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An accident waiting to happen--pic only available today, 10/3.

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  • #21
    Originally posted by wireweiners View Post
    They only get hurt from barbed wire if they run through it or get tangled in loose wire.
    Funny my mare got stitches in her neck courtesy of barbed wire and didn't run through it and it wasn't loose. Your statement above is awfully broad and in my horse's case incorrect.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)

    Comment


    • #22
      It's easy to jump to assumption when there is no follow up to say they had permission. It would have been a good opportunity to say it's best to always ask permission first etc. Yes, it is a precious moment caught on film but when you put it to the public it gives people the idea that it is okay to do it with any animal and it may not be. We live in a sue crazy society, sometimes its about protecting yourself at the cost of a child not having a precious moment touching a horse. When its my horse on my property, I prefer to err on the side of safety; no touching or feeding.
      "My treasures do not chink or gleam, they glitter in the sun and neigh at night."

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by sketcher View Post
        And if your horse nibbles, nips or bites then don't have him in a paddock along a road where people can get out and pet them.
        Not everyone has that option. Should they not have horses because people don't have respect for fences and other people's personal property?

        My property backs up to a church, and I've caught the Sunday school kids climbing my fence to pet the "pretty horses" with the full endorsement of their parents. We are double fenced, so you have to enter our property to even touch the horses or cattle, we have no trespassing signs and please don't feed/pet/harrass the animals signs. I and my SO have tried talking to the parents, who told us we were being overdramatic and "don't worry about it". Should I not keep my horses on my property because these people don't respect property boundaries?
        It is only through labor and painful effort, by grim energy and resolute courage, that we move on to better things.
        Theodore Roosevelt

        Comment


        • #24
          I thought this would be a good opportunity to educate friends on Fb about appropriate horse-visiting protocol, so I took a screen shot, saved it as a pic, and shared my thoughts:

          Horses and kids . . . just nothing cuter. However, it’s not always a good idea to stop along the road and visit with new horses without the owner’s permission. Their heads are pretty heavy; if they swing their head to get a fly off, it could easily knock a small child (or adult) backward. Or the horse might be having a grumpy day – we ALL have those.

          It’s only polite to drive a little further to locate the owner, and ask permission to pet the horse, exactly as you would a dog you meet in the park or walking along the street : )


          (ETA: which were clearly borrowed liberally from js's first comment - hope that's ok!).

          Please feel free to use the pic and share your own thoughts. Click image for larger version

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          I ABSOLUTELY realize that this is a safe place to come & vent, but it's also an opportunity to educate the general public, and get them interested in horses in a safe, non-trespassing kind of way.

          Just my $.02
          "Let's face it -- Beezie Madden is NOT looking over her shoulder for me anytime
          soon . . . or ever, even in her worst nightmares."


          Member, Higher Standards Leather Care Addicts Anonymous

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          • #25
            Originally posted by wireweiners View Post
            Don't you people teach your horses to take treats nicely? All of mine are hand fed treats occasionally and all know to wait their turn and take their treat nicely. Anybody getting grabby, pushy or otherwise demonstrating ill manners get a smack on the nose and no treat. My brother can put a treat or mini carrot in his mouth and his mule, Bob, will gently take the treat from him. Its all a matter of training.
            Why do people insist on touching other peoples property and livestock without permission is another question that could be asked? I do not care if my horse is a giant puppy dog, its no more right to pet the animal without asking than if I were to sit in someone's sports car without permission.

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by saje View Post
              A kid patting a horse? Really? One of my favorite memories is that child's view of my sister's horse - that big square muzzle and his breath blowing in my face.
              Oh, the humanity! Me too. I grew up in a family that was a tad mean.... so that big square, gentle muzzle was so different and important for me.

              But Woodstock, NY is so close to CT where there's some controversy about horses being vicious.

              Sigh.
              The armchair saddler
              Politically Pro-Cat

              Comment


              • #27
                Originally posted by hundredacres View Post

                While horses are inherently dangerous to be around, there's no need to give them all a Pit Bull reputation. Spreading common sense about horses is better than spreading fear.
                I see your point. However, the counterpoint to that is that nothing will give horses a reputation for being vicious like biting the fingers off of a small child's hand accidentally.

