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Young girl from Maine rescues 2 slaughter-bound young horses in Washington State!

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    #61
    I did not read the whole article because when I clicked it I was required to give information to read the rest. So excuse me if this is answered in that article.

    Are her parent's there to support the horses when she does not have enough money?

    I think a tween with drive is a good thing. I think a tween with drive that has parents that let the tween get into a bad situation, even with good intentions, is a crappy thing.
    I hope behind the scenes the parents of said tween have the funds and the know how to help her with these two horses and all this is just publicity because someone wanted to write a do-good story, not because the kid will have no cash shortly.
    Last edited by trubandloki; Sep. 5, 2013, 03:56 PM. Reason: clearly I was liking apostrophes a little too much when I typed this.

    Comment


      #62
      I read the article before they inserted the question/ad block. The parents said they expected her to use her own money. Admittedly basing my opinion on my own experience, and on families that I know, I took that to mean that the parents said something along the lines of "OK, Meghan, if that's what you want to do, but you're going to have to put all of your own money into this, don't think we'll be spending our money while you take yours to the mall"
      The story was that she was originally looking for a riding horse, perhaps a lease. So it seems that the parents knew she was looking, and knew what she decided. There was really nothing in the article to lead you to believe that the parents would simply refuse to support the horses if the daughter falls short of what she needs.
      I wish her all the best.

      Comment


        #63
        They'll be at a boarding stable--that means the likelihood of professional guidance. Someone above has stated the farrier is very good and not expensive. I'm sure the boarding stable has a veterinarian on call. Raising a young horse at that age has long been thought of in agricultural circles as a good bet to teach personal and financial responsibility, compassion, the hard realities of life, and excellent handling skills to a teen--and at the same time, keeps them more interested in horses than boys, drugs, and the mall, a huge plus right there. Lastly, backing and starting a three-year-old is not rocket science and does not require exalted credentials--probably just the local cowboy who may already ride at the barn.

        Plenty of Pony Clubbers and 4-H kids are doing something similar, all across this country. And I'm sure the parents are not indigent. The conclusions jumped to in this thread are astounding--and if I didn't know y'all were ADULTS, I'd swear you were freakin' JEALOUS! The snarkers sound just like junior-high BB's!

        More power to 'er, may there be blue ribbons and a scholarship in her future!

        Comment


          #64
          I wish all the luck to this girl. I admire her drive and I hope these horses work out great for her.

          I am not so happy with the journalist who wrote this article, about Saaaving teh pooor horsies. Not because the horses weren't in danger, but because a person of any age in Maine shipping rescue horses sight unseen in from Washington is not exactly an efficient use of resources. We have people in California reading on the internet about horses in need at New Holland and PMU farms and northeastern race tracks and shipping the horses west, and people in the east likewise. And it's all about falling in love with a picture and a description.

          It goes to show how important it is to have those websites for all localities, I guess, so people can always be guided back to animals in need that are more local. And how much those pictures and descriptions matter in what horses get homes.

          I would encourage people at rescues to be aware of this fact and to consider nudging people who contact them back to a local rescue, or a more appropriate animal, and not to simply feel that a placement is a placement, that getting the horse off your books is the priority. You can say, "You know, we have/there are older, trained horses that need loving homes that might fit your life better." You can say, "You know, I know of a rescue nearer to you where you'd be able to visit the horses and make a more direct choice among horses who really need homes." Most of you do this, and I appreciate it, very much.

          I appreciate that in general COTH has been very skeptical about using "rescue" money to ship relatively ordinary rescue horses long distances, and been encouraging people inclined to do so to look more locally. If it's a special horse in some characteristic (like a dispersal of a farm of a rare breed), that is different.

          Of course, it also then means you have to confront the problem in a larger way, of how many horses fall through the cracks.
          If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

          Comment


            #65
            The line no one else seemed to pick up on was that the parents let her do everything EXCEPT call the kill buyers.
            ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
            Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

            "Life is merrier with a terrier!"

            Comment


              #66
              Although, I wrote a critical post on this thread, I want to be clear that I don't fault the 12 year old. But I do wonder what the heck the adults in her life were thinking. It just seems like they could have hooked her up with volunteering with a local rescue, so she had some experience of what she was getting herself into long term before committing to the expensive, long term care of two youngsters.

              I'm glad the two youngsters ended up in a better place. But "rescues" that prey upon the pocket books of folks seeking a Disney tale drive me nuts. Granted, it certainly is a buyer beware situation, but pawning off a second youngster on a kid seems like a low blow.

              Comment


                #67
                Originally posted by Kryswyn View Post
                The line no one else seemed to pick up on was that the parents let her do everything EXCEPT call the kill buyers.
                Yep, I caught that.

