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Question for those who keep horses at home

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Mtn trails View Post
    That's the thing, the time. By the time I get home from work, do barn chores, hook up the trailer, load the little twit, tack, ride and get home, you're talking a couple hours. There is an arena very close by, less than a mile away that I could haul to a few times a week. The turning out for the winter sounds good but I really need to keep her in work; she's really starting to 'get it' and I don't want to quit when she's at this turning point.
    I certainly relate to the frustration of trailering out. But it does sound like your best option.
    In the summer when I ship out I make sure I have stalls done and everything set up for pm chores in the morning before work so when I come back I can just bring horses in, feed grain and be done.
    I race home from work, load and go. The arena I ship to is about 7 minutes away. I will admit to speed grooming and tacking quickly. I ride 2 horses which takes me about 3 hours total door to door so to speak. I schedule myself with quicker rides on week nights, and spend more time on weekends. Horses get a better grooming session then as well.
    Shipping out is doable, and if you are only doing it say one weekday and both weekend days it shouldn't be too bad.
    For me I try not to look at how difficult it is and what a PIA it is, but just do it. It's like going to the gym. Once you get in the routine it is easy to keep momentum.
    The difficulty is worth it in many little ways. My horses are all excellent loaders and shippers, I can hook up my trailer in one try....little things like that.
    "Half the failures in life result from pulling in one's horse when it is leaping."

    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?ai...7&l=eca0d15457

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    • #22
      Is the footing in the area you have at home too unlevel to ride on? Even simple flatwork stuff? Perhaps packing down the snow with a snowmobile or snowblowing a section to work in?

      We have a ring here at my BO's small private farm but the footing is a little too deep for my liking so I don't use it that often. If we have to work at home we either do lots of transition work and shoulder in/haunches in, leg yield etc... on a 1/10th of a mile gravel straightaway OR we have a gently sloping grass paddock that is great for working on figure 8's, serpentines and transitions as well. Fortunately the footing is fairly decent regardless of weather and stays like that since no horses are turned out there.
      Neither of the places leave alot of room for long canter or gallop work but I can make do. I have 700 acres of trails and a nice hillwork field across the street but during hunting season I try to stay off except for Sunday so I have to get creative sometimes.

      We usually end up trucking out once a week to an indoor in the winter for either a lesson or schooling. I have a local horsey rec area with a nice big grass ring to work in too but I have to truck to that. If the ground is too hard to do any real work outside in winter I truck out more often. It sucks but it still ends up being cheaper than boarding at an indoor with comparable care and turnout situation. Now that winter is really setting in I already talked to the closest BO with an indoor and we worked out a "package" deal for trucking in. Is that a possibility? I'm fortunate in the fact I can leave my truck hooked up to my trailer since it is an extra vehicle so trucking out is really no biggie for me. I'll tack up my guy at home, throw a cooler on and truck 5 minutes down the road to the indoor.

      When the weather is really bad like right after a snow storm we ride here.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by LookinSouth View Post
        . . . . .I already talked to the closest BO with an indoor and we worked out a "package" deal for trucking in. Is that a possibility? I'm fortunate in the fact I can leave my truck hooked up to my trailer since it is an extra vehicle so trucking out is really no biggie for me. I'll tack up my guy at home, throw a cooler on and truck 5 minutes down the road to the indoor.

        When the weather is really bad like right after a snow storm we ride here.
        Years ago I was the master of guerilla schooling but it sucked, it either took a long time or was dangerous to ride to a public arena or both, or I trespassed like crazy on land with questionable footing at best, and lots of other users - model rocket shooting anyone?. I have a trailer and a dedicated tow vehicle now, the above sounds like a wonderful idea. Lots of Western horses and foxhunters tow tacked up with no problems.
        Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
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        • #24
          Originally posted by ReSomething View Post
          . Lots of Western horses and foxhunters tow tacked up with no problems.

          yep I didn't start hauling tacked until I started hunting. I will only do it in certain trailers with very specific hauling buddies but my own horse hauls seamlessly so I haul tacked fairly often since he has the trailer to himself and most of our destinations are less than 20 minutes away. I even haul tacked to my lessons now too.

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          • Original Poster

            #25
            That would be ideal hauling tacked but my two horse has the upright bar in the center that the butt bars and divider attaches to and I'd be afraid I'd get a stirrup caught or some other similar calamity. I guess that's going to be my simplest solution since our pastures are too uneven for my liking plus they'll be a soggy mess once the snow leaves. I wish I had a smaller car or something to drive to work so I could leave my truck attached to the trailer. It would make life so much easier. Thanks everyone.
            Yogurt - If you're so cultured, how come I never see you at the opera? Steven Colbert

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            • #26
              Originally posted by Mtn trails View Post
              That would be ideal hauling tacked but my two horse has the upright bar in the center that the butt bars and divider attaches to and I'd be afraid I'd get a stirrup caught or some other similar calamity. I guess that's going to be my simplest solution since our pastures are too uneven for my liking plus they'll be a soggy mess once the snow leaves. I wish I had a smaller car or something to drive to work so I could leave my truck attached to the trailer. It would make life so much easier. Thanks everyone.

              hmmm... my 2 horse just has a regular divider but in order to prevent stirrups getting caught I put up my stirrups very securely by wrapping the leather around the stirrup bar, place my saddle cover over the saddle and then put a cooler or sheet over the covered saddle. I have found using this method that my saddle has never been rubbed, scratched etc... and I feel pretty confident that the stirrups wouldn't get caught on anything.

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              • #27
                I board at very small private place with no arena. Luckily, there is a nice flat grass area to school in, so that works unless it is really muddy or icy. I do try to ship out for a lesson in a ring when I can.

