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How do I get my parents to understand?

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  • #21
    Jessica,

    Working with horses is a totally valid career goal. There are loads of people who make a living in the horse-related industries. So why not you?

    Your parents are being parents. They're worried about you because you're talking about venturing into a world that is unknown to them. We are all always more comfortable with familiar worlds and familiar roles. If your parents were happy, successful flamenco dancers, they'd be freaking out if you told them you wanted to work for a bank.

    If there is someone out there doing it, it can be done. I'm a writer and made a nice career for myself. I started out with no money or connections or safety net. My SO is a music composer. Many of our friends work successfully in fields that parents are forever telling their children they *can't* and *won't* succeed in.

    However, you have to be realistic about setting and working toward your goals. You also should be prepared to recalibrate and/or redirect if you find you're more interested in or better suited to something else.

    Health insurance costs $120/month for someone your age. Join your state farm bureau and buy your insurance from them. It's that simple.

    Your plan sounds fine to me. It's much better than anything I had in mind when I was your age. If your parents don't like it, don't get into those discussions with them. Quietly change the subject, or talk instead about what you want to study at college. If it's become a family argument flashpoint, it's probably better to leave it alone for now. It's your future, and you don't have to share it with them. There are so many other things you can talk about with your family.

    But if your parents don't like your plan, then you will have to be prepared to support yourself. This means responsibility, but it really isn't all that hard to take care of yourself and pay your own way. You might not get the WS position with Boyd Martin but you'll find something somewhere else. Or you'll be like me and do all kinds of odd jobs -- some of mine were very odd -- to get by.

    In the meantime, make contacts in the horse community and pick lots of brains about what people do, how they came to do it, and why they like/dislike it. That should help get you thinking about your own future, and how you see yourself in it.

    Good luck. Have fun. You'll get there, wherever it may be.

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    • #22
      Brillant, JER.
      Click here before you buy.

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      • Original Poster

        #23
        Thanks so much to everyone who is commenting. I am reading these posts, and my thoughts are swarming my mind. Whenever I even try and consider a "real" job outside of horses, I feel my heart sink. I get panicked. I feel like I want to be with horses, riding horses, and competing all the time. At least, my 17 year old self tells me that. But then I jump into my "almost adult" self and think, "What if my passion DOES burn out? Will this have all been for nothing?". It's a scary thought. If I do decide to go all the way with this, I think I will be able to get my parents on my side. I just have to be mature, responsible, talk with them about my plan, go to college, and show them that I can do this. Before I do anything crazy, I will definatley become a working student for some local trainers this summer, if I can, and some out-of-state trainers too, before college possibly. I need to be realistic and make sure that I love this enough to work everyday at it. And work hard. I'm not going to do this half-heartedly. It's all or nothing, if I want to make it anywhere, not to mention to the top of the sport. So thank you all for being supportive and HONEST. You are making me think.

        -Jessica

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        • Original Poster

          #24
          Thanks so much to everyone who is commenting. I am reading these posts, and my thoughts are swarming my mind. Whenever I even try and consider a "real" job outside of horses, I feel my heart sink. I get panicked. I feel like I want to be with horses, riding horses, and competing all the time. At least, my 17 year old self tells me that. But then I jump into my "almost adult" self and think, "What if my passion DOES burn out? Will this have all been for nothing?". It's a scary thought. If I do decide to go all the way with this, I think I will be able to get my parents on my side. I just have to be mature, responsible, talk with them about my plan, go to college, and show them that I can do this. Before I do anything crazy, I will definatley become a working student for some local trainers this summer, if I can, and some out-of-state trainers too, before college possibly. I need to be realistic and make sure that I love this enough to work everyday at it. And work hard. I'm not going to do this half-heartedly. It's all or nothing, if I want to make it anywhere, not to mention to the top of the sport. So thank you all for being supportive and HONEST. You are making me think.

          -Jessica

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by Horserider15 View Post
            I am a 17 year old girl named Jessica. I am a junior in high school and will be graduating next year. I have a loving family and very loving, but protective, parents who just want the best for me. I take my riding seriously, and I really want to work in the industry as a career. You know, do anything I can for good people, become a working student, work as a groom, anything! And whenever I try and talk to my parents, they just don't take me seriously. My mom worries about how in the world I will get any health benefits without a "real" job. I am planning on going to college to get a business degree as well as an English degree so that I can support myself outside of the industry if I need too. I do think that that is important for anybody. I know that I am taking a risk with what I plan to do with my life, but is there any way that I can get my family to understand? Also, how do riders/grooms/trainers out there get any "benefits" for health care or anything? Please give me any advice you have, thank you!
            -Jessica
            Great, smart questions.

