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Can someone tell these idiots that horses can't choke?

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Alagirl View Post
    LOL,

    I mean not at your horse choking...

    but no. from where I am looking, feeding with bridle on is not done because you have to clean it later.


    but sheesh, the carriage people can't win. Give the horse a treat you are trying to kill it, give them nothing, you are starving them...

    the shrieking Nelly is still an idiot.

    Yes, horses can choke. How many do? one in a million? More? Less?
    It is not an everyday occurrence. bit in or no, probably a freak accident, like when I choke on my own saliva....because I am doing something stupid by accident.
    I'm afraid your inexperience with horses is showing. It's not a freak accident. Some horses are prone to choke. I would hope and expect that the carriage drivers would know if their horse was prone to choke and would prevent anyone from feeding anything that might cause choke.

    For example, the very senior, almost ancient pony boarder would never be given a carrot or apple. He's prone to choke and we're careful

    Comment


    • #22
      Horses can choke and no it doesn't block the airway but if it's not cleared it can cause pneumonia which can kill the horse. Choke is no fun and I've had a couple do it. I have the vet out immediately to tube them and remove the blockage. The last thing I want to worry about is aspiration in the lungs and then pneumonia. The two I had choke did it on feed.

      I do feed my horses treats with bits in and I let them eat grass with them in. But i do break the treats in small pieces.
      Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole

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      • #23
        I've seen my horses *choke* on a few things such as a big mouthful of pelleted food, or a few treats too many handed out by the kids. My TB mare seems especially prone to choke on dry pellets; not sure why but now we avoid them.

        So, I think it is certainly far more common than "one in a million" that a horse might choke. Whether there will be long-lasting or severe consequences are obviously less likely.

        All in all, I'd prefer no one feed my horses big carrots or whole apples, because I would like to avoid a choking situation...but in terms of it being a serious concern or case of *abuse* in the carriage horses...it's not really the same thing.

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        • #24
          ROFLMAO - I can so picture this!!
          My horse is about that tall as well - Moose - plain brown wrapper.

          Originally posted by wcporter View Post
          I wish someone would tell my horse that

          when we go out hacking in the summer, he likes to pretend he is a giraffe. At 17.3, he does a pretty good job at at it to.

          If you happened to be walking or riding through the trails/fields nearby, all you'll hear is me growling "No...no...noooo...no, a**hole...no corn stalks! Nooooooo! Stttooop it!"
          The problem with political jokes is that they get elected.
          H. Cate

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          • #25
            Not abuse to feed horses whole carrots or apples or any other such treat. Always heard the bit can interfere wit the horses ability to properly chew. Also have removed clumps of grass from bits, even from my old western grazing bits!

            That said...one of my favorited horses absolutely adored carrots. I fed him whole carrots, he would bite off pieces and munch away. Until the one day he chocked after taking too big of a bite and swallowed. After sitting on the horse's head while the vet pulled out the offending pieces, I vowed to always cut or break such treats into bite sized pieces.

            I am known as the crazy lady at barns because I "encourage" everyone to cut or break carrots/apples into smaller pieces. Once you have seen a horse struggling with choke, well you approach treats differently.
            "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
            Courtesy my cousin Tim

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            • #26
              Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
              I'm afraid your inexperience with horses is showing. It's not a freak accident. Some horses are prone to choke. I would hope and expect that the carriage drivers would know if their horse was prone to choke and would prevent anyone from feeding anything that might cause choke.

              For example, the very senior, almost ancient pony boarder would never be given a carrot or apple. He's prone to choke and we're careful

              Ok...prone to choke is far from accident.
              and I suppose after an episode or two, you can gauge it...
              until then?

              feed can make them choke (or have choke) so what do you propose?
              Not feeding?


              My 'lack of experience' Ah, right....my lack of horse ownership, gotcha....

