• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Tell me about OTQH's

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Tell me about OTQH's

    Saw the post on the registered AQHA horses and then looked at one of the OTQH's listed from Canter. That one seems to be built very differently from the QH's that I see here in VA or in the western classes around.

    Can you please give me some background on them? Do they tend to move differently from the QH's I'm familiar with? Are they better sport horse prospects?

    One of my trainers has had a few QH's in her barn over the years that have gone up to prelim and a few nice show hunters as well. I'm not sure of where they got them from, however, the brains on these guys have been to die for.

    Would love some info on them! Thanks.
    For things to do in Loudoun County, visit: www.365thingstodoloudoun.com

  • #2
    Most of what is a racing QH these days is mostly TB anymore. So you'll see alot of TB looking ones. There are still some that resemble what an AQHA should be (by the standards first written for the breed), but look close at pedigree, you'll see a bunch of TB there.
    "As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use."- William James
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Proud member of the Wheat Loss Clique.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, I have noticed this too! The OTQH also have some height to them which is good for me. The QHs that I have looked at locally, not raced, are on average 14.2 hh. I found one where the owner stated that the horse was huge. I called, he is 15 HH. When I have talked to those in the local AQHA show, they tell me they like shorter. Good for barrels and reining as well as roping cows. I still like 16 hh or taller so another challenge to overcome while on my QH search.
      I checked out the CANTER CA QHs and they do look different from the non-racing stock here.
      www.ottbjumpers.weebly.com

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        I thought that one on the other post looked more tb'y... do you think that they are easier to restart since they do have some qh brains in them? I know the OTTB's are trying to make a comeback with all the publicity, but I like the non TB's or TB / crosses... so these QH's with a lot of TB actually are appealing...thanks!
        For things to do in Loudoun County, visit: www.365thingstodoloudoun.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Knightrider sending you a PM!

          Comment


          • #6
            I didn't relies that CANTER did anything but TBs. I have only one personal experience with a race-bred QH and it was not a positive one. She was Streakin Six bred and, man was she HOT.
            Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
            The Blog

            Comment


            • #7
              KR, your pm's are full! Here I'll just post it here:


              I worked for several years on a farm that bred QHs for the track. While I don't have any experience on the track, I handled them both before and after racing. I would highly recommend them. Most of them today have so much TB blood in them (if they reach a certain Speed Index, they are allowed to be registered full QH, even if they're an Appendix) that they are taller, leaner, and less "stocky pony" looking. So they are very athletic, but they have a much quieter mind. Most of the time-obviously there's one in every crowd that's hot and sensitive, but as a whole, they are quiet, fast learners, very trustworthy. I sat on many of them within a couple of weeks coming home, and could do a nice, quiet, w/t/c with brakes AND steering
              The only drawbacks I could see is if you're looking at doing upper level competition (idk what discipline you ride), is that they tend to not have as much stamina as a TB, and they don't have the same movement that a TB or WB has.
              I'm an eventer, so things I would look for are a longer frame, nice floaty strides in dressage, but also have the distance in them to run XC. QH's got their name because they ran a quarter mile race. They're QUICK-most would beat an TB out of the gate- but they normally can't hold it over longer distances.
              Hope this helps!

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Thanks Talkofthetown... my inbox has been emptied...

                Your description is what I was thinking was appealing... i'm not interested in an upper level horse and I don't event anymore... I'm in foxhunting territory so I'd like the mind for some hilltopping / trail riding and just as a nice pony club type of resale project. I have room for another horse at home and will be looking later in the year when I send the pony off for training... so no hurry, but have been poking around at things.
                For things to do in Loudoun County, visit: www.365thingstodoloudoun.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Best horse I have ever owned is an OTQH. He is 50% TB. He is now retired at 25, but he took my daughter from short stirrup to children's hunter. Fabulous horse.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I would be seriously cautious about getting on OTQH unless you know where they are coming from. I worked on track with them for a few years. A lot of loose screws, a lot of abusive practices in that world, a lot of physical maladies because they run hard fast and young. They want these horses HOT, want them jumping out of their skin. Not uncommon for jockeys to whip them in the head during post parade to get them worked up, and they can be very explosive and reactionary under saddle.

                    However there are many very nice, sane and healthy ones as well. I wouldn't say to run screaming from all OTQHs, but I would use extreme caution buying one straight from the track without trustworthy inside info.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I had one. He was sensitive, but not unduly so. He did have an EPIC buck in him. EPIC. He was a better than average mover, and built more like an appendix than a QH, he was about 16.1 and not too stocky, most people were surprised he was AQHA. I had hoped to event him, but he had persistent laminitis and now is a servicably sound trail horse.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BansheeBreeze View Post
                        I would be seriously cautious about getting on OTQH unless you know where they are coming from. I worked on track with them for a few years. A lot of loose screws, a lot of abusive practices in that world, a lot of physical maladies because they run hard fast and young. They want these horses HOT, want them jumping out of their skin. Not uncommon for jockeys to whip them in the head during post parade to get them worked up, and they can be very explosive and reactionary under saddle.

