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Young girl from Maine rescues 2 slaughter-bound young horses in Washington State!

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  • jenm
    replied
    Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
    I don't want to offend you JenM, but in my opinion, the auction volunteers in this situation are just giving free advertising to the kill buyers and the auction houses. I really believe in working on the front end to keep them from going to auction in the first place rather than the back end.
    in the first place.
    .
    No offense taken. As a matter of fact I agree with you.

    However, this group does work really hard on the front end as well. They do their best to educate owners, intercept horses off craigslist and help to get horses out of bad living conditions.

    In a perfect world, they would be able to intercept the horses before they go to auction and then take a one way trip resulting in their death.

    They are not a 501c3, not a rescue, and they don't profit at all from the sales of the horses. From what I can tell, the horses are being sold at close to meat prices, so there is no extra money tacked on because of their situation.

    I think what is evident when it comes to "saving" a horse is the story is much more compelling to the general public when the horse comes from a kill buyer rather than a CL ad, therefore, I really doubt we will ever see a news story about a young woman who bought a horse off CL!

    Leave a comment:


  • Equine Studies
    replied
    Originally posted by Alagirl View Post
    So few time we do agree....

    The COTH bandwagon usually only pitches in to remedy a short term situation, until a more permanent home for the critter is found, with somebody who can afford all of the cost.
    It's not there to subsidize the next 30 years or so of horse ownership....
    True enough and I've sent dribbles to the COTH projects. Definitely a lot more thought and expertise involved in what gets accomplished on here. But maybe, just maybe it'll work out for them (trying to have an optimistic moment).

    Leave a comment:


  • LauraKY
    replied
    Originally posted by Alagirl View Post
    So few time we do agree....

    The COTH bandwagon usually only pitches in to remedy a short term situation, until a more permanent home for the critter is found, with somebody who can afford all of the cost.
    It's not there to subsidize the next 30 years or so of horse ownership....
    I suspect we agree more often then you might think.

    Leave a comment:


  • Alagirl
    replied
    Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
    There's a difference between the COTH bandwagons and this situation. Someone keeps track of the money, quite a few knowledgeable people are involved. There is much less chance of an ulterior motive with someone taking on a horse that they are just not able to care for, financially, mentally and physically.

    I don't want to offend you JenM, but in my opinion, the auction volunteers in this situation are just giving free advertising to the kill buyers and the auction houses. I really believe in working on the front end to keep them from going to auction in the first place rather than the back end.

    I think it's a crazy waste of money to ship horses across the country...sounds like she was ripped off on the purchase price too. I'm so tired of "the truck is coming." Yes it is. Let's do something about the truck and how they got there in the first place.


    Different strokes for different folks.
    So few time we do agree....

    The COTH bandwagon usually only pitches in to remedy a short term situation, until a more permanent home for the critter is found, with somebody who can afford all of the cost.
    It's not there to subsidize the next 30 years or so of horse ownership....

    Leave a comment:


  • LauraKY
    replied
    There's a difference between the COTH bandwagons and this situation. Someone keeps track of the money, quite a few knowledgeable people are involved. There is much less chance of an ulterior motive with someone taking on a horse that they are just not able to care for, financially, mentally and physically.

    I don't want to offend you JenM, but in my opinion, the auction volunteers in this situation are just giving free advertising to the kill buyers and the auction houses. I really believe in working on the front end to keep them from going to auction in the first place rather than the back end.

    I think it's a crazy waste of money to ship horses across the country...sounds like she was ripped off on the purchase price too. I'm so tired of "the truck is coming." Yes it is. Let's do something about the truck and how they got there in the first place.


    Different strokes for different folks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Equine Studies
    replied
    Originally posted by Hinderella View Post
    While the article does indicate that the girl continues to look for some assistance with these horses, I still don't see how that's much different from the various COTH bandwagons that have rescued other horses in the past.
    It took 50 posts for someone to say this..........
    maybe instead of bitching we should send dribbles to this kid, whose heart is at least in the right place. Even though the odds seem to be against her.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pronzini
    replied
    Your reality appears to be my reality as well. When you board at a large urban facility for over a decade, people come and go as do their horses. An awful lot are first time owners all full of good intentions and quite a few thought they "rescued" their horses-from the track or an auction or the classifieds or elsewhere.

    Then came the lameness or the training issue or the job loss or the responsibilities or some other life change and sometimes the "rescued" horses just disappeared as quick as 6 months later in a couple of cases. I remember one lady gave away her horse because she wanted a new car. Another one literally decided to go husband hunting and all the time at the barn was cramping her style so the horse had to go.

