General warns: "drinking every time Trump lies during the debate could result in acute alcohol poisoning."

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          • #6
            OK, I understand the gaits like that are natural for that breed, but WHY? I mean, walk, trot, canter are all basic means of locomotion, with some of the more advanced dressage moves coming from the battlefield of long ago, so, what purpose do the Paso Fino gaits serve?

            Not trying to start an argument or anything, just very curious. Thanks. ETA, I do think it's really neat however!
            View my photographs at www.horsephotoguy.zenfolio.com

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            • #7
              Originally posted by texang73 View Post
              what purpose do the Paso Fino gaits serve?
              I believe they were developed to be mounts for South American plantation owners... they needed sturdy horses that were comfortable for all day riding, and had the ability to travel faster while expending less energy than traditional gaits do.

              There are several gaited breeds, each moving differently than the next... It is just a characteristic that some horses have (there have been naturally gaited Arabians!)... breed enough generations of them it becomes dominant and voila a breed.
              \"For all those men who say, \"Why buy the cow when you can get the milk for free,\" here\'s an update for you: Nowadays 80% of women are against marriage. Why? Because women realize it\'s not worth buying an entire pig just to get a little sausage.\"-

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by texang73 View Post
                OK, I understand the gaits like that are natural for that breed, but WHY? I mean, walk, trot, canter are all basic means of locomotion, with some of the more advanced dressage moves coming from the battlefield of long ago, so, what purpose do the Paso Fino gaits serve?

                Not trying to start an argument or anything, just very curious. Thanks. ETA, I do think it's really neat however!
                Some Paso's can't move any other way, so in that case, it serves to get them somewhere. XD

                There's a little mare here on the property (all the horses but one are Fino's) that is very very hot and will fino in hand right next to me when she reaaaaallly wants to explode but knows she should behave.

                A few of the horses on the property will trot, but for the most part, they gait.

                The stallion for instance, I've never once seen trot in the 6 months I've been here.
                Do no harm but take no s***
                Owned by Good Lil Train since 2014

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                • #9
                  A very small percentage of Paso Finos are capable of correctly performing the paso fino ("fine walk") as seen in the video. It's judged on clarity of rhythm as well as speed of footfall, which is why the horses move along the sounding board. Those who can't fino perform at the corto (about the same speed as a working trot, but a broken lateral 4 beat gait) and the largo (also broken lateral, but more extended and faster than the corto).

                  The gait is natural, the refinement comes from practice and conditioning for strength and balance.

                  Why? Well, why the slow gait, the rack, the tolt, the flying pace, the running walk, the foxtrot, etc.? Because the horses can, and it's fun! Although as in every other horse sport there are some bad apple trainers, most Pasos are carefully brought along to perform in the aspect of the discipline they are most suited for (bella forma, performance, fino, etc.) or simply to be good trail and working horses.
                  Patience pays.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Silence View Post
                    Some Paso's can't move any other way, so in that case, it serves to get them somewhere. XD

                    There's a little mare here on the property (all the horses but one are Fino's) that is very very hot and will fino in hand right next to me when she reaaaaallly wants to explode but knows she should behave.

                    A few of the horses on the property will trot, but for the most part, they gait.

                    The stallion for instance, I've never once seen trot in the 6 months I've been here.


                    I have never, ever seen Tiempo trot.

                    His canter is dreeeeaaamy though
                    I recognized with despair that I was about to be compelled to buy a horse ~
                    Edith Somerville and "Martin Ross"

                    "Momma" to Tiempo, Tucker and Puff, RIP my beautiful Norman 8/2012

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                    • #11
                      That's really cool. I've never seen that gait before. I noticed all the horses had the same style tail carriage. Is that natural as well?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by joiedevie99 View Post
                        That's really cool. I've never seen that gait before. I noticed all the horses had the same style tail carriage. Is that natural as well?
                        sometimes yes, sometimes no

                        http://www.americanpasofinos.com/view_article.php?id=34

                        Don't know much about Paso's, so I don't know how common it is. I would guess the more extremely hooked tails are man made and the less dramatic looking hooked tails are natural?

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                        • #13
                          The gait of the Paso Fino horse is totally natural and normally exhibited from birth. It is an evenly-spaced four-beat lateral gait with each foot contacting the ground independently in a regular sequence at precise intervals creating a rapid, unbroken rhythm. Executed perfectly, the four hoof beats are absolutely even in both cadence and impact. Footfall is in the same sequence as a natural equine walk, i.e., left rear, left fore, right rear, right fore. Propulsion is primarily from the hind limbs and the horse's motion is absorbed in its back and loins, resulting in unequaled smoothness and comfort for the rider. The Paso Fino gait is performed at three forward speeds of the gait with varying degrees of collection. IN all speeds of the gait, the rider should appear virtually motionless in the saddle, and there should be no perceptible up and down motion of the horse's croup.
                          -- http://www.pasofinos.info/standards.htm

                          http://www.yeawedo.com/pasofinohistory.htm

                          The J-tails are completely natural and are desired but not required.