                        However there are many very nice, sane and healthy ones as well. I wouldn't say to run screaming from all OTQHs, but I would use extreme caution buying one straight from the track without trustworthy inside info.
                        I don't know where you worked, but some of what you say is hard to believe, have never heard of it and I trained for years and ran in different NM and TX tracks.

                        If anyone would have been rough on a horse, much less "a jockey beating a horse over the head", the stewards would have set that jockey down right then.
                        Unless you are taking about some unrecognized brush track in the middle of nowhere and that I would not call racing.

                        No one wants "a horse jumping out of their skin", they will lose the race before they start if you get them hot and washing out.

                        One reason OTQH are not very common is because, first, there are not that many of them around and second, there are many waiting to buy them as soon as one comes up for sale, because they are very nice horses for so much else.

                        We had a standing order from a trainer in the East for any one that fit his criteria, that included they be larger.
                        He would sell most to fox hunting stables.
                        Many barrel racing trainers today have race horse trainers looking for them, so do ropers.

                        Sure, you can find some bad actors in anything, including OTQH also.
                        You need to check any horse you are interested in carefully, no matter where it comes from, especially today, when some have unsound horses that they inject and sell and days/weeks later you have a lame horse.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                          You need to check any horse you are interested in carefully, no matter where it comes from, especially today, when some have unsound horses that they inject and sell and days/weeks later you have a lame horse.
                          YES.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            They are like any horse (off track or not), some are incredibly calm, some are more hot/wired, some are injured, some will be sound for 20 years. As with ANY horse purchase, use caution and common sense.

                            However, I have known many OTQHs, and there are many, many good ones. Many of them are bigger (16hh+), but their body styles vary. They are in high demand for barrel racing and rodeo events, etc, which is why they can be harder to come by.

                            I had an OTQH, she was off the track a couple months (let down at owner's farm). Stood about 16hh, muscled and stout, and had a huge, lovely, swinging canter that would make you weep to ride it.

                            Was riding her within a few weeks, and trail riding her within a couple months. It was highly uneventful, with the exception that I did learn it's a bad idea to smootch at them when you want them to canter -- she interpreted that as "BREAK FROM THE GATE AND RUN!!" which was exciting the first time it happened

                            But a lovely, willing horse. I would totally get one again!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BansheeBreeze View Post
                              I would be seriously cautious about getting on OTQH unless you know where they are coming from. I worked on track with them for a few years. A lot of loose screws, a lot of abusive practices in that world, a lot of physical maladies because they run hard fast and young. They want these horses HOT, want them jumping out of their skin. Not uncommon for jockeys to whip them in the head during post parade to get them worked up, and they can be very explosive and reactionary under saddle.

                              However there are many very nice, sane and healthy ones as well. I wouldn't say to run screaming from all OTQHs, but I would use extreme caution buying one straight from the track without trustworthy inside info.
                              THIS!!! You saved me a lot of typing!! Any of the racing/OTQH's I've seen around Oklahoma have been pretty spazzed out. SPEED is everything and some trainers don't care how they get it. I wouldn't touch any of the ones I've seen around here!!!
                              www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
                              Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by crosscreeksh View Post
                                THIS!!! You saved me a lot of typing!! Any of the racing/OTQH's I've seen around Oklahoma have been pretty spazzed out. SPEED is everything and some trainers don't care how they get it. I wouldn't touch any of the ones I've seen around here!!!
                                Maybe you are seeing some badly trained race horses, but then, how familiar are you with race horses?
                                Do you realize that those are extremely fit athletes, "on the muscle" and ready for a tremendous effort and well trained to control that energy for that, in ways that maybe to those that don't know any better may make them seem "spazzed out"?

                                There is a reason generally race horses are "let down" when not racing, so they are not so sharp, but "spazzed out" would be a whole different kettle of fish.
                                If some is acting crazy, I would say it is not up to running well and consistently and that will keep it from winning or placing, that is the idea of racing after all.

                                Our last stallion came off his last race one Sunday and was hauled home Monday.
                                We were branding calves Tuesday and that is the horse I rode that morning, with his little rope nose hackamore and he was just the same horse that left to go to the track a year before that.

                                A well trained horse is the same if it is a race horse or a barrel horse or a jumper.
                                Bad actors you can find any place and I don't think the track has any more than any other place.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                                  I don't know where you worked, but some of what you say is hard to believe, have never heard of it and I trained for years and ran in different NM and TX tracks.