            You aren't going to like the answer, and neither will your parents.

            The reality is that very, very few professionals in the equestrian industry have health or retirement benefits.

            I know so many - too many - hardworking, talented people who teach and train... and struggle to keep their boarding/training businesses going. They just can't afford to buy health insurance. According to US News, the average individual premium for a healthy young adult is close to $300 a month- and many people pay a LOT more. And retirement saving is an entirely different, and very important issue.

            I think you are wise to go to college, and prepare yourself for a career. Most of the pros I know did something else "to pay the rent" while they got themselves established. Remember also that there are many jobs in the industry that offer benefits as well as the opportunity to be around horses. Think of all the businesses that serve horse people - tack companies, feed companies, firms that make all the supplements, medications, and equipment used by riders. Look around a barn at all the "stuff" and you you will find dozens of companies that offer jobs connected to horses - and benefits.
            **********
            We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
            -PaulaEdwina

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            • #26
              Your 17-year-old self is going to tell you all manner of nonsense before you're done being 17. And then your 18-year-old self will take it from there. Don't sweat it--it's perfectly OK to not have a crystal clear vision of your future at that age! Just keep yourself on the right track, invest in your education, stay healthy, get out and live your life, and don't make the mistake of thinking that a happy life can only come about by one specific set of circumstances.
              Click here before you buy.

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              • #27
                all good points here and you might want to think a little outside the box in a horse career - it's hard to be a top level rider/trainer where you can make a decent living but there are options. For example some private schools w/ riding programs or larger lesson stables might offer a benefits plan. There might be other careers where you be involved w/ horses in another capacity such as vet tech, massage or acupuncture, sales rep for various products - tack apparel, feed etc..

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                • #28
                  OP--You are 17....you have so much ahead of you. At your age...I wanted to ride. I went to college and STILL didn't know what I wanted to do. I took 2 years off to just do the horse thing. I lived all over the place, and learned a ton. I personally decided to do something other than horses as I was getting physically hurt and knew I had no safety net and was soon going to have to be financially supporting one of my parents. That was my situation...yours may be different.

                  You are just at the beginning....who knows what life will be but I can tell you one thing...at this point, you don't even know what you don't know. Your dream job could be in horses or something you currently know nothing about

                  Taking your time before or after school is just fine, spending some time in the horse world is fine too. When you do go to school...take "different" courses. I knew nothing about Astronomy or Geology until I took some filler classes my last year of college....had I taken them my first year...I would have had a different major!
                  ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    May I coach you for a second? I felt very similar at your age, and I think if someone had correctly helped me explore those feelings earlier in life I could have gotten to my happy medium much quicker.

                    So, think about everything you love about the horse industry. The daily duties, the goals, the interactions, etc. now, narrow down what key components of it seem to bring out the biggest smile. Is it teaching and seeing a person experience a correct movement? Is it delivering a foal you've bred? Is it retraining ottbs into successful careers and watching them go into happy homes? The sweat in your brow and the ache in your muscles after mucking stalls? (You get the idea)
                    Next, look at each of those individually and ask yourself why you like them so much? What does it do for you?


                    Now, remove horses and think about where you can recreate those feelings.

                    I know that's probably bringing up anxious emotions, so explore them. What do horses offer you? Explore how you could recreate that sane good emotion in something else you do.


                    Here's my flight path to give you some perspective. I discovered what I am passionate about is fostering success and personal empowerment in others. I love teaching students, especially with fear issues, and I love fixing screwed up horses and teaching babies. So when I explored careers, I found management and employee development give me the same gratification. My corporate career is therefore just as fulfilling as teaching a scared rider how to canter, or teaching a bolter to trust contact.
                    Horses are just the most significant/first place you've gotten a taste of your purpose, that doesn't mean horses are your purpose.
                    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
                    chaque pas est fait ensemble

