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Where are all the "all rounder" horses?

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  • #21
    You may also want to look at Connemaras and Conn/TB crosses, since they are often smaller horses used for low level eventing. Try the American Connemara website at acps.org. Not a big classified section, but some real gems come up occasionally.

    Good luck!
    ...somewhere between the talent and the potato....

    Comment


    • #22
      I've had 2 like that so far, one was 500 bucks and the other 600 bucks, neither one is a registered anything, unless you count the blm as a registered breed
      my dear departed yellowhorse did trails, eventing, dressage, hunters, eq, endurance, western pleasure etc
      the 500 buck one took alot of work, this one i got a few months ago came that way, small tough little thing, can't do anything well but does it all, she was a kids pony so had some bad habits that are mostly ground manners issues
      sometimes they aren't promoted as all round horses and sometimes they ahven't done it all yet but if they have the right attitude its not hard to go from a good western horse to a good english horse, i think both were so cheap because they are too little for adults and too big for kids, not registered and had no show record, they were in backyards
      one of the ncest horses i've met was a little gelding from a backyard who turned out to do nicely with his ammie owner in the hunter ring, he was being sold as a western pleasure horse but could jump and go around a course, who knew?

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Sakura View Post
        Saw a post on another forum a day or so a go... gal has been trying to sell her 7 year old 14.3 hh Half Arab mare for about a year now, horse has been shown in hand, broke to ride (has been out on the trails), yet still green, should be a good all rounder... has her listed on several sites... no bites whatsoever She has dropped the price several times (well below the range you mentioned...)... So, they are out there, but you may have to look to "off" breed types...
        These horses are hard to sell. The PROVEN all-rounder is quite a bit different than the PROSPECT all-rounder, because of the amount of training put in.

        A horse who has shown hunters, jumpers, and dressage and is equally happy doing any one of the three is a gem. A horse that COULD do all of those is a big sinkhole for time and $$.

        Comment


        • #24
          Have you put a wanted ad out?
          Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

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          • #25
            Welcome to the club. I live in the GTA and have been looking for a decent, affordable all-rounder since August and haven't found anything that fits my needs yet. The numbers of sales postings has really declined in the last few months, so maybe folks like us will have to wait until the spring when more people start selling again.

            If you have enough time to go on a roadtrip, keep an eye on classifieds for close states like Michigan. I've seen several really good deals down there even when factoring in shipping costs. Unfortunately, I work 7 mornings a week so can't take a shopping trip down there right now. If you have the time, though, you should check it out.

            You could also try posting a wanted ad on EMG; I got tons of responses, though none of them were quite what I was looking for.

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by SquishTheBunny View Post
              So I was searching on equine.com for a horse.... (no need to PM me, we were just trying to get ideas on horses for the spring).

              I was looking for a horse under 15 years old.
              Broke...suitable low level everything (schooling show hunter, dressage, trail riding). Pretty much a glorified schoolie, but doesnt need to be THAT broke.
              14hh - 16.2hh.
              Any breed...yep, any.
              Under 7,000

              My search came up with ZERO in our province. Are people really not selling horses anymore, or are these "good all-rounders" just mythical creatures? Is 7k too little for one of these creatures?
              I know this type very well because I've spent much of my life pursuing horses like these!

              I think what you are looking for CAN be had for under 7k, but you'll have to compromise a little, somehow. You're not going to find bang-up movement, impeccable training, totally sane, sound, etc. for under 10k.

              One place you can find all-around types like these is at summer camps that run decent equestrian programs. They won't be extravagant movers, and they won't be fancy. Most will max out at 2'6, and they may have a few quirks from doing lots of lessons... but they are usually really sane, hack out, trail ride, do a little dressage, a little jumping. Over the years I've found plenty of kind, usable mounts at a local riding camp that are suitable for a little bit of everything, and do respectably on the local circuit.

              PS-- as far as compromising, I'm with those that say to compromise on the "blingy" stuff like movement, size, chrome, etc. Take the homely horse with the good brain over the pretty one with an empty head....
              We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.

              Comment


              • #27
                Morgans!

                Originally posted by Teatime View Post
                I echo the other Morgan posts. I have two in my barn and have been a Morgan rider and fan since the early 70s. The traditionally bred Morgan can do anything - with a great attitude. They can pull a sleigh, jump a hunter course, show in the dressage ring and trail ride with the best of them. There still are plenty of farms out there who have not been sucked into the Saddlebred knock-off.
                Morgans were bred TO BE the all-around horse.

                I went from a Morgan mare, to a Thoroughbred when she was retired, and now, back to a Morgan gelding. "Blue" has been trained western, supposedly drives, and I ride him English and also bareback on the trails. I have jumped him, would like to do some low level dressage (as part of eventing), and if I get a trailer, maybe some team penning north of here, too.

                Blue is an old-fashioned Morgan. Although he is exactly opposite of what I wanted in bloodlines---he is Government/Western Working, and I was looking for Brunk/Lippitt, he is what I was looking for---an all-around, FUN horse. He is barely more than 15.0 hands, but he rides BIGGER. In the pasture, he can look like a dumpy guy. There are times, however, when I lead him, he strides out and lifts his head, watching something, he absolutely takes my breath away.