                ETA: the fact of the matter is that horses ARE dangerous animals due to their size and the fact that they are flight animals with relatively low IQs. They are less dangerous to those of us who have had years of experience and proper training in how to handle them. Encouraging those with no equine expertise to interact with horses without supervision is not going to do any favors for the public's view of horses because, yes, inevitably, someone will get hurt in such situations.

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by sketcher View Post
                  Exactly. Loosen up people if you want the next generation of horse lovers. And if your horse nibbles, nips or bites then don't have him in a paddock along a road where people can get out and pet them.
                  Wow. There is a huge difference between someone who knows about horses hand feeding a treat and someone who doesn't know how to do it correctly feeding a treat. Lots of horses get pushy with hand feeding treats. Some people choose not to ever hand feed treats.
                  I totally disagree that any horse that is fenced along a road is up for grabs as far as hand feeding treats or petting, and that if someone is bitten by such a horse then it is the horse owner's fault for having him along a road. There isn't always a choice in the matter. Not everyone has several appropriately fenced pastures that horses can be moved around in. A lot of us have one pasture that is appropriately fenced, and we have to make it work.

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    I'm just glad my mom didn't know I was supposed to have years of experience before she picked up my first pony at an auction . Gosh, those were the days when we didn't live by the rules of safety.

                    I get what you're saying FA, but I still want people to not be so afraid of horses that there's no way they'll ever let their little ones near a horse. Again, this picture is a second in time with only 2 subjects and no history or background. I can't believe that feathers are getting ruffled.

                    I don't mean to sound sarcastic - if you could hear me speaking you would hear the levity in my voice. It doesn't make me angry, but I do roll my eyes and I wish people would lighten up. When we read the story about the kid from a riding family, in a coma from a fall with no helmet, then we can freak out...this is just silly to me to yammer on about something like this.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      If we didn't live in the world we currently live in, my only reaction to that photo would have been "how cute." I still think it is a lovely picture.

                      However, we live in a world where a perfect stranger can pull off the road, onto your property, walk over to your field and attempt to feed or pet your horse, and having done that, if they get bitten or hurt can turn around and sue the dickens out of you. Now you still might prevail in the long run, but in the meantime you are out a pile of attorneys fees in having to defend yourself.
                      \"Tomorrow is a new day with no mistakes in it.\" Anne of Green Gables

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Originally posted by mvp View Post
                        But Woodstock, NY is so close to CT where there's some controversy about horses being vicious.
                        Photo is presumably from the very horsey town of Woodstock, VT (Valley News, which published the photo, serves that region of VT/NH).

                        As for the CT controversy, not many of us in CT expect the state supreme court to echo the poorly woorded "naturally inclined to do mischief or be vicious" finding of the appellate court. Their ruling on the liability in this matter (horse owner vs. parent in a similar kid petting horse situation) is a lot more relevant than the "vicious" thing!

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Originally posted by dags View Post
                          And I have to agree with this, especially after the viscous horse hoopla in Connecticut.
                          Oh no, not viscous horses. I hate it when they get all soft and runny and sticky; it makes it tough to keep tack on them. I might cause a little hoopla too in that case.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            You are my hero.

                            Originally posted by Mara View Post
                            Oh no, not viscous horses. I hate it when they get all soft and runny and sticky; it makes it tough to keep tack on them. I might cause a little hoopla too in that case.
                            But, honestly, now that I live west of the Mississippi, I've discovered that a) horses can coexist with barbed wire; and b) Western horse people have MUCH higher expectations in terms of horse behavior than Eastern horse people do. Someone out here who had a horse that was a danger to a random child would consider it more of a responsibility to keep the horse away from kids than the other way around.

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                            • #34
                              Originally posted by hundredacres View Post
                              I'm just glad my mom didn't know I was supposed to have years of experience before she picked up my first pony at an auction . Gosh, those were the days when we didn't live by the rules of safety.