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                    • #30
                      You know, I buy my own insurance and with a high deductible, I only pay $99/month (with a MASSIVE hospitalization in the past and a habit of getting lots and lots of diagnostics ordered). The whole ZOMG YOU MUST SPEND A FORTUNE ON HEALTH INSURANCE scare story is not necessarily true. (The cost DID go up because of the new laws, as they had to add in a bunch of coverages I can't remove, for things like pediatrics and psychiatry and addiction treatment, which is annoying and a waste of my money, but it wasn't horrific.) And let's be honest and live in the real world-- the overwhelming majority of jobs don't have retirement benefits that are in any way meaningful and most will no longer offer health care anyway as it's going to be cost-prohibitive for employers. Just having a job with a paycheck isn't going to guarantee anything in the way of benefits no matter how many degrees you have.

                      (Yes, I sounds like a broken record on these threads, but I have degrees from great schools and it really wasn't worth the time or money. I should have majored in something I really liked, no matter how impractical, like acting. It would have been any less valuable.)

                      If you want to work with horses, work with horses. But sort out exactly what that means--it doesn't have to be riding and training. If you LIKE business classes and a business major, look at companies like Dover and SmartPak, or at barn or breeding-farm management. If you actually have an aptitude for the sciences, consider being a vet tech. Massage therapy doesn't require as much traditional school but it's a coming thing (heck, Lucky was the 'finals project' for a friend of the BO who was finishing her course in Equine Massage Therapy. Now she does horses and dogs was well.)
                      Author Page
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                      • #31
                        I think a lot of young people (mainly horse crazy girls) were in your shoes at some point. I would suggest that you heed the advice of other posters and, if possible, go to a school with an IHSA team so that you can ride while you are in college.

                        I did that and, even though I didn't ride on the actual competing team, I was a member of the Club. During my time there, I worked off some of my riding dues doing barn work, turning in and out, feeding, etc. etc. I took every opportunity to get extra ride time on some of the really nice donation horses. In addition, I went to some A shows and worked as a groom.

                        I loved doing all that, but it made me realize that I wanted a career that would pay for me to continue to be involved with horses. I knew that I could not own a horse and show and lesson and continue to do all the things that I love most about the sport.

                        So, I went to law school (which my parents graciously paid for) and now I own two horses. I am so glad I made the choice to get a good education which allowed me to get a stable job so that I could afford to have horses, take some lessons, and even go to the occasional show.

                        Get some work experience and then make your decision. Working with other people's horses all day may make you realize that you would like to have the money and time for one of your own. If you have a job in the horse industry, you may find that the money and time for a horse of your own is not in the cards for you.

                        Just keep an open mind so that you can capitalize on opportunities as they arise and make good decisions Good luck!
                        ALP
                        "The Prince" aka Front Row
                        Cavalier Manor

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                        • #32
                          My biggest advice to anyone who is 17 and so set on her path in life that the thought of anything else makes her "panicky" would be to go out there and experience everything you can. Seriously. Don't have such a limited view that you think nothing else can make you happy. I would say this whether your post said working with horses or becoming a doctor. Not because I think you shouldn't pursue your passions, but because I don't think you should be limited by them.

                          I know plenty of people who might say they are passionate about their work, but not nearly as many who could say, "I get to have a career in my life's great passion." But a career in something you enjoy might be the only way you get to pursue your passion as well.
                          <><

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                          • #33
                            I've seen many threads lately on this topic, and felt compelled to share a slightly different point of view.

                            When I was in my late teens, all I wanted to do was have a job with horses and train/compete at the highest levels. As soon as I turned 18, I moved 7 hours away to be a working student with a top trainer in my discipline.

                            However, I ran into the issue of needing health insurance and the only way to stay on my parent's plan at that point in time was to become a student. I wasn't thrilled about going to college, but things fell into place, I was able to take my horse with me, learned many new equine disciplines, met my future husband, and did paid working student positions over the summers.

                            What I didn't plan on, though, was starting to have health problems as a sophomore. Health issues that required I graduate and get a job with health insurance (who can pay $100,000+ hospital bills with most horse industry jobs?). I lost a bit of my dreams at that point--I could neither pursue a career in the horse industry and couldn't physically handle the demands of vet school, my other passion.

                            So I settled for a full-time job (plus benefits) with a feed company and slowly learned how much you can enjoy horses as a "hobby" versus a living. Within a year of graduating, I'd begun my career in veterinary medical publishing, which I've been doing for 9 years now and love!