    And I'm not even critical of any of that because I think horses still have to fit into people's lives rather than the other way around but for God's sake don't call it a rescue. I have a hard time seeing this as a rescue either.

    I hope there is a safety net or you may be right that the girl learns all kinds of lessons but maybe not the ones intended.

    Originally posted by D_BaldStockings View Post
    One young horse, with parents who know horses or livestock? Very true.

    2 horses? Double the costs.
    Parents willing to let the child get 2 large, expensive to maintain animals? They don't sound knowledgeable to me.

    Plus they have stated she will need to cover the bills herself.
    They may not be indigent, but are they treating the horses as 'family members' or a daughter's project that they may dump quickly (give away to a safe home/ kill buyer?) if the expenses start to mount?

    Hiring a trainer is still hiring a trainer, even if he is a cowboy at the barn. If she can't afford board, vet, farrier; you think cowboy should just donate his time?

    Pony Club and 4-H would be great, I hope someone gets her into either of those programs, but I doubt she is now.
    RFD TV is not likely to solve her lack of hands on knowledge.
    Green on green = black and blue is as true today as it ever was.

    Your 'Reality' simply does not match mine.

    I hope she moves one or both of the horses to another owner so she may be able to mostly care for one of them financially with some help from her parents, and I hope they step up.
    I hope she manages to continue to lesson to improve her chances of riding these horses when they are old enough.
    I hope the people at her boarding barn are knowledgeable and helpful; and that they talk to her parents about financial projections.

    The 'rescue' donations will dry up. Probably about January at the latest.
    2 horses and less/no money is never a good plan in winter. I'm not seeing a safety net here for the horses.
    I expect they will quietly 'go down the road' when the family realizes the costs involved.

    You may be very right about the girl learning 'the hard realities of life.'

    Leave a comment:


  • RubyTuesday
    replied
    Originally posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
    Back in the 1970's both vaccines and dental care were considered strictly optional for most people's horses, and so was deworming. Our school herd got none of the above unless there was a problem until the late 80's--of course, we rotated them on very large pastures, they were turned out 24/7, the fields were kept short-mowed and people SHOT deer and varmints, so there were a lot fewer diseases around. Most of our horses were working through their late twenties just fine--and barefoot! Not what I do today, obviously, but I thought you might find that interesting. We all survived . . .
    The deer and others still need shooting... :P

    Leave a comment:


  • RubyTuesday
    replied
    Originally posted by hundredacres View Post
    Nope. No worming either. The farrier came 4 times a YEAR. And for what it's worth, no lessons, no helmet, no proper saddle, and no fancy boots to keep me from dying.....the 1970's were amazing. Nobody ever told us we couldn't.

    I'm not saying I agree with this situation - because it's not the 1970's anymore. If it were, we wouldn't be having this conversation since back then I think people minded their own business more often.
    Back then, no internet and no instant 24/7/365 information. It is a blessing AND a curse at the same time.

    Leave a comment:


  • RubyTuesday
    replied
    Originally posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    I want to know in what kind if fairy tale does hay run $5 a bale.

    I just wrote a check to my friend for $35 for one bale of timothy hay ($29.95 +9% tax +$2.75 delivery charge.). Okay, it's a huge bale with over 15 4-pound flakes, but still.
    I just bought 150 bales of *very* nice grass hay for $3.50 a bale today. Heavy 50-60 pound bales. It can still happen with the right network of people.

    Leave a comment:


  • LauraKY
    replied
    Originally posted by jenm View Post
    You are welcome. You know I won't give a thumbs up to anyone I haven't vetted out!
    Yes, I do.

    Leave a comment:


  • jenm
    replied
    Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
    Thanks for the info on the volunteers.
    You are welcome. You know I won't give a thumbs up to anyone I haven't vetted out!

    Leave a comment:


  • Lady Eboshi
    replied
    Originally posted by hundredacres View Post
    Nope. No worming either. The farrier came 4 times a YEAR. And for what it's worth, no lessons, no helmet, no proper saddle, and no fancy boots to keep me from dying.....the 1970's were amazing. Nobody ever told us we couldn't.

    I'm not saying I agree with this situation - because it's not the 1970's anymore. If it were, we wouldn't be having this conversation since back then I think people minded their own business more often.
    AMEN!!! on all counts!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Lady Eboshi
    replied
    Originally posted by Alagirl View Post
    You are catching on.
    That's when you realize how big a bliss ignorance is when nothing happened.
    Back in the 1970's both vaccines and dental care were considered strictly optional for most people's horses, and so was deworming. Our school herd got none of the above unless there was a problem until the late 80's--of course, we rotated them on very large pastures, they were turned out 24/7, the fields were kept short-mowed and people SHOT deer and varmints, so there were a lot fewer diseases around. Most of our horses were working through their late twenties just fine--and barefoot! Not what I do today, obviously, but I thought you might find that interesting. We all survived . . .