                                  If anyone would have been rough on a horse, much less "a jockey beating a horse over the head", the stewards would have set that jockey down right then.
                                  Unless you are taking about some unrecognized brush track in the middle of nowhere and that I would not call racing.

                                  No one wants "a horse jumping out of their skin", they will lose the race before they start if you get them hot and washing out.

                                  One reason OTQH are not very common is because, first, there are not that many of them around and second, there are many waiting to buy them as soon as one comes up for sale, because they are very nice horses for so much else.

                                  We had a standing order from a trainer in the East for any one that fit his criteria, that included they be larger.
                                  He would sell most to fox hunting stables.
                                  Many barrel racing trainers today have race horse trainers looking for them, so do ropers.

                                  Sure, you can find some bad actors in anything, including OTQH also.
                                  You need to check any horse you are interested in carefully, no matter where it comes from, especially today, when some have unsound horses that they inject and sell and days/weeks later you have a lame horse.
                                  I'm assuming you haven't been to New Mexico in awhile then because that's how its done now. The riders dont do it on camera, but they do it, they just wait until after the warmup, while the horses are walking around before going to the gates and the tv is just showing the odds, they know exactly where do to it and how to watch the cameras in the towers to know when they aren't being seen. Usually it's a hard crack on the shoulder or belly, sometimes a bop on the head or side of the face to keep them running straight. I ponied the races, I hated doing the QH's because of the whipping and because they were often so jacked up between that and the drugs, they were hard to keep in one piece. Not all the riders/trainers did this of course, like I said, but it was more common than not. One of the regular leading riders would do it on both the QH's AND the TB's and I think everybody just tried copying him. QH races are so short, they want them "awake" and ready to explode. That's their theory anyways.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by BansheeBreeze View Post
                                    I'm assuming you haven't been to New Mexico in awhile then because that's how its done now. The riders dont do it on camera, but they do it, they just wait until after the warmup, while the horses are walking around before going to the gates and the tv is just showing the odds, they know exactly where do to it and how to watch the cameras in the towers to know when they aren't being seen. Usually it's a hard crack on the shoulder or belly, sometimes a bop on the head or side of the face to keep them running straight. I ponied the races, I hated doing the QH's because of the whipping and because they were often so jacked up between that and the drugs, they were hard to keep in one piece. Not all the riders/trainers did this of course, like I said, but it was more common than not. One of the regular leading riders would do it on both the QH's AND the TB's and I think everybody just tried copying him. QH races are so short, they want them "awake" and ready to explode. That's their theory anyways.
                                    Right, I have not been there for long now, but it just doesn't make much sense that any trainer would let a jockey, that already has a handful of horse ready to load in the gates, be beating on it.
                                    That would be counterproductive to all the training to get that horse quietly in the gate.
                                    They are already so anxious and on the edge of acting up, if not handled just right.
                                    Trainers look for jockeys that can handle the horses well, not beat them around.

                                    Not saying that there may not be an idiot or two out there doing who knows what, but I don't think they would last long, would not get any rides.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      [QUOTE=Bluey;6780226]Maybe you are seeing some badly trained race horses, but then, how familiar are you with race horses?
                                      Do you realize that those are extremely fit athletes, "on the muscle" and ready for a tremendous effort and well trained to control that energy for that, in ways that maybe to those that don't know any better may make them seem "spazzed out"?
                                      *******************

                                      I'm VERY familiar with TB race horses..DH trained at the major east coast tracks for 40+ years and I was a licenced trainer for about half that time. I know a "spazzed" horse when I see it. When the races are a mere 220, 440 yards long the trainers/jocks want them hot and fired up!! I don't know about the whipping them into a frenzy in plain sight, but I do know of the use of "joints", hot shots and drop cords used at the barns and on the track before the races. I spoke of first hand knowledge of the OTQH's I've seen in the Oklahoma area. I'm sure there are some nice QH's around....it is my favorite "all purpose" using breed. I just question their suitablity "post race training" in this part of the world. A sweet, pleasant, slow QH won't have much use in the speed, speed and more speed world of racing QH's. It's not like they are running a mile or more like TB's. Nothing against the breed...just what I've seen here.
                                      www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
                                      Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Way back when (the 80's)

                                        When I was 16 I got a 3 yr old OTQH. He'd raced on Sunday and was for sale on Monday (dead last). I bought him on Tuesday. Now, I was just an average (or not much better than) 4H kid who'd been riding for 8 years and had parents that didn't know any better.

                                        I started riding Jet right away. The one noticeable thing with him was that in the first 2 months he had absolutely no stamina, was skinny as could be despite pouring large volumes of oats into him - and he grew 2.5 inches. Once he finished that growth spurt, his ribs sprang, he had stamina and was a decent horse.

                                        The next year when his wolf teeth came in we had rearing problems, but overall he was a nice horse. He'd been handled rough (the old make them 'aggressive' theory), but was never a real problem.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X