• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Seven Bald Eagles Near Death After Eating Dead Horses

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Seven Bald Eagles Near Death After Eating Dead Horses

    News video at the link. Appears the horses were euthanized but not properly disposed of. Since the eagles are a protected species, the horse owner could face jail time and fines.


    http://www.ksn.com/content/news/also...1OSxRx_5g.cspx
    "No matter how well you perform there's always somebody of intelligent opinion who thinks it's lousy." - Laurence Olivier

  • #2
    The story states:
    the eagles ate meat from two dead horses that had been euthanized with a strong poison called pentobarbital sodium. It appears, however, those horses had not been properly disposed of, and were left to rot where other animals could eat them.

    Full text:
    SEATTLE, Washington (KING) -- Sharon Thomas couldn't believe what she saw when she took a walk on her property near Winlock, Washington last Friday.

    "I got the binoculars, was unable to tell what it was,' she said. She found one of what turned out to be seven beautiful bald eagles all near death. "We didn't realize what the culprit was, why they were so sick," she said. "It was heart wrenching, wanting them to open their eyes and stay breathing so we could get them to the people who could help us."

    A worker with Raindancer Wild Bird Rescue in Olympia brought the eagles to West Sound Wildlife Center, where a team of 15 volunteers have been working on the birds for days. They were all in critical condition. Some of the eagles were vomiting and convulsing while the most critical were unconscious and unresponsive. The volunteer vets managed to save all of the birds at least for now.

    "It's miraculous that they're even here," said Dr. Alicia Bye.

    "Miraclulous" because the eagles had likely eaten enough poison to kill a horse.

    Workers at West Sound Wildlife Center believe the eagles ate meat from two dead horses that had been euthanized with a strong poison called pentobarbital sodium. It appears, however, those horses had not been properly disposed of, and were left to rot where other animals could eat them.

    Just a few more bites would've killed the eagles, said Dr. Bye, and other animals, as well. “All animals will scavenge. That includes your dog, my dog, cats and birds of prey.”

    Two of the birds remain in critical condition. One is still unable to stand. They are all quite young, just two or three years old. They don't even have the telltale white feathers on their heads yet.

    “What’s so sad is that this was completely avoidable,” said Mike Pratt, the Shelter’s director of wildlife services.

    Because bald eagles are a protected species, federal wildlife authorities are now investigating this case. If a horse owner is responsible for the birds getting sick he could face a year in jail and a $100,000 fine.

    Two of the birds are recovering well and could be released within the next 48 hours. Others, however, are given about a 50-50 chance of survival.

    “We could've lost them all,” said Sharon Thomas. “And who's to say how many more have been affected?”

    Comment


    • #3
      Interesting, I was unaware the eagles would eat carrion unless starving if at all. Any dead coyotes or other varmints that may have visited the buffet?
      When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

      The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Justa Bob View Post
        The story states:
        the eagles ate meat from two dead horses that had been euthanized with a strong poison called pentobarbital sodium. It appears, however, those horses had not been properly disposed of, and were left to rot where other animals could eat them.

        Full text:
        SEATTLE, Washington (KING) -- Sharon Thomas couldn't believe what she saw when she took a walk on her property near Winlock, Washington last Friday.

        "I got the binoculars, was unable to tell what it was,' she said. She found one of what turned out to be seven beautiful bald eagles all near death. "We didn't realize what the culprit was, why they were so sick," she said. "It was heart wrenching, wanting them to open their eyes and stay breathing so we could get them to the people who could help us."

        A worker with Raindancer Wild Bird Rescue in Olympia brought the eagles to West Sound Wildlife Center, where a team of 15 volunteers have been working on the birds for days. They were all in critical condition. Some of the eagles were vomiting and convulsing while the most critical were unconscious and unresponsive. The volunteer vets managed to save all of the birds at least for now.

        "It's miraculous that they're even here," said Dr. Alicia Bye.

        "Miraclulous" because the eagles had likely eaten enough poison to kill a horse.

        Workers at West Sound Wildlife Center believe the eagles ate meat from two dead horses that had been euthanized with a strong poison called pentobarbital sodium. It appears, however, those horses had not been properly disposed of, and were left to rot where other animals could eat them.

        Just a few more bites would've killed the eagles, said Dr. Bye, and other animals, as well. “All animals will scavenge. That includes your dog, my dog, cats and birds of prey.”

        Two of the birds remain in critical condition. One is still unable to stand. They are all quite young, just two or three years old. They don't even have the telltale white feathers on their heads yet.