                            In that time, my husband and I have had the opportunity to buy our own farm, compete with our wonderful horses and ponies, and pursue everything we love about horses without having to make our living doing it. Not to say that we don't do a sale or training here or there if the opportunity becomes available but it is certainly more enjoyable to do it because we want to not because we have to.

                            But during that same time, my health disintegrated to the point where I've been through 19 surgeries, had a permanent medical device implanted to manage pain that will never be cured only managed, struggle with the inevitable loss of stamina and strength I used to have and, more than once, have had to take days to weeks to months to years off of riding.

                            I feel very lucky to have a much better quality of life now due to the wonders of medical science and, because I couldn't ride for quite some time, I bought a weanling, a baby that I could watch grow up and not stress about riding and training right away. And I love him so much and it's become the best experience of my life. Riding him now as a coming 5-year-old reminds me that there was once a time when I couldn't ride at all.

                            What I am most grateful for (besides having an amazing husband who has truly lived up to "in sickness and in health"), though, is that my parents made me go to college...which gave me an education to fall back on and set me up for the success I currently experience with the job I love. What scares me is the thought of trying to make it in a business or career that is physically demanding because I could NOT do it. In fact, I count myself incredibly blessed that I work from home now because I don't know if I could handle working an outside job full time.

                            What I've found among those young and strong is, if you haven't dealt with a medical emergency or severe chronic health issue, it is very easy to feel like it will never happen to you. I love living vicariously through those who can pursue their dreams in the horse world but I do not regret the path my life has taken.

                            My advice is to think long term--get a quality education while you can--the horses will always be there. If you decide to take a horse-related/physical job, make sure you have health insurance and skills to fall back on if you are injured on the job or some type of disability plan. Plan for retirement because at some point your body is going to let you down as you get older. Just be smart about it and realize that life throws some curve balls you can never anticipate. The broader your experience and education, the better you can handle them.

                            And thank God for every day of health you have!

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                            • Original Poster

                              #34
                              Originally posted by Petstorejunkie View Post
                              May I coach you for a second? I felt very similar at your age, and I think if someone had correctly helped me explore those feelings earlier in life I could have gotten to my happy medium much quicker.

                              So, think about everything you love about the horse industry. The daily duties, the goals, the interactions, etc. now, narrow down what key components of it seem to bring out the biggest smile. Is it teaching and seeing a person experience a correct movement? Is it delivering a foal you've bred? Is it retraining ottbs into successful careers and watching them go into happy homes? The sweat in your brow and the ache in your muscles after mucking stalls? (You get the idea)
                              Next, look at each of those individually and ask yourself why you like them so much? What does it do for you?


                              Now, remove horses and think about where you can recreate those feelings.

                              I know that's probably bringing up anxious emotions, so explore them. What do horses offer you? Explore how you could recreate that sane good emotion in something else you do.


                              Here's my flight path to give you some perspective. I discovered what I am passionate about is fostering success and personal empowerment in others. I love teaching students, especially with fear issues, and I love fixing screwed up horses and teaching babies. So when I explored careers, I found management and employee development give me the same gratification. My corporate career is therefore just as fulfilling as teaching a scared rider how to canter, or teaching a bolter to trust contact.
                              Horses are just the most significant/first place you've gotten a taste of your purpose, that doesn't mean horses are your purpose.
                              Whoever you are, you're amazing. Yes, feel free to coach me. That's why I am here. I am absorbing everything you say. I understand what you mean, about recreating those feelings. Passion is nothing more than a bunch of strong emotions about a certain something. And breaking those emotions down, they can be found in something else. I get that. I feel strange. Whenever I take horses out of the picture, I feel afraid. Like I can't imagine not being with them. I feel dread, thinking about pursuing something without horses. Unless I'm just seriously confused about myself and my wants, or I've gone crazy, this is how I feel. Can you explain for me, Petstorejunkie?

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Just remember horses can always be a part of your life even if not your job...that is what a lot of us are telling you. I've had horses, dogs and cats in my life at all times...and always will. I ride...typically 2 horses a day in the early morning (though in super cold weather, they just get peppermints from me )....go to the office, and then check on them again at night. Horses are a huge part of my life but NOT my job.