                Comment


                  #68
                  Originally posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
                  They'll be at a boarding stable--that means the likelihood of professional guidance. Someone above has stated the farrier is very good and not expensive. I'm sure the boarding stable has a veterinarian on call. Raising a young horse at that age has long been thought of in agricultural circles as a good bet to teach personal and financial responsibility, compassion, the hard realities of life, and excellent handling skills to a teen--and at the same time, keeps them more interested in horses than boys, drugs, and the mall, a huge plus right there. Lastly, backing and starting a three-year-old is not rocket science and does not require exalted credentials--probably just the local cowboy who may already ride at the barn.

                  Plenty of Pony Clubbers and 4-H kids are doing something similar, all across this country. And I'm sure the parents are not indigent. The conclusions jumped to in this thread are astounding--and if I didn't know y'all were ADULTS, I'd swear you were freakin' JEALOUS! The snarkers sound just like junior-high BB's!

                  More power to 'er, may there be blue ribbons and a scholarship in her future!
                  One young horse, with parents who know horses or livestock? Very true.

                  2 horses? Double the costs.
                  Parents willing to let the child get 2 large, expensive to maintain animals? They don't sound knowledgeable to me.

                  Plus they have stated she will need to cover the bills herself.
                  They may not be indigent, but are they treating the horses as 'family members' or a daughter's project that they may dump quickly (give away to a safe home/ kill buyer?) if the expenses start to mount?

                  Hiring a trainer is still hiring a trainer, even if he is a cowboy at the barn. If she can't afford board, vet, farrier; you think cowboy should just donate his time?

                  Pony Club and 4-H would be great, I hope someone gets her into either of those programs, but I doubt she is now.
                  RFD TV is not likely to solve her lack of hands on knowledge.
                  Green on green = black and blue is as true today as it ever was.

                  Your 'Reality' simply does not match mine.

                  I hope she moves one or both of the horses to another owner so she may be able to mostly care for one of them financially with some help from her parents, and I hope they step up.
                  I hope she manages to continue to lesson to improve her chances of riding these horses when they are old enough.
                  I hope the people at her boarding barn are knowledgeable and helpful; and that they talk to her parents about financial projections.

                  The 'rescue' donations will dry up. Probably about January at the latest.
                  2 horses and less/no money is never a good plan in winter. I'm not seeing a safety net here for the horses.
                  I expect they will quietly 'go down the road' when the family realizes the costs involved.

                  You may be very right about the girl learning 'the hard realities of life.'

                  Comment


                    #69
                    Ok, this kid is 12. The 2 horses she bought are a yearling and a weanling. So they'll be ready to be backed when she's around 15 or so. Not so far fetched that she could do it herself with the proper experience or supervision, or find someone to do it cheap. The kid is interviewed in the article, and doesn't seem like a little girl. She even recognizes that the problem is the backyard breeders, not slaughter. She seems like a good, competent kid, and she's doing right by the horses that she rescued.

                    She was expected to pay for the horses. She did. Other people offered to pay for shipping and board. She could have paid for it if she had to, she has $1400 left over. But nowhere does the article say that if she runs out of money the horses will be less than well cared for. My parents expected me to pay for what I could, but if I couldn't pay for shoes with my babysitting money they would step up and pay the bill. My (unsuitable 3 year old) 1st pony did not go wanting. I don't think these 2 will either. And right now? They don't need much. Food, water, shelter, and hoof care. And it looks like they have it, at a discounted $400 a month.

                    Some parents want their child to learn responsibility. If they can pay for these 2, and provide them a better life, why not let the kid save them? She could have been the selfish, all about me child we all detest and ignore them because she couldn't immediately win ribbons on them.

                    Comment


                      #70
                      Originally posted by Perfect10 View Post
                      Ok, this kid is 12. The 2 horses she bought are a yearling and a weanling. So they'll be ready to be backed when she's around 15 or so. Not so far fetched that she could do it herself with the proper experience or supervision, or find someone to do it cheap. The kid is interviewed in the article, and doesn't seem like a little girl. She even recognizes that the problem is the backyard breeders, not slaughter. She seems like a good, competent kid, and she's doing right by the horses that she rescued.

                      She was expected to pay for the horses. She did. Other people offered to pay for shipping and board. She could have paid for it if she had to, she has $1400 left over. But nowhere does the article say that if she runs out of money the horses will be less than well cared for. My parents expected me to pay for what I could, but if I couldn't pay for shoes with my babysitting money they would step up and pay the bill. My (unsuitable 3 year old) 1st pony did not go wanting. I don't think these 2 will either. And right now? They don't need much. Food, water, shelter, and hoof care. And it looks like they have it, at a discounted $400 a month.