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              • #27
                Originally posted by fooler View Post
                Once you have seen a horse struggling with choke, well you approach treats differently.
                Boy ain't this the truth! I've got one recovering from aspiration pneumonia following a choke right now. Man is it awful! She choked on grain, not a treat, but it was so terrible to watch and has been so expensive to treat that both of my horses now get soaked grain and broken up treats. Paranoid? Perhaps, but I can't afford a round two of this.

                That said...I agree that those carriage horses are far from being abused.

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                • #28
                  I've had a horse choke as well. It can be a serious problem and I would not feed carrots (or anything not disolveable like sugar) to a horse with a bridle on. That said, the article does seem like a bit of over reaction.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by Alagirl View Post
                    Ok...prone to choke is far from accident.
                    and I suppose after an episode or two, you can gauge it...
                    until then?
                    Well, there is always a first time for everything. I would not have thought my mare was *prone to choke* before feeding TC Lite Pellets to her, but when I did, she choked on them. It is rather disturbing to watch. So in her case, I avoid pellets entirely now, but I wouldn't assume that she is *prone* to choke on other things any more than my other horses. My other mare choked on 2 or 3 treats in one mouthful once, but not sure the treats are any more *dangerous* than a large piece of carrot or anything else. She just didn't chew it properly.

                    Originally posted by Alagirl View Post
                    feed can make them choke (or have choke) so what do you propose?
                    Not feeding?
                    They actually make special feed pans to discourage horses from bolting their feed, or people recommend putting rocks in their feed pan or large pieces of a salt block. As well as feeding them from a large, flat pan and not from a bucket or small pan where they can get a big ol' mouthful of grain. It's really not that uncommon.

                    Is it abuse, though, to feed carrots without chopping them up into little pieces. No, I wouldn't go that far - lord knows there are bigger neglect and abuse issues out there other than big carrot chunks. But I chop my apples and carrots in the house before I bring them out to the barn just in case.

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                    • #30
                      They don't asphyxiate, they aspirate. Mine did it on a handful of Dengie. Once it hit the lung, the allergenic reaction kicked in and he went into a reaction that included gurgling, swaying and falling down in the aisle. Two emergency vet visits, $400 in drugs and 13 days of injections later, he was back to his normal self. During the second vet visit, the vet relayed a story about a horse who swallowed a full carrot down into the lungs. The vet had to stand there for a half hour while the horse coughed it back up. I have no interest in repeating this experience again. Now they get fig newtons.
                      "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

                      http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/

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                      • #31
                        My DD's jr hunter had a serious choke, caused when the neighbors fed him an apple (repeated strong requests for them not to feed him anything fell on deaf ears - they were special). He swallowed it whole (he was a pig), and when his dinner was served, he ate all his pellets. Since they couldn't go down his throat, they backed up into his sinuses. My daughter went into his stall and found him in serious distress. The BO's husband was our vet, so he had immediate care. It took over 3 hours to clear the apple, and the vet said that the stall looked like a slaughterhouse from the blood from all the tubing. Then he developed a sinus infection (requiring radiographs, and nearly surgery) that smelled like a dead buffalo, necessitating a course of IV antibiotics.

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Originally posted by Alagirl View Post
                          Yes, horses can choke. How many do? one in a million? More? Less?
                          It is not an everyday occurrence. bit in or no, probably a freak accident, like when I choke on my own saliva....because I am doing something stupid by accident.
                          I've had all three of mine choke. It's scary as sh!t. My poor donk choked on soaked alfalfa cubes and both my mare and gelding choked on pelleted feed. Everybody now gets well soaked feed (well, the donk only gets a handful of dry oats but he's been good w/ them so far). Even so, though, my gelding choked on soaked alfalfa pellets that I was giving him as a snack. I guess he bolted them and took too big of a bite???

                          I think it must be like an esophageal spasm in people. I've only had one of those and, good lord, it was awful.
                          "Dogs are man's best friend. Cats are man's adorable little serial killer." -- theoatmeal.com

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                          • #33
                            If anyone wants to take a look, I responded to this (non) issue on our own FB page:

                            https://www.facebook.com/carriagehor...4&notif_t=like
                            VP Horse & Carriage Association of NYC

                            https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-F...ref=ts&fref=ts

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              ...and I'll post my response here, too, for those averse to clicking on links lol...but there are a lot of good responses on the thread over there, so clicking is better

                              A WORD ABOUT....CARROTS.