                              I get what you're saying FA, but I still want people to not be so afraid of horses that there's no way they'll ever let their little ones near a horse. Again, this picture is a second in time with only 2 subjects and no history or background. I can't believe that feathers are getting ruffled.

                              I don't mean to sound sarcastic - if you could hear me speaking you would hear the levity in my voice. It doesn't make me angry, but I do roll my eyes and I wish people would lighten up. When we read the story about the kid from a riding family, in a coma from a fall with no helmet, then we can freak out...this is just silly to me to yammer on about something like this.
                              Yes, I understand and am taking your comments in the spirit in which they are intended. I'm not overly worked up about the photo, or the debate itself, really. But I will say that I've had the experience of my horse getting a small child's fingers in his mouth (accidentally) while she was feeding him a treat. I think I almost passed out. My horse was a very good boy and did not bite down, he let go immediately because he realized that he had something in his mouth that wasn't treat. The child in question had been properly socialized around horses and knew how to hand feed a treat safely (and my horse is wonderful about taking treats politely). She looked at me in horror when he got her fingers in his mouth and then immediately laughed and said, "Hey! He didn't bite down!"

                              Anyway, the thought of a kid hand feeding anything to my horse without me present, or really interacting with him at all without me present IS upsetting to me. Not all horses are "kids" types, and not all horses can be trained to be "kids" types. It's not for the general public to decide, and horse owners should not be put in the position of incurring possible legal liability because the uninformed show up wanting to pet horses.

                              All of that said, who the heck knows what is going on in the photo. Not enough detail to say.

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Ack The only accident waiting to happen is the barbed wire!
                                NEVER! Have seen two horse maimed from it. Would never ever ever use it!

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by wireweiners View Post
                                  I

                                  Don't you people teach your horses to take treats nicely?
                                  Yes
                                  VP Horse & Carriage Association of NYC

                                  https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-F...ref=ts&fref=ts

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                                  • Original Poster

                                    #37
                                    Yes, the photo was taken in Woodstock, Vermont. Lots of horses and lots of visitors in the area.
                                    The virtual "woodshed" seems the only remedy for willful fools .

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Okay. I dont see the article...though I did see the most popular read today was about itchy nipples. o_O

                                      is there a direct link?
                                      Clancy 17hh chestnut Dutch WB, '99. Owned and loved since '04 and still goin'!

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        I'm not someone who melts for children but I do get a little melty when I'm working a pet adoption event and a child asks if the can pet my puppy. Good manners AND an animal lover!
                                        JS it's not beeyootchy to ask people not to feed your horses. It is however beeyootchy to yell at your neighbors when a calm conversation would do.

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Originally posted by Thoroughbred in Color View Post
                                          Not everyone has that option. Should they not have horses because people don't have respect for fences and other people's personal property?

                                          My property backs up to a church, and I've caught the Sunday school kids climbing my fence to pet the "pretty horses" with the full endorsement of their parents. We are double fenced, so you have to enter our property to even touch the horses or cattle, we have no trespassing signs and please don't feed/pet/harrass the animals signs. I and my SO have tried talking to the parents, who told us we were being overdramatic and "don't worry about it". Should I not keep my horses on my property because these people don't respect property boundaries?
                                          Yes, If I were so worried about some kid losing their fingers in my horses mouth I would find another arrangement that meant the horses were not visible from the road.

                                          If I were double fenced with appropriate signage and some moron parent let their kids trespass and then had the temerity to sue me, I would gladly see them in court.

                                          And yes, if I were double fenced and kids were climbing the fence to get to my horses, I would most certainly have some strong words with the parents.

                                          But I personally am not double fenced by choice. I moved to a horse friendly town and my paddock is on the road and if some kid with or without their parents wants to pet the horse then so be it. I love when the teenage girls go by and stop to pet my mare when she is home and remember what it was like as a teen to be besotted by horses and have people who would share them with me in any number of small ways.

                                          I carry plenty of insurance. But I chose to believe that if some kid gets bitten. most of the people around me would not be running to their lawyer. And if they do, that's what the insurance is for.

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