                Although (show) Morgans can be pricey (and I wouldn't recommend them as "all around horses"), there are some great, old-fashioned/foundation Morgans that can be bought for a very reasonable amount. Mine was free.
                "Oh, sure, you may be able to take down one smurf, but mark my words: You bonk one smurf, you better be ready for a blue wave."---Bucky Katt

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by Ambrey View Post
                  These horses are hard to sell. The PROVEN all-rounder is quite a bit different than the PROSPECT all-rounder, because of the amount of training put in.

                  A horse who has shown hunters, jumpers, and dressage and is equally happy doing any one of the three is a gem. A horse that COULD do all of those is a big sinkhole for time and $$.
                  And yet there has been at least two posts in this tread where people have stated that they have bought prospects and made them into thew allrounders that they wanted... If the mind is there it is worth the effort. Besides the OP said
                  but doesnt need to be THAT broke.
                  .
                  \"For all those men who say, \"Why buy the cow when you can get the milk for free,\" here\'s an update for you: Nowadays 80% of women are against marriage. Why? Because women realize it\'s not worth buying an entire pig just to get a little sausage.\"-

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                  • #29
                    There are plenty of show morgans out there in your price range. They're just not the OKC morgans. They are maybe less competitive and show on the local circuit or maybe a few "A"s a year. A friend just had a all arounder like you speak of for sale before taking him off the market because nobody wanted to pay 6500 for him. He HAS qualified for OKC as an equitation horse, moves spectacularly. He was line driven, but not hitched. I don't know he'd hold up to jumping, but anything on the flat would be fine. My friend refused to take him to dressage shows even though I begger her to go with me. Her daughter would play around with him and he'd do 1 tempi's in beautiful form in a western pleasure bit and romel reins. *sigh* He's off the market now as far as I know and relocated south in a week. Funny how the horse sales/buying works. LOL.
                    "You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars;
                    you have a right to be here." ~ Desiderata by Max Ehrmann

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by Sakura View Post
                      And yet there has been at least two posts in this tread where people have stated that they have bought prospects and made them into thew allrounders that they wanted... If the mind is there it is worth the effort.
                      Oh, absolutely- most of us horse buyers just don't have the skill, and would have to hire one of those other posters to do the work

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        I have a Morgan/Arab/QH cross who is my allarounder. Topping out at 2 6-2 9, can make the lines if you push (14 3),she's my XC prospect...basic dressage, roped off of her, team penned, trail goddess, great babysitter horse for kids/hubby but can passage when you hit the right buttons...forward forward forward....conformational mr. potatohead and still has good form over fences...but seriously...worth her weight in gold. If I EVER needed to sell her, I wouldn't have to list her. I can think of at least 5 off the top of my head.

                        Those that are truly "proven" have quite a good market and get snatched up fast. I think you can find what you're looking for, but you might have to try more word of mouth options because a truly proven one is a pretty hot commodity even in this market.

                        Now a PROSPECT? Well shoot. I think almost any horse can do it if their mind is right and someone is willing to put a lot of wet saddle blankets into the mix.

                        We found one last year who was in bad shape...feet bad, emaciated, had some basic buttons...2k. Turned out to be a good trail horse too...OTTB. 12 YO.

                        Took us a year to find "the one".
                        A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

                        Might be a reason, never an excuse...

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                        • #32
                          Originally posted by Ambrey View Post
                          Oh, absolutely- most of us horse buyers just don't have the skill, and would have to hire one of those other posters to do the work
                          What are you talking about? If you can buy a green horse with a good mind and athletic ability chances are they may just turn into a good allrounder. If you are capable of training said animal your self, great. If it can be done under the guidance of your trainer, great.
                          \"For all those men who say, \"Why buy the cow when you can get the milk for free,\" here\'s an update for you: Nowadays 80% of women are against marriage. Why? Because women realize it\'s not worth buying an entire pig just to get a little sausage.\"-

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            Well,my OTTB fits all your criteria (except 16.3h), but YOU CAN'T HAVE HER! A little over a year ago, I bought her for $3000, wit no experience in any particular area. Not sure what she's worth now, but I just really started training in June and since then she's done eventing and dressage shows, and we're about to foxhunt and do some jumper shows. She a scopey jumper, trail rides, totes around hubby and multiple little kids at once, and she's been known to go western. And she attracts fans like a boy band, because she is GORGEOUS and a pretty mover. So unless finances force it, she is staying with me for good (and if finances did force it, the line has already begun forming).

                            Find the right personality in an inexperienced, inexpensive horse, and it can become a steady all-arounder pretty quick. But once you have them going, you don't want to sell! You have to fight off offers!