                              Yes, the anti-horse groups have (incredibly) found something NEW to complain about and to use to try to smear us: that we give our horses carrots during their working day while they have bits in their mouths.

                              NOW, I know that some of you horse folks out there would disagree with this, and will say you don't treat your horse while they have the bit in.

                              HOWEVER, NYC carriage horses work the way horses used to work -- that is, ALL DAY. 90% of our horses eat their grain throughout the day, carried on the carriage in a bucket. They also get lots of carrots throughout the day, especially after each ride. The carrots GREATLY enrich their day; gives them something to look forward to, keep them interested and animated as they interact with drivers and passengers, and they just taste good! Our horses are USED to this -- we don't pass judgment on others who DON'T feed with the bit in, or tell other people in other settings they SHOULD do it, so we don't like being told that we SHOULDN'T. Works for us.

                              That said, the way which we have found works best is to offer the carrot like a microphone, let the horse get a grip, and snap it off in half, then offer the other half. Occasionally the horse will take the whole carrot -- less than ideal, but we have never had a problem.

                              (Now, eating HAY with the bit in would not be something we would do, as it is easy for the hay to ball up around the bit or otherwise not go down the way it is supposed to.)

                              Just an FYI.
                              VP Horse & Carriage Association of NYC

                              https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-F...ref=ts&fref=ts

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Michaleenflynn, as I said before, I would assume the carriage driver would know if the horse was prone to choke and wouldn't allow it if he did.

                                I used to feed my guys whole carrots. Old Friends allows visitors to feed carrots. I don't think I would feed treats with a bit in the mouth, but clearly, you've not had a problem.

                                Most of us who are disputing the OP are disagreeing on the statement that horsesdon't choke or that only one in a million choke. Clearly that is not true.

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  There is "choke", the noun that we use to describe the condition, and there is to CHOKE, the verb, which horses can do when something obstructs the airway. Two different things that I think people think are the same (and saying that there is no obstruction in "choke" is accurate, but there can be an obstruction when a horse is CHOKING).

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by Kestrel View Post
                                    My DD's jr hunter had a serious choke, caused when the neighbors fed him an apple (repeated strong requests for them not to feed him anything fell on deaf ears - they were special). He swallowed it whole (he was a pig), and when his dinner was served, he ate all his pellets. Since they couldn't go down his throat, they backed up into his sinuses. My daughter went into his stall and found him in serious distress. The BO's husband was our vet, so he had immediate care. It took over 3 hours to clear the apple, and the vet said that the stall looked like a slaughterhouse from the blood from all the tubing. Then he developed a sinus infection (requiring radiographs, and nearly surgery) that smelled like a dead buffalo, necessitating a course of IV antibiotics.
                                    SO lucky you had the ability to get immediate treatment from your vet on this one. Wowza.
                                    "Aye God, Woodrow..."

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Errr... what kind of choking are we referring to if we aren't referring to choking?

                                      I'm just slightly confused.

                                      I knew a horse who ate half an apple- it got lodged in his windpipe and he couldn't breath. My riding instructor had to stick her hand down his throat and pull it out, she was fully past the elbow, and he's a nasty biter. So I think horses can choke?

                                      Not that this is particularly bad per say, and yeah, I was always taught to hold the base of a carrot and let the horse bite pieces of if you can't break it youself vs feeding a whole carrot. Honestly, the horses get a treat, the kids have some fun, it's likely not hurting anybody if the pieces are small.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        People have stated a couple of times that "choke" isn't an obstruction of the airway - because they are referring to the condition we call choke, that is an obstruction in the esophagus. But horses can absolutely choke by something blocking the airway! I'm blown away that people have replied that "choke is not an obstruction of the airway" type comment....ummm, yeah, but CHOKING is an obstruction, either way. Duh.

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