                          Its a ton of fun and everyone should ride one of these guys at some point. I don't have fino horses, mine would be shown in country pleasure if I wasn't too busy running games with one of them.
                          Last edited by Brio; Dec. 30, 2008, 11:23 PM.
                          ---------------------------
                          University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine Class of 2012
                          Member of the Asthmatic Riders & "Someone Special To Me Serves In The Military" cliques

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                          • #14
                            I dont have a Paso, but for what its worth-- my racking mare once broke into what amounted to a "fino rack" --her legs were moving very rapidly and the rhythm was the distinct four-beat rack, but we were going nowhere fast. She was very alert but not quite spooking and has only done this the one time. I've seen other gaited horses rack in place and it's been about like a piaffe, if that makes sense. One time this happened on a steep trail with many horses and rocks going everywhere--the horse wanted to GO and his rider was not letting him start a rockslide by charging down the hill, so the horse tried to start the rockslide right where he was...

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by buryinghill4 View Post
                              How in God's name do you teach a horse to do this...

                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tJARMFTVqk&NR=1

                              sit down in your seat,collect the forward and let up on the clutch ever so slowly

                              it's a wonderful thing to ride...

                              best
                              Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
                              I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.

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                              • #16
                                I'm pretty sure the tails are a natural thing. Part of the breed specs.

                                My dad had a couple Peruvian Pasos (almost the same as Paso Finos) for a few years, and one had a foal. The baby came out with those gaits. The 3 of them sounded like a herd of 20 going across the pasture.

                                They are a wonderfully comfortable ride, and if I ever have back trouble I'd consider getting one, but to be honest, I got bored with them pretty quick. That's all they do. Yes, they can trot and canter too if you want them to, but essentially they only have one trick. (I know people do lots of different things with them, don't think that I'm saying that's all they are able to do. JMO.) Now, if all I wanted to do was trail ride and drink on horseback, they're the ones to have!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Tamara in TN View Post
                                  sit down in your seat,collect the forward and let up on the clutch ever so slowly

                                  it's a wonderful thing to ride...

                                  best
                                  LOL, that is great! I love my paso fino stallion, granted her is a Pleasure Stallion, but he is the nicest, smoothest horse. So well mannered, easy to work with, no one knows he's a stallion! I look at him and then my other jumping horses and know in my heart they don't have 1/2 the athleticism that he has. His name is Wintapi Movado, he's on my website.
                                  Maria Hayes-Frosty Oak Stables
                                  Home to All Eyez On Me, 1998 16.2 Cleveland Bay Sporthorse Stallion
                                  & FrostyOak Hampton 2008 Pure Cleveland Bay Colt
                                  www.frostyoaks.com

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Our best friends have 'pleasure' pasos, not up to that level of exhibition but way less explosive. While as someone here said its kind of a one trick pony, it is VERY useful - at least for them.

                                    They have taken these horses in parades (including the Circus Parade in Milwaukee and the Puerto Rican Day Parade in NYC)

                                    Exhibitions including historical, trails advocates, sidesaddle, even protests against closing the Department of Agriculture and the State Parks in the last year - one exhibition was at Liberty State Park directly across from (at the time) the World Trade Center with helicopters landing, a speed boat race on the river etc.

                                    The ride on any trail - pretty much anywhere and yes they do canter and jump a bit when needed. From having ridden with them they certainly can get somewhere when needed. Many trotting horse riders are hard pressed to keep up with them for the length they'll gait along on the trail

                                    Not to forget doing charity train robberies in various settings, some of them rather urban.

                                    For them, you couldn't have a better riding companion. One is more mellow, but the others they've had all 'don't stop, they hover', but they aren't tense, just 'ready to go'

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by aspenlucas View Post
                                      So well mannered, easy to work with, no one knows he's a stallion! I look at him and then my other jumping horses and know in my heart they don't have 1/2 the athleticism that he has. His name is Wintapi Movado, he's on my website.
                                      you have described most of the Iberian's I have met how is yours bred? I have not seen a grey PF in a while...but caveat,I have not looked closely...


                                      best
                                      Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
                                      I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Sakura View Post
                                        I believe they were developed to be mounts for South American plantation owners... they needed sturdy horses that were comfortable for all day riding, and had the ability to travel faster while expending less energy than traditional gaits do.
                                        That's what I always thought too, and I also heard that another benifit- purpse of these quick but smooth gait was less "damage" to the ground- where as a trot or canter would tear it up (thus the divots on polo fields).

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