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A cribber for a 1st horse - would this be a huge no-no for you?

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Zu Zu View Post

    I will
    NEVER purchase a 'cribber' .
    You just sealed you fate.
    You KNOW what habit the next horse you fall head over heels in love with will do.
    A pussycat of a horse with a chewed off tail won the triple crown, The Cubs won the world series and Trump won the Presidency.
    Don't tell me 'It can't be done.'

    Comment


    • #22
      No. A 12 yr old child does not need a cribber. An experienced adult who knows what she is getting into, can handle a cribber.

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by WildandWickedWarmbloods View Post
        No. A 12 yr old child does not need a cribber. An experienced adult who knows what she is getting into, can handle a cribber.
        I don't understand this remark. How do you need to be an adult to "handle" a cribber? I handle my cribber like any other horse. The only difference is that I put a cribbing collar on him.
        Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
        EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by Bogie View Post
          I don't understand this remark. How do you need to be an adult to "handle" a cribber? I handle my cribber like any other horse. The only difference is that I put a cribbing collar on him.
          Yeah. I'm a little confused by that comment, too.

          I don't even put a strap on my horse. I just keep her outside. I can't even recall the last time I saw her crib.

          It's not like we're talking about a rearer or a dirty stopper or something dangerous. It's just a cribber

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          • #25
            Originally posted by WildandWickedWarmbloods View Post
            No. A 12 yr old child does not need a cribber. An experienced adult who knows what she is getting into, can handle a cribber.
            HUH? What exactly do you mean? Why can only an experienced adult handle a cribber?? Are you saying the horse will try to crib on the 12 yr old? I am confused, lol.

            If the horse is suitable in every other way, why would a cribber change that? I understand that some people would rather not have one, but really, only an adult can handle one? WHAT?!?
            Riding is NOT meant as an inside sport, GET out of that arena!!!

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            • #26
              I have had two cribbers. Cribbing has a wide spectrum. Hero doesn't crib often, just after eating and will go out and graze no issues. Matt would rather crib than eat, would rather be in the stall than graze and would crib through any collar.

              So it depends. Some cribbers can be managed. Some are very high maintenance and takes a full understanding of what it entails.

              But I don't think cribbing is a deal breaker for me with the right horse.
              Grab mane and kick on!

              http://www.ashleykriegeleventing.com/

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              • #27
                Many, many horses out there to choose from ~ I will NOT choose a 'cribber'

                Many, many horses to chose from ~ I have NOT & will NOT choose a 'cribber' ~

                * I keep mine for life ~ from show to retired life *

                Have ten currently ~ enough to keep me busy

                Originally posted by 5 View Post
                You just sealed you fate.
                You KNOW what habit the next horse you fall head over heels in love with will do.
                Zu Zu Bailey " IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE ! "

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                • #28
                  The only problem I foresee with a newbie mom/teenager combo owning a cribber for their first horse is having to constantly field ignorant comments like the one below:

                  Originally posted by WildandWickedWarmbloods View Post
                  No. A 12 yr old child does not need a cribber. An experienced adult who knows what she is getting into, can handle a cribber.


                  People have all sorts of misconceptions and stereotypes when it comes to cribbers. It would be helpful to give your friend the facts about cribbing up front so she and her daughter are prepared for the onslaught of disproven old wives tales they are going to be bombarded with down the road.
                  Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO

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                  • #29
                    it wouldn't be a deal breaker for me, I've had several cribbers and several actual wood eaters - chewed the wood, not cribbed. We fixed the problem for the chewers by painting the fences/wood surfaces with used motor oil (they don't like the smell or taste, although after a while when it soaks in it stops being as effective. It also helped IMMENSELY when we put the major cribber 24/7 on a round bale with a slow feed net around it....he can nibble all day and does, and no longer cribs at ALL outside, and very rarely when he's inside. he does have a collar on and that helps.
                    Teaching Horseback Riding Lessons: A Practical Training Manual for Instructors

                    Stop Wasting Hay and Extend Consumption Time With Round Bale Hay Nets!!

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                    • #30
                      I owned a cribber. He was a good horse, a steady trail horse and pretty too. I won quite a few halter classes with him. His habit was easily managed. I ended up selling him to a family looking for their first horse and they had many happy years together.

                      I would not hesitate to buy another cribber, if I liked the horse. You can usually get them cheaper too, since people are so silly about the habit.

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                      • #31
                        Originally posted by gaitedincali View Post
                        I owned a cribber. He was a good horse, a steady trail horse and pretty too. I won quite a few halter classes with him. His habit was easily managed. I ended up selling him to a family looking for their first horse and they had many happy years together.

                        I would not hesitate to buy another cribber, if I liked the horse. You can usually get them cheaper too, since people are so silly about the habit.
                        I don't consider disliking cribbers silly at all.

                        If you are in a stable with many horses, some may crib or stall walk or weave all day long, not eating properly for doing their thing and you manage.

                        If you have a few handpicked horses in your own stable you care for and live with all day, then one such horse becomes a much larger annoyance.
                        I don't care if a horse, a good or not so good horse is a cribber in someone else's care, just would not buy one for my barn.

                        Some private barns only want geldings, others mares, some quarter horses, others have arabians, each one of us has our preferences.
                        When it comes to horses with OCD problems, well, some of us also have our very strong preferences.

