• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Have you ever had to ride a horse you hate?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    Originally posted by rustbreeches View Post
    Of course he was slower than molasses in January and eventually they cut off his two largest problems, but I don't think he ever ran better than 4th.
    LMAO!!! You made me spit on my screen

    I received the nicest horse I ever owned when a neighbor decided she "hated him". He was a pill on the ground, pinned ears about anything touching him, but was built like an Advanced Eventer & rode like a dream!!! She eventually regretted the decision when she realized how far I was getting riding him. Her problem was she took it personal - all his attitude & ear pinning. To me, horses just don't think that way, they aren't out to "get you".

    So anyway, make sure you aren't making the horse worse by letting your own attitude affect how you handle & ride him.

    That said I had a horse that didn't like the way I rode or handled him. It was a classic personality clash. I struggled with him for 3 years, and when I finally gave the reins to someone else, wish I'd done it 2.5 years sooner.

    But I was the owner of that horse, and supposedly riding for fun.

    As others have said, if you are an employee, and as long as you aren't scared or feel unsafe on this horse, get your legs around it and get the job done. You'll be rewarded later for being the employee willing to do whatever needs to be done, and it's a good exercise in self discipline!

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #22
      I completely agree that you can learn from any horse, but yes she's charging me for the lessons. I don't want to pay to ride a horse I hate.
      She thinks he's great because he's athletic and can move well but he's quiet. I'll admit he's good in that sense, he's good in shows. But he's just not the horse for me.

      Comment


      • #23
        I guess I still don't understand why you don't like him? If he's athletic, moves well, and is quiet...what is wrong with him that you don't like riding him?
        The Trials and Jubilations of a Twenty-Something Re-rider
        Happy owner of Kieran the mostly-white-very-large-not-pony.

        Comment


        • #24
          I learned long ago that as soon as you tell your riding instructor how much you hate riding a certain horse that horse becomes the horse they want you to ride all the time.

          It sounds like you have a choice. You can ride this horse and learn something from it or you can ride somewhere else. Your trainer obviously sees how this horse might benefit you.

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by Arcadien View Post
            LMAO!!! You made me spit on my screen



            As others have said, if you are an employee, and as long as you aren't scared or feel unsafe on this horse, get your legs around it and get the job done. You'll be rewarded later for being the employee willing to do whatever needs to be done, and it's a good exercise in self discipline!
            Hehe! IME, most colts could do with losing 5 lbs!

            I also wanted to add after I read your part about being afraid, the trainer finally brought in a freelance guy to get on this POS when I started vomiting every morning before I got on him. I have been on hundreds of horses and this one was the first one that made me think he really wanted to kill me. I didn't just hate him for no good reason. Luckily the shedrow foreman liked me and frequently put the colt in a round pen for a bit before anybody showed up.
            Originally posted by The Saddle
            Perhaps I need my flocking adjusted.

            Comment


            • #26
              Hate seems like a strong word for an animal, especially one that has done you no harm.

              Comment


              • #27
                If you are a paying client, trainer still does not have to explain why she says no to any particular horse you ask to ride. But you should have a talk with her about why she wants you on this particular horse. Is there something it can teach you the others can't? Is she pushing you to improve as a rider on the not so easy ones? And why do you call her "boss" if you are paying cash for rides and lessons? Or is this a WS kind of work off swapping labor for rides deal? Need a little more info to offer any meaningful advice regarding sucking it up or changing trainers.
                When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                Comment


                • #28
                  @ rustbreeches, I exercised for one summer in my thirties (call it my mid life crisis lol - I'm back to boring accounting now) -

                  There was only one that scared the beejeesus out of me - he would arbitrarily lay down, and then very carefully & quickly attempt to crush his rider! Fortunately more experienced riders than me wouldn't get on him either. The guy who did was so athletic, he could leap off in a split second and jump back on when the horse got up again. The trainer paid this guy an untold premium.

                  Your trainer sounds like was one of the good ones too. Afterall badly injured exercise riders are pretty useless to the trainer!

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    To OP, if you are paying to ride, that makes it different. Except this is still your boss, so you want to be tactful. Maybe come up with an agreement you will handle the ride for a certain time forward, during which you promise to do your best for the horse, at the end of which you and your boss will have found you something you like better. That gives her time to find the horse you don't like another paying rider, and hopefully with the good work you put in to him he'll be a good mount & you'll have the benefit of the discipline you'll gain making yourself do something you don't really want to. And hopefully maintain a good relationship between you and your boss.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #30
                      Originally posted by analise View Post
                      I guess I still don't understand why you don't like him? If he's athletic, moves well, and is quiet...what is wrong with him that you don't like riding him?
                      I can't really explain why I don't like him, I just don't. I guess I could compare it to getting along with people. Some people you just click with and some you don't. It's not like I'm scared to ride him or anything, and like some people said about riding a difficult horse, he's not hard to ride. I'm happy riding challenging horses. I just don't like him, I can't really explain it.
                      But definitely on the ground I can't stand him. He's very pushy and he doesn't listen when I tell him to move over or anything. My boss/trainer worked on thy last summer but apparently it didn't do any good.

                      Oh also with riding him, he's just awkward to jump. I can't explain why it's awkward but I don't like it, so I guess that's one reason.

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Originally posted by HorseCrazyChick1234 View Post
                        I can't really explain why I don't like him, I just don't. I guess I could compare it to getting along with people. Some people you just click with and some you don't. It's not like I'm scared to ride him or anything, and like some people said about riding a difficult horse, he's not hard to ride. I'm happy riding challenging horses. I just don't like him, I can't really explain it.
                        But definitely on the ground I can't stand him. He's very pushy and he doesn't listen when I tell him to move over or anything. My boss/trainer worked on thy last summer but apparently it didn't do any good.

