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Horse Shock Collar

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  • Horse Shock Collar

    My fiance has been joking about this for a while now, but I was hoping no one would come up with it. I was just flipping through my valley vet catalog and saw a horse shock collar. I understand them for dogs, but horses? I just don't see it. What do Cothers think?

  • #2
    They have been around for ages. One is called The Vice Breaker. We did try it on cribbers. Worked just fine as long as you wanted to stay outside hiding forever. And 2 out of 3 got really bad impaction colics.

    Then Someone sent us an automatic anti-cribbing shock color to test. Horse still cribbed, but when he saw me he raised his head and arched his neck and ZZzzzAAAP! The Zap caused him to run around in a very collected frame which kept zapping him. I couldn't get near the horse for 2 months until the battery wore down.

    The inventor has tested in on QH who just learned to keep their heads down. TB? Not so much

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    • #3
      Originally posted by equinelaw View Post
      They have been around for ages. One is called The Vice Breaker. We did try it on cribbers. Worked just fine as long as you wanted to stay outside hiding forever. And 2 out of 3 got really bad impaction colics.

      Then Someone sent us an automatic anti-cribbing shock color to test. Horse still cribbed, but when he saw me he raised his head and arched his neck and ZZzzzAAAP! The Zap caused him to run around in a very collected frame which kept zapping him. I couldn't get near the horse for 2 months until the battery wore down.

      The inventor has tested in on QH who just learned to keep their heads down. TB? Not so much
      Wow, those are some damned serious unintended consequences -- stressing out the horses so badly meanwhile 2 out of 3 got impaction colics, and one poor animal zapping himself over and over until the battery wore down, and you couldn't even get near him. Geez.

      Some dogs can have really bad reactions to the shock collars, too. I know of a lovely Airedale whom you couldn't entice in any way to become aggressive in ordinary circumstances -- kids, strangers, other dogs, nothing fazed him -- until his owners put him in a shock collar. He associated the shock with passersby whom he had gone to greet (in a friendly way) and became aggressive and had to be put down.

      Yeah, I know, there are success stories with these things. But there are huge risks, too, that people should be aware of. They CAN (certainly not always) lead to some very, very bad outcomes.

      Before he and I got together, DH used one for his dog. And it simply didn't work -- she'd take the shock to get out, but wouldn't take it to come home -- and simply roamed the neighborhood til he got home from work. Not good.

      Doesn't sound too effective for the cribbers, either, from equinelaw's post.
      Last edited by Rallycairn; Dec. 22, 2008, 10:49 PM.
      If thou hast a sorrow, tell it not to the arrow, tell it to thy saddlebow, and ride on, singing. -- King Alfred the Great

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      • #4
        We used a dog shock collar around the nose to stop one horse from removing his buddies turn out blankets. We strapped it on at the halter noseband, and hid in the feed room to watch for him to start his handywork. Then ZAP. Cured him quick.
        Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans

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        • #5
          Wizard, the TB I'm riding, is a terrible cribber. Wizard's owner tried the automatic anti-cribbing shock collar on him and the little bugger figured out a way to contort his neck and crib WITH the collar still on.
          Sarah K. Andrew | Twitter | Blog | Horses & Hope calendar | Flickr | Instagram

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          • #6
            Originally posted by equinelaw View Post
            The Zap caused him to run around in a very collected frame which kept zapping him. I couldn't get near the horse for 2 months until the battery wore down.
            That is a hilarious mental image.

            I guess it 'could' work for some scenarios. But knowing dogs that regularly bust through invisible fences- they just steel themselves for the jolt and crash on through- I wouldn't go out of my way to buy one. When I need to correct a horse by remote control, I find it more fun to use little pebbles- as pebble hits horse I say 'horse's name, NO!' or something similar. They are just so amazed that you can 'make contact' by remote control!

            I do wish my 5 yo would get a zap though- he has chewed completely through 2 extension cords (for the heated bucket) in the past week but this act unfortunately seems to trip the GFI before he gets enough of a zap. Latest rigging, knock wood, is safe so far, next step would need to be a more elaborate PVC pipe installation.

            Comment


            • #7
              I think that you need to be quite circumspect about who you put it on.

              I bought the cribbing one for a mare I own who is the worst cribber, ever. She will crib on a pasture mates' butt, if he'll hold still (which he does, in the winter, with a blanket on ).

              In any event, after shelling out the $100, I carefully adjusted it, put it on her, and stood back to watch. She walked over, cribbed on her stall wall, and, it bit her. She raised her head, and looked thoughtful. Them she cribbed again. It bit her again. This time, she took a step back, and went over to her hay.

              Aha! Thought I...SUCCESS!!! Giggling to myself, I left the barn for a few minutes.

              Came back less than fifteen minutes later, and she looked at me with a BIG grin on her face. I walked over- NO cribbing strap. I searched the stall- finally found pieces of it all over. The strap was fine, but, she had taken it off and crushed the little black box.

