• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Teaching emergency dismount..

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Teaching emergency dismount..

    Is this even done anymore? In this litigious day, I've been told explicitly NOT to teach it for fear of lawsuit.

    Help an old woman out.. how did you go about teaching emergency dismount? Did you have any special requirements? Size of pony? Did the kids have to be bareback? Different instructions between gaits?

    After reading the 'fearful child' thread, it got me thinking..

  • #2
    I put my kids on the lunge line, bareback. We begin at the walk, then trot. I do not do it at the canter. I have seen several of my students use it with success although I may not do the final step they are able to land safely.

    Comment


    • #3
      Dito, at the walk then the trot. Kick both feet out of stirrups, grab mane and swing off.

      At summer camp I use it as a relay race, I make a haystring "target" and they get a point for each foot that lands in the circle as they ride by and dismount (no penalty for landing feet first and then butt landing ).
      Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
      Bernard M. Baruch

      Comment


      • #4
        with emergency dismount, or learning to fall, I wouldn't use the careful or babysitter type horse to have someone do it at a walk. I remember a long time ago, I learned to fall/emergency dismount well the pony I was on was fairly old and I'm guessing one of these careful types. Well when I tried quickly getting off when she was walking, she stopped when I started dismounting quickly. However at a trot or faster speed I was able to practice without her stopping.

        This was likely because she was unable to stop immediately.

        of course after I got off she stopped very soon after, so I practiced on a different pony who wasn't so careful/baby sitter type. I learned to fall and roll away quickly.

        Comment


        • #5
          Same here, usually included in first lesson, and done progressively harder from starting @ standing still, in both directions & various footings. Along w/ around-the world, touch ears, tail, etc... all the older stuff.

          Comment


          • #6
            Just a thought of something to include in your program, but learning how to fall in a controlled tumble has been a LOT more useful *for me* at preventing serious injury. That's all stuff that can be done without a horse, on gym mats--from somersaults to forward tumbles at the run. Martial arts schools are particularly good at teaching how to safely dissipate the shock of landing.
            ---------------------------

            Comment


            • #7
              Regarding your question as to whether it is still taught...yes, it is taught in pony club. All the kids learn it very early on, it is part of their testing.
              Lori T
              www.calypsofarmeventers.blogspot.com
              www.facebook.com/LoriTankelPhotography
              www.facebook.com/LTEquine for product updates on the lines I rep

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes! I was taught the ED as a kid 30+ years ago and have been thankful many times for it. There are going to be times when you are going to hit the ground, and I truly believe it's always better to do it on your own terms

                Glad to hear PC still teaches it. IMHO learning to fall properly is a lot less dangerous than never learning it at all.
                "I'm not strange, weird, off, nor crazy. My reality is just different from yours."
                ~Lewis Carroll

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by WildBlue View Post
                  Just a thought of something to include in your program, but learning how to fall in a controlled tumble has been a LOT more useful *for me* at preventing serious injury. That's all stuff that can be done without a horse, on gym mats--from somersaults to forward tumbles at the run. Martial arts schools are particularly good at teaching how to safely dissipate the shock of landing.
                  Ice skating lessons will do a great job of teaching how to fall too.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As a kid, I wasn't taught the emergency dismount. I was taught to keep the horse between your legs. Worked out really well.

                    It wasn't until I was nearly 30 and had started riding English and learned of this emergency dismount that I ever tried it. And I ended up with a Barbaro-esque fracture, plates and screws. I tucked and rolled but held onto the reins so when the horse regained his legs (thought he was going to roll over on top of me) he yanked my right arm out and I landed it on it. Snap, crackle and pop.

                    I think that if I were in a position of liability/teaching, I'd TALK about tuck and roll and all that, but I'm not sure I'd practice it a whole lot. Instead, I think I'd be inclined to take things at a pace where the kiddo was learning balance and timing and hope that we weren't getting dumped on any kind of regular basis.

                    I've come off a horse a handful of times in my 30 odd years. But only once was it a voluntary launch/tuck and roll and it resulted in a rather large hospital bill and loss of use of my hand in a lot of ways.
                    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

                    Might be a reason, never an excuse...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Safely done, off a small, quiet pony

                      it's a great tool.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I don't see the use of it. If a horse is under control enough that I can safely swing off, land on my feet, and whoa with the reins level with my ears then chances are good that I should just stay on. The only other times I've come off have been unplanned and as the result of a bolt or bad spook/buck. In those instances I want to land as far away from the horse as possible.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by GraceLikeRain View Post
                          I don't see the use of it. .
                          I have always seen the teaching of an emergency dismount as a power tool for the kid. They practice doing it, are comfortable doing it, know where all their body parts are SUPPOSED to go as they exit the animal. I find kid is then COMFORTABLE with horse who acts up a bit, because kid can LEAVE IF THEY CHOOSE, to get out of a problem situation.

                          Advantage to me is that kids SELDOM dismount from being scared, they have confidence to work out the problem with horse instead.

                          I have seen a couple times when kid SHOULD have done an emergency dismount, but they didn't know how. Horse was running away in the ARENA, jumped the exit gate and lost kid, who did get hurt. Not my kid, not my 4-H Club, so I didn't bring it up to anyone. My kids did know how to do their emergency dismounts safely, even from the tall horse. We did a lot of practice on that, haven't ever needed it to save themselves with, THANK GOODNESS!