                      Some parents want their child to learn responsibility. If they can pay for these 2, and provide them a better life, why not let the kid save them? She could have been the selfish, all about me child we all detest and ignore them because she couldn't immediately win ribbons on them.
                      How long to 1400 bucks last with two horses?

                      Comment


                        #71
                        Originally posted by Alagirl View Post
                        How long to 1400 bucks last with two horses?
                        You are assuming she won't continue to earn any money beyond that.
                        Kind of like all the other assumptions being thrown out on this thread.

                        Comment


                          #72
                          Or the kid learns a valuable lesson. Yanno the kind of lessons kids usta learn. Either way the horses probably have more of chance than they did...

                          Comment


                            #73
                            Originally posted by D_BaldStockings View Post
                            One young horse, with parents who know horses or livestock? Very true.

                            2 horses? Double the costs.
                            Parents willing to let the child get 2 large, expensive to maintain animals? They don't sound knowledgeable to me.

                            Plus they have stated she will need to cover the bills herself.
                            They may not be indigent, but are they treating the horses as 'family members' or a daughter's project that they may dump quickly (give away to a safe home/ kill buyer?) if the expenses start to mount?

                            Hiring a trainer is still hiring a trainer, even if he is a cowboy at the barn. If she can't afford board, vet, farrier; you think cowboy should just donate his time?

                            Pony Club and 4-H would be great, I hope someone gets her into either of those programs, but I doubt she is now.
                            RFD TV is not likely to solve her lack of hands on knowledge.
                            Green on green = black and blue is as true today as it ever was.

                            Your 'Reality' simply does not match mine.

                            I hope she moves one or both of the horses to another owner so she may be able to mostly care for one of them financially with some help from her parents, and I hope they step up.
                            I hope she manages to continue to lesson to improve her chances of riding these horses when they are old enough.
                            I hope the people at her boarding barn are knowledgeable and helpful; and that they talk to her parents about financial projections.

                            The 'rescue' donations will dry up. Probably about January at the latest.
                            2 horses and less/no money is never a good plan in winter. I'm not seeing a safety net here for the horses.
                            I expect they will quietly 'go down the road' when the family realizes the costs involved.

                            You may be very right about the girl learning 'the hard realities of life.'
                            We have no idea what the parents' real finances are...they may well be able to afford it and have a safety net but want this to be all HER project. If that is the case, more power to them instead of just handing her the world.

                            Comment


                              #74
                              Originally posted by Alagirl View Post
                              How long to 1400 bucks last with two horses?
                              Read the whole article...she didn't quit working when the horses landed in Maine.

                              Comment


                                #75
                                Originally posted by sunridge1 View Post
                                Or the kid learns a valuable lesson. Yanno the kind of lessons kids usta learn. Either way the horses probably have more of chance than they did...
                                Yes on both counts. She'll come to know something real instead of video games.

                                Comment


                                  #76
                                  Originally posted by horsepoor View Post
                                  You are assuming she won't continue to earn any money beyond that.
                                  Kind of like all the other assumptions being thrown out on this thread.
                                  No, I am assuming that she is one misstep away from disaster.

                                  I fond it interesting that folks like Lady Eboshi, who are adamant that nobody without the equivalent of a college fund for horses should be allowed to own one. You know, emergency vet bills, euthing and disposal...so far the young lady is about 600 in the hole on that.

                                  It won't look better when the donations dry up, now school is back in session, s time to work is less, or play with the horses.
                                  and while I admire her enthusiasm, can a 12 yo realistically expect to earn enough money month by month to keep two horses up?
                                  If it was that easy, we would not have to come up with ideas for adults on a regular basis.

                                  All the high flying ideas, what she could do and earn and put value on these two horses....yeah, in a Disney kind of world.
                                  She could realistically expect something like this with a grown horse she could actually ride. So but the time sh can ride those two, she could already have gathered experience riding and training, possibly showing.


                                  true, maybe we have it all wrong.
                                  Maybe the parents are loaded, just make the girl shovel manure for the heck of it.

                                  But like with all the other feel good stories, I doubt we'll hear a follow up, good bad or indifferent.

                                  Comment


                                    #77
                                    Alagirl, I don't know about you, but I certainly don't have a trust fund. Consequently, like most of the world, I'm one layoff notice away from disaster. And yet I carry on. As this young lady will, despite the assurances from so many here that she will certainlay fail.
                                    Let us hope she can prove all the naysayers wrong.