              She tolerates the taste of absolutely every one of those nasty woodpaints, too. Amazing.
              When someone shows you who they are, BELIEVE them- Maya Angelou
              www.americansaddlebredsporthorse.net
              http://www.asbsporthorse.blogspot.com/

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              • #8
                Cribbers are so so funny. he he he. It was nice doing research on cribbing because we got all sorts of stuff for free to test, but nothing ever really worked if that sucker wanted to crib bad enough.

                I was emptying out my monster tack trunk last month to send stuff to sunkissed acres and ran across that electric de-cribber. I have never heard of anyone else using one until now!

                I think a shock collar can be useful on the right horse for the right behavior, but not cribbing or weaving or pacing. As can a shaker can or rocks or bugguda buggada bugguda yelling form behind some bushes, but never ever ever ever one that does not need someone to do the shocking!

                I was horrified for 2 months that my horse would colic and keep getting shocked as he rolled and ran away from me. Why he forgave me I will never know, but thats what makes horses so cool

                I put one on the small dog to keep her from barking. 1 shock later I had taught her to fear the outside.3 months or dragging her through the backyard she was convinced bit her. The other dog got shocked once for chewing up the plants. The collar beeped before it shocked. He still jumps 3 feet if the alarm clock gos off or I get an e-mail on aol that beeps.

                None of my animals ever learned from a shock except my heeler who took the invisible fence as a suggestion to be considered on a cost benefit analysis

                I am fairly certain a shock collar would teach me to stop smoking if I had a 24/7 attendant to follow me around!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I wish I had the spare cash to try one on my stall kicker. He starts at five in the morning when HE THINKS that he should be getting fed. The barn is close to the house and he wakes everyone up from the drumming. There is NOTHING that I would like better than to just start shocking the little bastard every time he does it. He doesn't dare do it when I'm in the barn, btw....he'll stand there with a back foot raised, but won't let it connect. It's only when he knows that I can't get him! I can be pretty nasty when I'm woken up two hours early from my precious sleep!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=equinelaw;3746735]I was horrified for 2 months that my horse would colic and keep getting shocked as he rolled and ran away from me. Why he forgave me I will never know, but thats what makes horses so cool

                    I put one on the small dog to keep her from barking. 1 shock later I had taught her to fear the outside.3 months or dragging her through the backyard she was convinced bit her. The other dog got shocked once for chewing up the plants. The collar beeped before it shocked. He still jumps 3 feet if the alarm clock gos off or I get an e-mail on aol that beeps.

                    None of my animals ever learned from a shock except my heeler who took the invisible fence as a suggestion to be considered on a cost benefit analysis
                    QUOTE]



                    As anyone can see, I have to say again these are some damned serious consequences. Be careful if you use these things. I can't imagine not being able to get your horse out of distress for 2 months, especially if your horse had been colicking!

                    And, yeah, becoming that fearful of the outdoors due to just one shock (in the case of the one dog) or panicking at any beep (the second dog) is not really all that unusual -- shocks can be VERY traumatizing for animals, especially when the animal can't properly understand what is causing the punishment. The dog scared of the backyard had no way of understanding it was the barking that caused the shock, not being in the backyard -- the backyard was her best guess and the only thing she (incorrectly) "learned." More examples: dogs who become afraid of going on stairs because they got shocked while climbing or even just near stairs, dogs afraid to go in certain rooms (like the dog afraid of the backyard), etc.

                    It's not a laughing matter. Please weigh all potential unwanted effects carefully. Not every horse, dog, whatever reacts this badly -- but if they do, the reaction can be very, very serious indeed. What if the colic had been life threatening????
                    Last edited by Rallycairn; Dec. 22, 2008, 10:51 PM. Reason: corrected comment on colicking -- "if" horse had colicked
                    If thou hast a sorrow, tell it not to the arrow, tell it to thy saddlebow, and ride on, singing. -- King Alfred the Great

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Somebody has to test this stuff out. If a University says it is not a good idea then it keeps more animals safe. People send stuff in to be tested. I am not going to test stuff on any animal if I think its going to kill them and otherwise I test it on my own animals. If its not safe enough for my own animals I am nt testing it at all.

                      The horse did not colic during that time and it was kind of funny how stupid the whole thing turned out. It was 10 years ago. All animals are not super-sensitive. Mine are because I end up with the ones nobody else wants. They are all extremes of the most extreme kind.

                      Many animals do just fine with a properly used shock, but I can't think of that many uses for horses The kicking might be one of them.

                      If it had been a safe and effective method to prevent cribbing it would have saved a lot of horses from a much worse fate.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think it's a horrible idea, for cribbing or any other reason. I can understand with dogs who bite, how it could be necessary for safety reasons but ONLY as a last resort and VERY temporary. Good old fashioned TRAINING seems a lot more humane, not to mention safe, than zapping a horse every time it does something wrong.
                        I saw the angel in the marble and I set him free. - Michaelangelo

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          this really happened. . .