    Leave a comment:


  • Lady Eboshi
    replied
    Originally posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    I want to know in what kind if fairy tale does hay run $5 a bale.

    I just wrote a check to my friend for $35 for one bale of timothy hay ($29.95 +9% tax +$2.75 delivery charge.). Okay, it's a huge bale with over 15 4-pound flakes, but still.
    Dunno where you are, but a farmer friend called me the other day and begged me to pick a load up right off of his field for just that--$5/bale.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pleiad
    replied
    Originally posted by hundredacres View Post
    Nope. No worming either. The farrier came 4 times a YEAR. And for what it's worth, no lessons, no helmet, no proper saddle, and no fancy boots to keep me from dying.....the 1970's were amazing. Nobody ever told us we couldn't.

    I'm not saying I agree with this situation - because it's not the 1970's anymore. If it were, we wouldn't be having this conversation since back then I think people minded their own business more often.
    My Morgan only needs trimmed every 12 weeks. She has awesome feet and is ridden in a sand arena so her feet get filed every time I ride her. And yeah , the 70s and 80s were awesome. Being 5 and riding bareback with a a halter in the neighbors back lot. Being handed a very green 4 year old when I was 11 and being told "If you want her to be a show horse then turn her into one." Holy crap I can't believe the way things have changed. My parents would have had CPS called on them today, but those are the best memories of my life. I realized I COULD train a horse all by myself, who would have thought???? (Ok, the stable owner gave me some pointers, but nobody rode my horse but me.)

    Besides not all kids are the same. Some kids are tougher and more determined than others. There are kids who, at 12, could train and care for these two horses with some help. I hope she does it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Alagirl
    replied
    Originally posted by hundredacres View Post
    Nope. No worming either. The farrier came 4 times a YEAR. And for what it's worth, no lessons, no helmet, no proper saddle, and no fancy boots to keep me from dying.....the 1970's were amazing. Nobody ever told us we couldn't.

    I'm not saying I agree with this situation - because it's not the 1970's anymore. If it were, we wouldn't be having this conversation since back then I think people minded their own business more often.
    back then you didn't ship low end horses across country either...or expected others to donate to your dream....

    Leave a comment:


  • LauraKY
    replied
    Originally posted by jenm View Post
    They aren't a rescue, and they do not sell or "collect bail" for any horses. They are simply a dedicated group of people who network in order to give horses one last chance at a home before they really are shipped to slaughter. They don't collect any fees, the payment terms are handled directly by the person interested in the horse and the auction or KB who purchased the horse at auction.



    I worked very closely with one of the main people behind Auction Horses back when we really felt CBER stood a chance of being turned around. We spent horses on the phone creating what we felt was a really great plan. The more we talked, the more we began to put several puzzle pieces in place in which we began to discover just how badly things really were under the surface. We only gave up when we realized she had such a solid strong hold on CBER that there was not chance of ousting her and making CBER legit.

    I have a lot of respect for the women I worked with, and am glad that someone was able to continue to help horses for all the right reasons and not feel the need to be in the limelight.

    The people behind Auction Horses are all volunteers, no one collects any money, and they don't claim to be something they aren't.

    Anyone could have gone directly to the auction and purchased those horses. In this instance, it just so happened to be a young girl who is now getting her 15 minutes of fame.

    I would like to think her action may inspire other responsible people to do the same thing be it in their own area or not.
    Thanks for the info on the volunteers.

    Leave a comment:


  • arabhorse2
    replied
    Originally posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    I want to know in what kind if fairy tale does hay run $5 a bale.
    That's expensive. I pay $3.50 a bale for 55-60 pound bales.

    Leave a comment:


  • hundredacres
    replied
    Originally posted by trubandloki View Post
    No vaccines? No dental care?
    Nope. No worming either. The farrier came 4 times a YEAR. And for what it's worth, no lessons, no helmet, no proper saddle, and no fancy boots to keep me from dying.....the 1970's were amazing. Nobody ever told us we couldn't.

    I'm not saying I agree with this situation - because it's not the 1970's anymore. If it were, we wouldn't be having this conversation since back then I think people minded their own business more often.

    Leave a comment:

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