                          I think it should be taught, kid is skilled at doing it, though they may never need it.

                          I had to lead the old horse my kids learned on, she would stop when kids went off balance or got wobbly. So leading her kept her in motion for the various speeds we needed to practice with. Funny, because she never stopped moving as they hung off one side to pickup or drop things galloping in Gymkahna games. Great old horse.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I was never taught the emergency dismount; I think it just teaches people to bail instead of trying to stay on top. I have seen people get pretty hurt trying to bail out when they may have been able to stick... I'm one who doesn't give up and I have managed to stay in the saddle way past the point where I thought I would surely hit the ground. In a bad situation, I will only dismount if I can get the horse stopped completely.
                            Jigga:
                            Why must you chastise my brilliant idea with facts and logic? **picks up toys (and wine) and goes home**

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by WildBlue View Post
                              Just a thought of something to include in your program, but learning how to fall in a controlled tumble has been a LOT more useful *for me* at preventing serious injury. That's all stuff that can be done without a horse, on gym mats--from somersaults to forward tumbles at the run. Martial arts schools are particularly good at teaching how to safely dissipate the shock of landing.
                              well, yeah, to got splat in a controlled way...however, the idea of getting off the horse in this manner is not to go splat and lay there, but to keep on rolling, so hopefully the horse won't land on top of you....
                              Originally posted by BigMama1
                              Facts don't have versions. If they do, they are opinions
                              GNU Terry Prachett

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
                                Ice skating lessons will do a great job of teaching how to fall too.
                                I actually have never really "taught" falling in skating, as I find if you're really skating, you don't have time to think about it. There's more time spent on how to stand up. (The hardest thing to teach people, ESPECIALLY adults, is go fast, because it will hurt a lot less when you fall as you'll skid instead of just slam straight down. The most dangerous people on any rink are people going slowly because they don't know what they're doing and when they go down, they get tangled up. Saw someone open up their head at the ND rink last week that way.) You just try to remember not to put your hands out. I found falling off horses worked better for skating than the reverse as I'd somewhere developed the roll instinct.

                                Good comparison though is there are falls you cannot save. I took out my ice dance coach and myself because I jabbed a toepick and there was absolutely no way to keep us from going over backwards. The times I've actually come off a horse, I was coming off, and not in a way I could really control the landing (except a few lucky rolls forward over the shoulder.) Usually I ended up flat on my back or side, and once on my feet hanging on the rail with my trainer yelling how I was lucky it was rubber fencing or I'd have broken both my arms. (Well, it was put out my arms or slam into the fence with my chest...I'd have taken broken arms.)

                                And honestly, in most of those situations, I really should NOT have fallen off--the falls over fences, I shouldn't have been jumping but the trainer didn't care (her goal was show students and I didn't know enough to say no, being 12), the other times were massive bolts or spooks I should have ridden out. The few times I've had bucking, I've stayed on. As BuddyRoo says, I'd rather keep the horse between my legs, and the one time I can see jumping (a rearer) I'm not sure jumping off a moving horse is at all comparable.
                                Author Page
                                Like Omens In the Night on Facebook
                                Steampunk Sweethearts

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I don't remember ever being specifically taught it during horseback riding lessons. Not in a structured way. My father had taught me how to do it when falling off my bike/skates (tuck and roll) so I already had a habit of it. Plus the horse I rode for my first years of lessons spooked at everything so... I kinda learned how to apply it to horses on the go as there was no way I was able to sit his sideways leaps into the air at that point.

                                  During college we had it sometimes where at the end while walking our trainer would have us dismount suddenly. But it was rather pointless as the horses all stopped for the most part as soon as they felt you shift to dismount.
                                  Telling a worrier to relax is counterproductive. Then we worry about relaxing.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I learned it, and I taught it to my kids- they think it is great fun. I used it once- on a bolting pony who wouldn't turn or stop for anything. She was headed back to the barn at a flat out gallop, and i figured id rather land in the snowbank now rather than the concrete floor later- worked great-did the penguin slide for 15 feet and hopped up unhurt
                                    ~Former Pet Store Manager (10yrs)
                                    ~Vintage Toy Dealer (rememberswhen.us)
                                    ~Vet Tech Student
                                    Mom to : 1 Horse, 4 Dogs, 3 Cats

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      This bring back memories! I was taught how to emergency dismount at western dude ranch camp when I was a kid. Feet out of the stirrups, let go of the reins, swing legs and vault off. If a counselor yelled, "SQUIRREL!" we were all to do an emergency dismount. It was I think more of a tool for the counselors to get all the kids off the horses/ponies immediatly when they thought the collective situation was going south and they didn't want anyone bolted off with.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Renae View Post
                                        This bring back memories! I was taught how to emergency dismount at western dude ranch camp when I was a kid. Feet out of the stirrups, let go of the reins, swing legs and vault off. If a counselor yelled, "SQUIRREL!" we were all to do an emergency dismount. It was I think more of a tool for the counselors to get all the kids off the horses/ponies immediatly when they thought the collective situation was going south and they didn't want anyone bolted off with.
                                        I'm just trying to picture this... does this mean all the kids jumped off and the horses just kept going, since you say everyone let go of the reins? No attempt to stop the horse first?
                                        Jigga:
                                        Why must you chastise my brilliant idea with facts and logic? **picks up toys (and wine) and goes home**

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X