                Are there neighbors with riding rings, or flat areas? If there are, you could work out a deal to use their facilities.

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                • #28
                  I think I understand that people haul with the horse tacked to save time when they get to the destination, but since it takes the same amount of time to tack up wherever you do it, what's the actual advantage?....or am I missing something? When I had a trailer and hauled everytime I rode the tack lived in the trailer anyway.

                  Just dont like the thought of tack complicating things if there was a wreck.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by jeano View Post
                    I think I understand that people haul with the horse tacked to save time when they get to the destination, but since it takes the same amount of time to tack up wherever you do it, what's the actual advantage?....or am I missing something? When I had a trailer and hauled everytime I rode the tack lived in the trailer anyway.

                    Just dont like the thought of tack complicating things if there was a wreck.
                    Fox hunting, we used to saddle at home and if the stirrups are run up, they should not get hung on anything.
                    Some bigger horses we may wait to saddle at the meet, but then we had to get there earlier to take the time for that, as many of our horses were young OTTB's and became a little excited once there.
                    They would not always stand as well in the middle of all that going on, which made for some interesting times, until they learned some manners.

                    When working cattle, we saddle at home and haul saddled, horses tied to the left and riding like sardines in a can there, without trouble ever.

                    We get to one pasture, unload, tighten the cinch, get on, check cattle, may have to rope one and treat it or load it, loosen the cinch, load the horses back and go to the next pasture, etc. until we have checked them all, when we get home and unload and unsaddle.

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                    • #30
                      OK, THAT makes sense, since you would have commotion going on at the hunt fixture and perhaps since a lot of English-trained horses arent trained to stand quietly or tie to a trailer, or so I've heard, ditto when you are hauling from place to place to work cattle as opposed to being done for the day after one unloading...

                      It hasnt made much sense to me when I've seen people hauling tacked up to a trailhead--certainly most horses seemed to be heading home un-tacked...

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                      • #31
                        Sometimes at trailheads or other locations, the parking is tight and there's not always a good place to tie the horses to tack them up. Additionally, if you can't park the rig near the tack room, you're carrying a heavy (in the case of western) saddle to the trailer and in and out of the tack space.

                        So, if you have a good place inside to tack up the horse, then the horse is carrying the saddle to the trailer. : ) And... the cattle work and hunt, etc.

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                        • #32
                          Originally posted by Mtn trails View Post
                          What if, you have your horses at home but don't have an arena or anyplace in your immediate area to ride? How do you school or keep your horse in shape? I'm facing that dilemma right now because I will have to bring my TB home as I can't afford to board her where I have a big indoor to use. What do all of you do? Haul out several times a week? The only place I have is in the pasture and too unlevel to do any serious work. Not to mention the weather doesn't cooperate (2' of snow on the ground). I need some ideas.
                          i have my horses and ponies in my own small holding
                          i dont have an arena or school or walls - i ride out hack out and if i orde in then i ride in
                          no biggy not having a arena to ride in
                          i hack out and school outside down quiet lanes and roads and in the woods
                          if in then i use the middle field which is all open and put jumps up or school
                          or i might go up the top yard and use the indoor school whatever takes me fancy i will do but more often or not i school outside on the roads and in the woods as then the horse see things in life and i also show compete all of them

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                          • #33
                            Originally posted by gabz View Post
                            Sometimes at trailheads or other locations, the parking is tight and there's not always a good place to tie the horses to tack them up. Additionally, if you can't park the rig near the tack room, you're carrying a heavy (in the case of western) saddle to the trailer and in and out of the tack space.

                            So, if you have a good place inside to tack up the horse, then the horse is carrying the saddle to the trailer. : ) And... the cattle work and hunt, etc.
                            Exactly.

                            With my old trailer I had a tack storage area so I never hauled tack. My tack storage area WAS my tack room which made it a little easier. I also wasn't hauling out to as many different places at the time, mostly my old trainers barn and hunter paces, shows etc...
                            However, I now have a 2h straightload with no dressing room or tack storage so whenever I haul tack I have to put in the front seat of the truck. If I have a passenger with me it makes for very cramped space.

                            In addition, if I haul out to an indoor I often I have to walk quite a bit to the cross ties/tack up area from where I park my trailer. I then have to move my tack from my tack room at home, into my truck, from truck to tack up area at indoor, onto horse, off horse, into truck, into my home tack room. So needless to say for my particular circumstance it adds ALOT of time. If I haul tacked I tack my horse up at right next to my tack room, put a saddle cover/cooler on horse, load on trailer, park at indoor and we can get right to work. When we are done I do untack and then have to carry everything over to the truck. When I am at the trainers barn I usually have help carrying my stuff back to the trailer but if I dont' I have to make 2 trips. All of this takes time and during the week I rarely have time to spare with a hungry husband waiting patiently for dinner at home.

                            The bottom line is if you personally dont' feel comfortable hauling tacked don't do it. It's really not a big deal.

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                            • #34
                              Originally posted by Mtn trails View Post
                              I wish I had a smaller car or something to drive to work so I could leave my truck attached to the trailer. It would make life so much easier. Thanks everyone.
                              There are some gadgets on the market to make hitching faster. There's no such thing as a fast hitch-up unless you own a Brenderup (I can hitch that bad boy in 2 minutes flat, and that's if I'm taking my time), but if you're hitching up 3+ times a week, a set of Hitchin' Rods would pay for themselves in saved time and hassle:
                              http://www.qwks.com/Hitchin-Rods-p-2.html
                              Head Geek at The Saddle Geek Blog http://www.thesaddlegeek.com/

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