                                Don't take horses out of the picture but sort through your feelings more about what you exactly like to do with them....what attracts you to the horses. The horses are just what you know now....and what is being suggested is to broaden your mind a bit and get to know yourself a bit deeper (but NOT get rid of horses). What it sounds like is that you may have a little fear of the unknown and change. Perfectly normal. Try and set that fear aside.
                                ** Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip. ~Winston Churchill? **

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by Horserider15 View Post
                                  Whoever you are, you're amazing. Yes, feel free to coach me. That's why I am here. I am absorbing everything you say. I understand what you mean, about recreating those feelings. Passion is nothing more than a bunch of strong emotions about a certain something. And breaking those emotions down, they can be found in something else. I get that. I feel strange. Whenever I take horses out of the picture, I feel afraid. Like I can't imagine not being with them. I feel dread, thinking about pursuing something without horses. Unless I'm just seriously confused about myself and my wants, or I've gone crazy, this is how I feel. Can you explain for me, Petstorejunkie?
                                  You can do horses without being with them 24/7/365. I think to be honest you're 17 and the big wide world is a scary place so you're turning to what you know for comfort, because everyone is asking you what you want to do.

                                  That's not to say that maybe you couldn't make a go of it. My advice for you is to go to school WITHOUT DEBT, even if that means the school has a crappy or no equestrian program at all. Being debt free when you graduate will be the biggest key to being able to afford to have horses right away. Keep riding, maybe do a working student position but just understand that even a working student position is not the same thing as being on your own as a trainer.

                                  I work from home and am working on buying a property so I can have my horse right outside and go riding on my lunch hour, which is whenever I want it to be because I work for myself. My good job and degree (and a wonderful soon-to-be husband who doesn't get it but is willing to give up his yard for it) let me have that.
                                  Originally posted by PeanutButterPony
                                  you can shackle your pony to a lawn chair at the show...so long as its in a conservative color.

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                                  • #37
                                    Just a very quick response from someone who works in the industry and felt a lot like you do for a long, long time. My tune has changed a bit, now.

                                    I still love horses. They are still my passion and the only reason I am getting out of the house on this cold morning (otherwise, I'd be back in bed!). But, I have experienced just about every bad thing you can imagine from this industry in the last year + and it has made me seriously reconsider my life path.

                                    The horse industry is TOUGH. Not just in the "hard work for no money" sort of way (I did that for years, gladly), but in that when you are truly passionate about it, when things go bad, it is pretty soul crushing. The people can be hard to take, your best horse breaks, you struggle to get the results you need to get the clients you need to pay your bills. It is a tough, tough industry and not one to be taken on lightly.

                                    I never thought I would be someone who would be looking for a way out, and I don't even know if my thoughts are truly running toward "out" more as a MUCH different way of being part of it. But, I now understand why people do get out. It's tough. Very, very tough.

                                    Like I said, I still love the horses. I love riding, I miss teaching (current job does not including teaching like my last one did). I love immersing myself in great coaching. But I'm not sure, once my tenure is up here, I will keep heading down this path.

                                    I would be more than willing to share some of the tougher aspects with you via PM, if you'd like. I don't necessarily want to discourage you, and I am glad you are planning for a college education. But, I've got quite a few years on you now. I remember being your age. I remember that feeling of "there is nothing I want to do other than this". But, no one was around to say "hey, it IS great...but are you tough enough?"

                                    BTW, I have health insurance, workman's comp, I make an ok amount of money (especially when you consider I get nice housing as part of my compensation in an expensive area and my horses lives for free in a high end boarding facility). So, yeah, you can get all the stuff you would get in a regular job...though, I spent 8 years without a lot of that (but doing a job I was crazy about). I like my job now, but it isn't my passion.
                                    Amanda

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                                    • #38
                                      I think your passion to become a professional is great. When I was your age I was a working student for my trainer. I loved it. I had every intention of going professional as well. At that time I did not have the desire to teach students, rather just train and sell horses (as well as compete). I decided to go to college look at other fields and feel like I made the best decision by not pursuing the riding professionally. I have watched several friends become very successful doing it, but I have also watched several fail. I think it takes the right type of person and backing. Don't give up on that dream but explore all possibilities. What about veterinary school if you want to work with horses? Medical insurance is expensive for comprehensive coverage with low deductibles. That doesn't mean you won't be able to get it. Go to school, get your degree, continue to ride (IHSA, working student, catch ride) and see where the roads take you. What is meant to be will be, everything has a way of working itself out.