                        That is not "silly", it is called "preference".

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                        • #32
                          I have had three cribbers. It doesn't bother me if controlled by a collar. I am only using t posts as I put up new fence instead of wood so I will have less potential for damage.

                          The only reason I hesitate is for resale but if I wanted the horse for me, no qualms. Plenty of horses do much more annoying things although when they chewed on my wood posts I was pissed of course. Collars went on and problem solved. I don't consider them inhumane.

                          If the horse is the right one, especially for a young girl, I would overlook most vices that were not dangerous to the handler and rider. No horse is perfect.

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                          • #33
                            Totally agree with 'never say never' when you're talking about your OWN horse.
                            I thought the thread began in re: should OP have any concerns in promoting/suggesting these first time buyers purchase this cribbing horse for their 12 yr. old. Then, the thread progressed to explaining that yes, they would be horse keeping on their property as well.
                            To me? that leaves the OP in the position of: not only suggesting the horse on the animial's under saddle merits, but also taking responsibility for: recommending a horse for home horse keeping to basic 'newcomers' to owning a horse as well as keeping it at home, as well as : for their beloved 12 yr old (who lets face it: will move on, either to another horse, or to other interests in life) Either way, all those details play into : should she endorse a 16 yr old cribber.
                            some issues have to do with: the horse being re homed. some issues have to do with : the property owners understanding the special needs in terms of property. Some issues have to do with the young horse owner and her parents being well versed in this type of habit horse care.
                            Lots to consider that doesn't really fall under: Oh, but I've owned a cribber and I was fine with it.
                            just sayin.
                            ayrabz
                            "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
                            --Jimmy Buffett

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              [QUOTE=Zu Zu;6848599]Many, many horses to chose from ~ I have NOT & will NOT choose a 'cribber' ~ [/QUOTE ]


                              Who knows what the future holds...

                              Sometimes horses choose you...You may be Doomed. (Insert scary music)

                              You said the fateful words "I will never buy X"


                              X= A breed, a color, a sex, a vice.... you get the idea.
                              A pussycat of a horse with a chewed off tail won the triple crown, The Cubs won the world series and Trump won the Presidency.
                              Don't tell me 'It can't be done.'

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Cribbing does irritate some people, but research that I have read indicates that it releases endorphins in the horse. There also may be an ulcer component. (the) Bottom line is, I have a cribber, and she is priceless to me because she is sane, comfortable to ride, does not do anything violent and reciprocates my affection. (Horsey hugs are great!)
                                I am in my sixth decade, hoping still to be riding for many years to come. For me, and for a child, a horse that is safe and sane is a much more important factor than whether or not the animal cribs. I do not put a collar on my mare because she also had a very bad choke episode July 2011 and Vet advised not to constrict her throat in any way. Fortunately, the stable at which I board her even has a stall just for cribbers, with the only really cribbable surface being covered with a sturdy strip of metal. She also gets daily turnout, and that helps, IMO.
                                Jeanie
                                RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.

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                                • #36
                                  Another vote for not passing on the horse just because it cribs. My first horse cribbed-he's now my sister's horse, and at 20 years young is still competing.

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by equinelerium View Post
                                    Another vote for not passing on the horse just because it cribs. My first horse cribbed-he's now my sister's horse, and at 20 years young is still competing.
                                    I don't think the question was if a cribber can be a competition horse or not?
                                    I don't think anyone is saying we need to shoot cribbers, they are no good?

                                    The question was, "is a cribber a good first horse?"

                                    That also I don't think is relevant, if a cribber is a first or last horse.

                                    What others like myself have tried to bring to this conversation is that a cribber is a horse with certain management problems and for some of us, an irritant in our barns and pastures cribbing.
                                    That managing is a problem with some cribbers.

                                    Now, is this horse suitable for the kid? Seems like it is.
                                    Being a cribber, what else should we consider before buying a cribber?

                                    I think that Ayrabz has summarized well in post #33 what concerns are relevant to this situation that the horse is a cribber.
                                    One salient one, no matter what the horse is, who it is for, being a cribber is not important.
                                    What is important here is that the new owner doesn't mind that OCD problem and it's management and that such may affect it's later resale.

                                    There definitely are no perfect horses and if a horse fit, but is a cribber and cribbing is not a concern for some, they should buy them.

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      We have used the Miracle Collar with success if it is kept tight enough. Some say its a learned behavior some say its not. I think its both. I have seen other horses start cribbing by being near a cribber and I have seen no horses start cribbing being near a cribber. So, go figure!

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        I think it is so hard to find the right horse, one that is safe, sound, and jumps for a 12 y.o., that I wouldn't hesitate to buy a cribber. I have had one for years. At first I was utterly horrified, and now I don't pay any attention to it. I kept a collar on her for awhile but I really thought it inhumane and took it off. She cribs when fed grain or treats, but otherwise doesn't. She has always maintained her weight, her teeth are fine, and so is her health. I do have the advantage of having my own place and she doesn't have to live in a stall.
                                        Mystic Owl Sporthorses
                                        www.mysticowlsporthorses.com

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                                        • #40
                                          If the horse is suitable in every other way, the cribbing shouldn't necessarily be that off-putting. For a first horse, you want sane, safe, and well-trained. It sounds like this horse is that--I'd say go for it.

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