        “What’s so sad is that this was completely avoidable,” said Mike Pratt, the Shelter’s director of wildlife services.

        Because bald eagles are a protected species, federal wildlife authorities are now investigating this case. If a horse owner is responsible for the birds getting sick he could face a year in jail and a $100,000 fine.

        Two of the birds are recovering well and could be released within the next 48 hours. Others, however, are given about a 50-50 chance of survival.

        “We could've lost them all,” said Sharon Thomas. “And who's to say how many more have been affected?”
        It is probably the highest charge they can throw at the people.
        aside from all the other environmental charges and sanitation.....

        good grief, how dumb can one be?!
        Originally posted by BigMama1
        Facts don't have versions. If they do, they are opinions
        GNU Terry Prachett

        Comment


        • #5
          Oh yeah, there is the responsible horse owner. Why the hell were they not picked up.
          I hope the heck they do fine the hell out of that owner.
          Praying for the rest of the magnificent birds!
          Cannot help but wonder if a Vet put the horses down. But most vets I think assume the horse owner will bury the animals or have them hauled away.

          Comment


          • #6
            the owner of the horses might face charges,

            what about the vet who contributed to this debacle

            As a Washington resident and a worker for the environment as my volunteer avocation this totally infuriates me.
            _\\]
            -- * > hoopoe
            Procrastinate NOW
            Introverted Since 1957

            Comment


            • #7
              Bald eagles are scavengers. The horses should have been buried; I'm surprised the vet didn't make sure of that.
              “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by hoopoe View Post
                the owner of the horses might face charges,

                what about the vet who contributed to this debacle

                As a Washington resident and a worker for the environment as my volunteer avocation this totally infuriates me.
                Originally posted by cowboymom View Post
                Bald eagles are scavengers. The horses should have been buried; I'm surprised the vet didn't make sure of that.
                Vets where you two live must be very different than any vet I have encountered. The vets job includes putting the animal down. Past that it is the owner's job. The vet does not hang out and make sure you have dug a hole or that the rendering company shows up three days later.

                It is crazy to blame the vet.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yo, chill. I said I was surprised that the vet didn't make sure. I didn't say blame the vet.

                  Where I live there are bajillions of bald eagles and coyotes and neighbor dogs running wild and it's extremely common knowledge that you don't leave out a carcass that was euthanized with pheno. HENCE, my SUPRISE.

                  The vets I worked for here took their horse carcasses to the dump where they were promptly bulldozed under ground so the flying rats couldn't eat them.
                  “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by hoopoe View Post
                    the owner of the horses might face charges,

                    what about the vet who contributed to this debacle

                    As a Washington resident and a worker for the environment as my volunteer avocation this totally infuriates me.
                    I just edited to wonder about that as you were posting.
                    I am giving the Vet the benefit of the doubt, but who knows.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It isn't a vet's responsibility to make sure the human disposes of the carcass correctly.
                      I will agree to a vet having the responsibility to tell the owner how to safely handle the remains and why, but not the vet having to ensure that was done.
                      And we all know not everyone will do what they've been told to do, even if it involves safety. And especially if it involves extra work or cash.

                      And when they find this owner...I hope to hell they form a line for people to slap the crap out of them. Hard.
                      As horrible as it is for those poor, nationally protected birds...tons of people taking the easy way out of remains disposal on ANY animal filled with deadly chemicals don't realize just how far that reaches.
                      Even the insects from the carcass will pass the poison along, enough to kill the next animal despite the small amount. And it's a s-l-o-w horrible death when ingested in small amounts.
                      And worse when it's a predator/scavenger that will then die and pass it along to the next which will die and pass it along to the next....
                      A single *cat* not wrapped and buried deep enough away from water (above and underground) can cause a chain reaction in an ecosystem and almost completely unbalance it in a dangerous way.

                      Those eagles...one bite would have killed them. It's not an issue of "one more bite and they'd be dead"...they mean "one more bite and we couldn't have saved them." But a single bite, without intervension by humans, would have killed the birds. Hope like hell they've located the equine remains and made them safe. And that they find that owner! WTF??? Dumbass!

                      Don't mean to get frothy...but damn people...this is why so many of us constantly lecture about proper euthanasia and more importantly...disposal! So the few that will do the whole "rolly eyes, you're overreacting" shitck and think they can bury any chemical-filled remains anywhere and anyway they want...please reconsider!!!!!
                      You jump in the saddle,
                      Hold onto the bridle!
                      Jump in the line!
                      ...Belefonte

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        http://www.in.gov/boah/files/AVMA_Eu...Guidelines.pdf

                        page 16 and 17

                        re the first paragraph, the vet is, in part responsible
                        _\\]
                        -- * > hoopoe
                        Procrastinate NOW
                        Introverted Since 1957

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          NOBODY IS BLAMING THE VET. well, *I* wasn't blaming the vet, I said I was surprised. But maybe the vet IS to blame!