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                                      • #39
                                        Amanda, I am really glad you chimed in here. And I totally understand the passion for horses and looking for another path to making a living and still keeping horses.

                                        I went through a time period where I thought seriously about making horses a career. And I had some financial backing. But when I do the math, the "job outside the industry" wins. And I think I am happier getting out everyday, going to an office, seeing and talking with others, and all that comes with working outside of the barn. And I can probably afford more in the way of competitions and training, than I ever could if I were working in the horse industry. And I will probably last longer because I do not do as much hard labor associated with riding multiple horses all day or with running a barn.

                                        Working in the industry just seems like too much work!

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                                        • #40
                                          It is a very individual decision, of course. But, I look around at everyone I grew up riding with, including a couple who decided to "chase the dream" of becoming a professional... and I am very glad I chose a different path.

                                          One friend is an absolutely brilliant rider (and also a very good instructor) who has a small sales business. She is talented and knowledgeable enough to compete at at least the GP level, but doesn't have the horses to do so. So she rides and trains and sells mostly amateur horses. She is able to do that because her husband has a good corporate job, and supports her. The money she makes from sales is essentially their "fun" money. She does not winter in FL, have a horse of her own to show, or any help other than a guy who comes in in the mornings to help feed and muck out.

                                          Another very close friend runs what is outwardly a successful boarding/show barn. She has about 25 horses or so at her leased facility. She works 6-7 days a week, does the training and paperwork in the morning and teaches from mid afternoon til about 8 pm or so. She has gotten to the point where she has some nice clients and horses in her program, and they do well at the local A shows. She took her first real vacation *ever* this past year... a long weekend at the beach, staying at a place owned by one of the clients. She does not have health insurance... she can't afford it. She does not have any retirement savings, either. She is my age (late 40s) and although she does love what she does, it is getting old to be living month to month with no savings and the knowledge that any one incident - a health issue, a car problem, or even a few clients losing jobs and leaving the barn - could cause the business to go under.

                                          Then there is the super talented guy who imports and sells very fancy young horses. He is also about my age, and is probably the most successful of my friends in the horse business. He sells probably 6-7 nice horses a year, lives on the road, and shows a lot. For the last year, he has had a very talented (but quirky) 1.4m horse, so he's gotten to show in the Sunday classes. He's not the winner there, but maybe a low ribbon on a good day. He is able to stay in business because his wife - an amateur jumper rider he met when he was giving clinics to make money on the side - is an investment banker who pays the mortgage and covers the shortfalls in his business in between sales.

                                          I am biased for sure, since I chose to have a non-horsey career after a brief foray into the horses as a barn manager for an amateur's private barn. I am now lucky enough to be one of the amateur ladies I used to envy as a horse crazy kid. I have a couple of really nice horses that I can keep in excellent programs with good training and fabulous care. If they get sick or hurt, I can afford them whatever treatment they might need. I can lesson whenever I like, show as much as I want to, etc. I ride pretty much every day, and have gotten good enough (through all those lessons, LOL, not native ability) that I have my pick of other horses to ride; my trainer has lots of nice sales horses that are really fun.

                                          I also genuinely enjoy my (non horsey) job. It has been an introduction to some very interesting people, and I get a great deal of satisfaction from what I do. It has also allowed me to support my family well, and it offers excellent benefits, including health insurance that is mostly company-paid and a terrific retirement plan.

                                          Sorry for the novel, but I see so many girls who just love being at the barn and being around the horses, who decide that this is how they want to spend their days. The reality of a professional's life is mostly very different from what it appears from the amateur/junior side of the equation... they do not ride and compete all day. They teach, deal with things like the hay guy who hasn't shown up, the client who hasn't paid their bills, or is dissatisfied and creating issues with the other customers, the XYZ that broke on the truck - which means there is no transportation the show this weekend unless it gets fixed, with $$$ you don't have and did I mention dealing with clients who are crazy? There is also help that doesn't show up, the landlord who just upped the lease on the farm by a couple grand - even though you can barely afford it now, and can't raise your rates and keep your clients... the list goes on. The job is mostly NOT riding and competing all day. Just something to think about.
                                          Last edited by Lucassb; Feb. 2, 2013, 09:49 AM.
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                                          -PaulaEdwina

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