                                    Comment


                                      #78
                                      Originally posted by RiderInTheRain View Post
                                      Although, I wrote a critical post on this thread, I want to be clear that I don't fault the 12 year old. But I do wonder what the heck the adults in her life were thinking. It just seems like they could have hooked her up with volunteering with a local rescue, so she had some experience of what she was getting herself into long term before committing to the expensive, long term care of two youngsters.

                                      I'm glad the two youngsters ended up in a better place. But "rescues" that prey upon the pocket books of folks seeking a Disney tale drive me nuts. Granted, it certainly is a buyer beware situation, but pawning off a second youngster on a kid seems like a low blow.
                                      Same here - I was not criticizing the 12 yr old. I think this was a bad idea, but she clearly has her heart in the right place, and I admire that she is willing to work for what she wants.

                                      I can offer a unique perspective on this situation. When I was 17 I adopted a horse from a LOCAL rescue for $200. I had been an active volunteer there for a year and was very familiar with the horse. (And of course IN LOVE with him!)

                                      However, being a teenager I of course overestimated my skills. The horse was 7 years old, unbroke, and suffered from severe anxiety issues. My parents were in a position financially to help me out, but I also did self-care boarding and was at the barn every day. It turns out though that love and enthusiasm was not nearly enough to deal with such a difficult horse.

                                      Although I did have a trainer and worked with him every day, I never rode him in the 6 months that he was with me. And unfortunately one day he had a panic attack and ran through the 5 board fence - fatally injuring himself.

                                      It was a traumatic and devestating event for me as a young person, and affected my interactions with horses for many years. I had been in WAY over my head with this horse. Plus while my parents were always supportive when it came to my equestrian endeavors, they had no actual horse experience. Just like the 12 year old, my heart was in the right place, but my lack of experience proved to be too much.

                                      I really do hope that she gets the right guidance and wish her the best with these 2 young horses. I just hope she doesn't regret missing out on riding like I did.

                                      P.S. - When I was a young adult I adopted another young horse from the same rescue. I backed/trained her myself and she became my once-in-a-lifetime horse. I wouldn't trade that experience for the world - she was the most incredible horse I've ever known. So yeah - happy ending for me!

                                      Comment


                                        #79
                                        Originally posted by Alagirl View Post
                                        No, I am assuming that she is one misstep away from disaster.

                                        I fond it interesting that folks like Lady Eboshi, who are adamant that nobody without the equivalent of a college fund for horses should be allowed to own one. You know, emergency vet bills, euthing and disposal...so far the young lady is about 600 in the hole on that.

                                        It won't look better when the donations dry up, now school is back in session, s time to work is less, or play with the horses.
                                        and while I admire her enthusiasm, can a 12 yo realistically expect to earn enough money month by month to keep two horses up?
                                        If it was that easy, we would not have to come up with ideas for adults on a regular basis.

                                        All the high flying ideas, what she could do and earn and put value on these two horses....yeah, in a Disney kind of world.
                                        She could realistically expect something like this with a grown horse she could actually ride. So but the time sh can ride those two, she could already have gathered experience riding and training, possibly showing.


                                        true, maybe we have it all wrong.
                                        Maybe the parents are loaded, just make the girl shovel manure for the heck of it.

                                        But like with all the other feel good stories, I doubt we'll hear a follow up, good bad or indifferent.
                                        Again, another ASSumption. Who said this kid was even IN school? She might very well be home-schooled, and many if not most homeschooled kids do not spend the entire day doing school...they don't have to because they don't have the interruptions or the need to be held back so the kid at the bottom of the class can catch up. If she is home schooled, she has more time to spend doing a job and working with her horses instead of mindlessly riding a bus or being shuffled around from class to class and wasting hours of time while waiting on others or in lines. We don't have enough info to say she can't hold her own and get educated.

                                        Comment


                                          #80
                                          Originally posted by RubyTuesday View Post
                                          Again, another ASSumption. Who said this kid was even IN school? She might very well be home-schooled, and many if not most homeschooled kids do not spend the entire day doing school...they don't have to because they don't have the interruptions or the need to be held back so the kid at the bottom of the class can catch up. If she is home schooled, she has more time to spend doing a job and working with her horses instead of mindlessly riding a bus or being shuffled around from class to class and wasting hours of time while waiting on others or in lines. We don't have enough info to say she can't hold her own and get educated.
                                          you are grasping for straws now.

                                          Yes, I know, if you try hard enough you can justify anything!

                                          Yes, if her parents are rich, if she is home schooled....

                                          if the dog had not taken a dump, he'd caught the rabbit....

                                          The deck is stacked against the young lady.
                                          Sure, I won't mind being wrong in a case like that.
                                          But it really is astonishing t see who all is out forcing the rose colored glasses on everybody...
                                          Ti's telling, that's for sure.

                                          Comment

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