                          a friend of mine put one of these collars on her good horse and it shorted out and was non stop shocking her horse. it was a miracle that they managed to get it off without anyone being killed. . .he was throwing himself around his stall in a panic.
                          A man must love a thing very much if he not only practices it without any hope of fame or money, but even practices it without any hope of doing it well.--G. K. Chesterton

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                          • #14
                            We had a horse that relentlessly picked on another horse. We waited until his teeth were almost in contact with the victims butt and let him have it. He really thought the other horse had zapped him and he left him alone after that. He would actually go out of his way to avoid him.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Big hitches and shocking horses under the collar.

                              I have a pychotic horse from being shocked.

                              You know, how else would a hitch guy get a wheeler to do most of the pulling, other than a shock collar (hint: training)? Well, by the time I got one of my mares, she is a mental mess. Drives great until something (a noise, sudden movement happens) and she then thinks she is going to get shocked. There is nothing worse than a hyperventilating horse throwing herself on the ground, circling, half-rearing and running backwards while you are in the cart. I have been driving for years and I thought I was a goner when it happened. She ends up trembling and shaking and a mess. She is a great driving horse until "it" sets her off. We worked and worked on here but it is helpless.

                              The recent draft horse journal has a round table of judges and one of them was saying that he marks a hitch down for having the shock controls on the seat next to the driver. EWWW.

                              It took me quite a while to figure it out and quite a while to track down the story. This horse is 100% ruined. Poor girl. She is a sensitive horse and shocking was not only not right, it messed her mind up in all sorts of ways. Be careful. Even for cribbing, for some horses, it is not a solution but a more like a bizarre type of LSD or water boarding that will play mind fuck on your horse.
                              Luistano Stallion standing for 2013: Wolverine UVF
                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IZPHDzgX3s

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                              • #16
                                I dont know, I think shock collars should only be used by experienced trainers with really good timing. Most people do not have near the timing, nor do they understand how to use them, which often results in really bad consequences.

                                My mom is probably one of the best Shutzhund trainers in NA...no doubt. She will use them for the dogs ONCE in a while and I feel competent enough myself but you HAVE to make sure to put the collar on and off many times without using it first because they will start to associate the collar with the shock. It is not good to use it on agression problems, as someone else mentioned, the dog will often just think then that whatever it is agressive towards at that moment "bit it".

                                Most people lack the timing to be able to even teach their dogs to come or sit or heal. It scares me that people like that would use a shock collar.
                                Also, you gotta wonder how horses having metal shoes would effect the shock??
                                www.svhanoverians.com

                                "Simple: Breeding,Training, Riding". Wolfram Wittig.

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                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by equinelaw View Post
                                  Somebody has to test this stuff out. If a University says it is not a good idea then it keeps more animals safe. People send stuff in to be tested. I am not going to test stuff on any animal if I think its going to kill them and otherwise I test it on my own animals. If its not safe enough for my own animals I am nt testing it at all.

                                  The horse did not colic during that time and it was kind of funny how stupid the whole thing turned out. It was 10 years ago. All animals are not super-sensitive. Mine are because I end up with the ones nobody else wants. They are all extremes of the most extreme kind.

                                  Many animals do just fine with a properly used shock, but I can't think of that many uses for horses The kicking might be one of them.

                                  If it had been a safe and effective method to prevent cribbing it would have saved a lot of horses from a much worse fate.

                                  Sorry I was not clear, equinelaw. I was responding to your examples as, well, examples of some of the things that can go wrong, but when I said "you" I really meant the generic plural "you." I should have said "one should be careful" or "one should consider the consequences" or whatever. Didn't mean to address you individually.

                                  Timing of any physically aversive punishment is so critical. And, as has been demonstrated by several pretty extreme examples posted on this thread by different posters, there can be severe consequences with shock -- and no way of predicting BEFORE one tries it whether one's animal is one of the ones who is going to have a severe reaction, even from just one shock. I like the way Cielo put it, much better than I have: it CAN play mind fuck with an animal way beyond anything anyone ever intended to happen.
                                  If thou hast a sorrow, tell it not to the arrow, tell it to thy saddlebow, and ride on, singing. -- King Alfred the Great

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                                  • #18
                                    My life is just one long cautionary tale No offense taken. I think its better to over-react to stupid experiments then to encourage things like shock collars willy-nilly.

                                    I am happy to say in all the cribbing threads I have read on COTH in the last 2 years not one has ever mentioned an electric collar. I am glad

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I can't imagine using a shock collar on a horse. And now that I've read all the things that can go wrong, I'm glad I never thought of it.

                                      I have used a shock collar on one of my dogs. He used to chase horses in my field and I was pretty sure he was going to die when one of them kicked out. I shocked him once and he got the message. A few months later, he forgot and needed a reminder. I'm pretty sure it saved his life.

                                      Long ago we had a house with an electric fence. We had a standard poodle back then. The fence did NOT work for him. He figured out that if he ran really fast, it only hurt for a second. But he wouldn't come back across the wire to come home.
                                      Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
                                      EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.

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                                      • #20
                                        This might mesh well with the Cribbing rings thread.
                                        A pussycat of a horse with a chewed off tail won the triple crown, The Cubs won the world series and Trump won the Presidency.
                                        Don't tell me 'It can't be done.'

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