                        Oh also with riding him, he's just awkward to jump. I can't explain why it's awkward but I don't like it, so I guess that's one reason.
                        I see no reason for you to not ride the horse then... But if you're paying for lessons and "hate" him you can tell the trainer you want a different horse or you will have to take your business elsewhere? I don't know... I don't get that offended by a horse who hasn't attempted to kill me so I can't really relate.

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          I still don't understand if you are trading work to pay off the lessons or are a regular cash paying client. But if you just don't like him, he is not dangerous and you do not own a horse but depend on others to have something to ride?? I don't think you are in a position to refuse to ride anything offered. Unless you want to find another trainer but they may not have anything you care for available for you either.
                          When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                          The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            I used to ride another horse for someone else, with my own instructor. I only did it because she was my boarder, and a big Percheron bully that eeded a job, so the owner who didn't ride, asked if I would ride her if she paid for it. One day my instructor said, "You don't treat this horse the same way you do the others.", which hit me like a ton of bricks. I really hated her owner and it reflected in the way I treated the mare, which was hardly fair to the horse. My attitude slowly changed after that - I realized that it's not the horse's fault, that she was only a reflection of me.

                            I say ride what you can and remember it's an animal. I'm not sure how a person can "hate" an animal, but if you are as young as I think you are, you just need to realize you've got a lot to learn from that horse.

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Originally posted by HorseCrazyChick1234 View Post
                              But definitely on the ground I can't stand him. He's very pushy and he doesn't listen when I tell him to move over or anything. My boss/trainer worked on thy last summer but apparently it didn't do any good.
                              This sounds like a handler problem, not a horse problem. Re-check the way you are treating this horse that you "hate", and see if you're being fair to him. If you're shoving him over and treating him unkindly, then you may get a pushy response.

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by In the Air View Post
                                If a working student of mine told me three times that they hated a horse they were assigned to ride they would find themselves with out anything to ride pretty quick. I would never assign them anything they could not ride, we don't keep dangerous animals but if it is on your ride list then your bottom needs to be in that saddle with a smile on your face.
                                I just had this situation with a working student. The horse she usually rides has an injury and is on stall rest. She was asked to ride a pony (the girl is small and light weight) in a lesson. She went home for supper and did not return for her lesson, because she did not want to ride the pony. I am beyond angry and amazed with the attitude. I just don"t get it.
                                www.tayvalleyfarm.com
                                My other home.

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Also on the pushy note...are you just leaning into him? My horse if you lean into him...he just leans right back.

                                  But if I poke him with my finger a few times in the side (maybe a swat to get his attention if he's totally tuning me out), he'll move over.

                                  My guy isn't normally pushy, but he is a big guy and without defined limits he definitely could be. I try to keep the boundaries clear and there's always that thought of, "you're going to listen to your handler, dangit". Sometimes that's reinforced with treats and pats when he's good. Sometimes it's reinforced with me backing him the heck up if he goes too far.

                                  So anyway, I don't know how you're handling this horse, but it might be, like hundredacres says, a handler problem. Some horses you can just ask politely for them to do things (like move over). Some horses you have to be more assertive with. (and I'm not talking about smacking the crap out of them with a whip or anything, to make that clear)
                                  The Trials and Jubilations of a Twenty-Something Re-rider
                                  Happy owner of Kieran the mostly-white-very-large-not-pony.

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    One more thing: I had another boarder, a teenager, who hated her horse - and the horse hated her. Once day I told her that the mare is worth her weight in gold and that I'd take her any day. My daughter was 6 years old then and she could ride her (even when she's just finished a bucking tantrum with her owner)...finally the owner grew up and realized it was HER not the horse, and she spent a few more years adoring the horse the way we did. I ended up buying her from her recently because the girl graduated from college, and she cried so hard putting her on the trailer. It's funny that this was the girl who hated that mare 6 years prior .

                                    I'm positive that if you hate a horse, you have some soul searching to do.

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      I can't say I've ever truly hated a horse. I've definitely been on ones who I don't consider "my" type of ride or have been less than pleasureable to be on but being put on those types of horses have made me a million times better of a rider.

                                      In your case, with the horse being kind of a pill on the ground and "awkward" to fences, I see that as a challenge to start to try and improve upon things! Maybe with some consistency or thinking outside of the box you can turn this guy into someone you (and others) enjoy handling, and riding.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        now I am confused. I thought it was your Boss. Trainer?? Both?
                                        You do work for your trainer but she gives you lessons and you pay for them on horses she chooses? Okay, Ride him, He sounds like an okay guy.
                                        Jumps funny? You know they all have a style, I used to ride a friends horse that practically wrenched my lower back everytime he jumped. And he was not an athletic horse, but he got the job done. Turned out me being better in the tack and more weight in my heels solved the problem. So see, You will always bring away something from every horse you sit on. You are cheating yourself by being picky. I could see if he reared or bucked or was a dirty stopper but that is not the case. What happens if you want to go to a working student position with a big name trainer, there may be horses you do not like You have to ride them. As they say, Git er done! You may surprise yourself.
                                        And maybe give him a carrot and be a little nicer to him on the ground. He is picking up your dislike of him.

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          You sound pretty young. If this horse is sane and athletic, he will have something to teach you. Stop griping and ride the horse. Learn what you can with him, and move on when your boss/trainer tells you too. Maybe if you focused on your ride more and the fact that you 'hate' him less, you'll understand.

                                          As a horse person, you are going to have times when you have to deal with a horse that you don't like. You can either handle it like a professional and ride what you have or you can act like a spoiled 12 year old, whine, complain, and throw a tempertantrum. Your choice. If he was unsafe, it'd be one thing... but he's not.

                                          Deal.

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X