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              If you are really willing to consider any breed, I know lots of Bashkir Curly owners and breeders in Ontario. I have met very few horses more versatile. My gelding goes from shows to parades to trails to demos in front of thousands of people without skipping a beat. He's won champion at a dressage show in the same month as winning a high point western pleasure championship. He takes care of this timid rider without funny business and with a change of tack can amp it up and gallop a cross country course with the eventer I have ride him sometimes. I say all this not to brag about him- but about the breed. Most of the well bred, well put together Bashkir Curlies have this kind of mind and athletic ability. Because we aren't a purpose-bred breed, finding the all-rounders is so much easier- and 7k would be able to land you a nice steady mare or gelding with trail and show miles.
                              my horse trailer was stolen from kentucky horse park. Seen it?

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                I have one. He packs kids, too - and isn't for sale (nor will he ever be). I bought him for $1000 off the track, and made him myself.

                                Funny thing is, when I advertised him for lease, I got VERY little interest. I actually wondered if advertising all he could do was turning people off, because they assumed I was exaggerating - if not outright lying. I'd try calling about horses that maybe don't LIST that they can do everything, but look like the type who COULD. Don't look for a breed (not that you said you were) - breed has almost nothing to do with versatility; it's horses with good brains and trainers who are themselves versatile that make the difference, and you find those in pretty much every breed.
                                Proud member of the EDRF

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                                • #36
                                  I second the Spanish Mustang comments. While my boy isn't known to be a Spanish Mustang for sure, we've had lots of opinions that indicate he must have some Spanish mustang blood in him based on his conformation, etc. He's the epitome of all rounder - he's ribbons in Hunter classes, loves to jump even though he's half blind, has brilliant movements in dressage, loves trail rides and will go for miles, likes to chase cows in team penning, has allowed me to play various renaissance games such as mounted combat and jousting, etc. Oh, and he was free and is only two years under saddle. The only thing he's probably NOT good for is western pleasure as we don't have a lope... YET. He has a jog though, so some day I'm sure I'll be able to get a nice lope out of him.
                                  If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude.
                                  ~ Maya Angelou

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    You might have some luck looking for one just shy of being an all-rounder, and add a little training. I had a friend who sold a solidly western broke horse to a lady who subsequently finished her jump training and did some foxhunting. A $4000 western horse turned out to be a lovely field hunter/all-around type for her, with minimal work.

                                    I would start with a western horse, but that's just my personal preference. Around here there are several good western trainers who will produce a horse that can stand, tie, has been around cattle/equipment, trail ridden etc. Many of the "english discipline" trainers around here are more show oriented and often don't take as much time with the tying, ground manners, trail work, etc. That may vary in your neck of the woods.

                                    In my experience (which is admittedly less than many on this board), there are plenty of trail horses who can go nicely in the ring, but LOADS of horses who work in the ring and come unglued on a trail. I'd seek out the former at a bit under your price, maybe $5k (which should get you a very, very nice trail horse), and do $2K worth of training to get where you want to be with the rest.

                                    It also never hurts to approach someone at a show if they have a horse that looks like what you're looking for. Many times they are a much-treasured horse who is not for sale for any amount, but sometimes there's a kid going to college or a divorce in the works and you may get lucky, espeically if you're willing to do a lease.

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Originally posted by meaty ogre View Post
                                      I would start with a western horse, but that's just my personal preference. Around here there are several good western trainers who will produce a horse that can stand, tie, has been around cattle/equipment, trail ridden etc. Many of the "english discipline" trainers around here are more show oriented and often don't take as much time with the tying, ground manners, trail work, etc. That may vary in your neck of the woods.

                                      In my experience (which is admittedly less than many on this board), there are plenty of trail horses who can go nicely in the ring, but LOADS of horses who work in the ring and come unglued on a trail. I'd seek out the former at a bit under your price, maybe $5k (which should get you a very, very nice trail horse), and do $2K worth of training to get where you want to be with the rest.
                                      Very much agree! Well broke western horses can be turned into really versatile mounts with a little bit of work.
                                      We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        We have one! But he's definately not for sale. He's done everything from reining to eventing to showmanship to packing around beginners. Maybe you can't find any because nobody really wants to give them up. Or your price range is too low for a been there done that kind of horse. Try raising your price and see what you get.

                                        Here's some I thought looked like what you were looking for:
                                        http://horsetopia.horse-for-sale.org...fieds/ad350892
                                        http://horsetopia.horse-for-sale.org...fieds/ad355746
                                        http://horsetopia.horse-for-sale.org...fieds/ad330549 - personal favourite.
                                        Last edited by victoriAH!; Dec. 30, 2008, 06:04 PM. Reason: added examples :)
                                        Three phases; two hearts; ONE passion ♥ EVENTING.

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Look around WNY. I know of a couple that would fit your description. (: I got my QH as a 4-year-old; his registration papers were lost (I actually believe that, because he looks like he was worth registering at some point), he came through auction and was bought by a dealer. He is sound, sane, smart, pretty darn cute, and does trail riding, trail classes, hunt seat, cows, and medieval horsemanship. Haven't started him jumping yet really, but the one or two little fences I've hopped him over he took in stride and I think he'll be a pretty capable little hunter. So we got 'em cheap around here and we're only 2 hours away from you! (:
                                          "Remain relentlessly cheerful."

                                          Graphite/Pastel Portraits

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