                          I just think most vets would make it clear that you can't just leave the carcass out. And maybe this vet did and the land owner totally ignored.

                          From:http://www.in.gov/boah/files/AVMA_Eu...Guidelines.pdf

                          ""Serious repercussions
                          may occur when veterinary health professionals who
                          should be well-informed about the necessity for proper
                          disposal of animal remains fail to provide it, or fail to
                          inform their clients how to provide it, whether there
                          was intent to cause harm or not.138,139 C""

                          Winlock, WA ordinance says the land/animal owner is responsible for the disposal.

                          http://www.winlockwa.govoffice2.com/...47BE013%7D.PDF
                          Last edited by cowboymom; Mar. 26, 2013, 01:48 PM.
                          “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by hoopoe View Post
                            http://www.in.gov/boah/files/AVMA_Eu...Guidelines.pdf

                            page 16 and 17

                            re the first paragraph, the vet is, in part responsible
                            I do not see how that says the vet is responsible for an idiot who does not follow thru.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              No one established that the vet made effort to inform the owner

                              until then, vet is , in part responsible. I wonder if the juornalist will follow through. Given the journalism standards of the common day media in the immediate area, I will wait for "the stranger" to follow through.

                              The vet knew that the property contained a large load of toxin, follow through would appear to be the prudent thing.
                              _\\]
                              -- * > hoopoe
                              Procrastinate NOW
                              Introverted Since 1957

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by hoopoe View Post
                                what about the vet who contributed to this debacle
                                the vet would not be responsible for disposal of the carcass(es).

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by hoopoe View Post
                                  No one established that the vet made effort to inform the owner
                                  I do not think we have even established a hint of who owned the horses so making the leap that the vet did anything wrong is pretty darn huge.

                                  I see you want to blame the vet, so continue on doing so. God forbid the horse owner be responsible for their own critters or anything. Clearly it has to be the fault of someone else.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Umm... sounds like you have an ax to grind. You're leaping to conclusions worse than anyone else on this thread.
                                    “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Chances are that the carcass is still poisoning wildlife.

                                      Which means there are other suffering animals out there, who will probably die unnoticed.

                                      Disposal of large animal mortalities is becoming increasingly regulated; and in some parts of the US you CANNOT dispose of a mortality on site.

                                      Horse owners need to get up to speed on this subject, because our horses will die someday. Often that death is unplanned. We all need to know who to contact for disposal, we need to know the laws and regs in our state and locality, and we need to know all that now. Not when we're holding the lead line and weeping because our horse is about to die.

                                      Vets can help educate horse owners about disposal, but the owner has to have a good plan in place before the worst happens.

                                      A euthanized animal (pet or livestock) is nothing but poison. Lethal poison that can contaminate groundwater and kill pets and wildlife that come into contact with it. By the time you find the poisoned animal - it's often too late to save him.

                                      I hope the Eagles recover, and I fervently hope that contaminated carcass has since been disposed of properly.
                                      Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                                      Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                                      -Rudyard Kipling

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Bald eagles are opportunistic scavengers -- in fact, I've always thought it quite amusing that they became our national bird as they prefer to either (a) eat trash or (b) beat up other birds and take their food. Oh, biological irony...

                                        They are a protected species but are definitely very numerous both in the Pacific NW and down here in our river corridors. Heck, we have a pair living in the backyard of the office here in town, LOL. So it is unlikely that the owner will receive the highest penalty available. Not that it is ok to harm wildlife just because they are not critically endangered -- it is never ok to harm ANY native wildlife through negligence or otherwise.

                                        The owner will not be eligible for federal prosecution by USFWS unless they knowingly harmed the birds. If you harm protected species by accident and you report it, you will not get in trouble. However, since it sounds like the neighbour reported it, the owner may get a hand slap, although I rather doubt it as it can take some doing to get that particular agency to bring forward meaningful charges, especially in small scale case like this.

                                        It is extremely irresponsible to not properly dispose of the euthanized body and that they definitely should see additional repercussions for. Leaving out a poisoned corpse is wrong in many, many ways.
                                        Life doesn't have perfect footing.

                                        Bloggily entertain yourself with our adventures (and disasters):
                                        We Are Flying Solo

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X