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Help I cant seem to give my horse away!

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  • #41
    Originally posted by mbp618 View Post
    I need to place my horse in a new home I have tried everywhere the giveaway section other various websites
    Hes 17 year old retired eq horse who had a bad injury back in 06 which left him with ring bone and a ever so slight hitch in the walk not that noticeable
    He can be ridden but has not been consistently ridden since last fall
    This horse means the world to me but I can no longer afford to keep
    Does anyone know where I can place ads or donating him some where?
    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated
    Please help
    If he really does mean the world to you, then do the kindest thing for him.

    Have him euthenaised at home, in surroundings he knows.

    Every time we buy a horse, we know it is heartbreak on legs. If you cannot afford to keep him, then why risk him going somewhere and being buted up and ridden? The best thing to do is have him PTS.

    Owning a horse is like a marriage - in sickness and in health. Either way, we owe it to our horses to do what is right for them, however difficult and heart breaking that decision may be for us as owners.

    Paddy
    "Chaos, panic and disorder. My work here is done"

    ~Member of the "Addicted to Lessons" clique~

    Comment


    • #42
      Originally posted by eyeswideopen123 View Post
      I am with many of the others. I am sorry to say this mbp but if you really cared for your horse you would put him down at home where you know that he had a great life and went in peace. Many to most of the "give away" horses belong to someone that on the outside looks like they are trying to find a good home but on the inside I feel like they are trying to hand off their problems to someone else or they cannot handle putting their horse down. As someone that breeds and sells horses, I see it as someone pawning off their problem on someone else. This is an old, unsound, possibly hardkeeper (I say this as he is a TB) that will probably have to be medicated in the short term and likely put down in thenearby future due to arthritis and ringbone.

      ON A quick tangent...
      Just like the rescue organizations that "rescue" 28 year old, thin, lame, sad wornout, foundered horses that have possibly been giveaways at one time and then use donations to pay to feed these sad but useless horses and find them homes instead of rescueing babies, OTTBs, unbroke horses etc. Euthanasia is the best choice for these old, unwanted, poor animals. Not new homes.This is why there is no bottom value on the horse market. People have no where to put their unwanted or unsound or rearing or crazy or unrehabable animals so there is no room for a horse that is worth a second chance. Again leading back to the overpopulation of horses and the rediculous anti-slaughter rule...

      *ok I knew i shouldn't go there... Just so you know I am not pro slaughter in by any means but we sure have gotten ourselves into a BIG mess*
      Welcome to COTH. FYI, there is no "ridiculous anti-slaughter rule." More American horses are being slaughtered this year than in recent years, they are just being shipped across the border because there are no slaughter houses for horsemeat for human consumption currently operating in the U.S., not because it is illegal federally, but because the states where these slaughter houses used to operate passed state laws prohibiting this practice.

      OP, I'm sorry you're in this situation, and I agree with the majority of posters that euthanasia is your best option.
      \"Non-violence never solved anything.\" C. Montgomery Burns

      Comment


      • #43
        You have a responsibility to your horse. Realize that euthanasia and disposal of the body is not free. Hay, grain, shavings, vaccinations are not free. You are giving away your horse - for free - but asking people to accept the burden of the highest cost of the deal- the care. The day to day care. I purchased a $3500 horse on April 1st. I have now spent more than her purchase price on shoes and board.

        It is a better deal for someone to purchase a sound horse- at the low prices that are out there now, than to take on your horse for free. Oh- you might get lucky, well, your horse might get lucky, but chances are when he becomes an unwanted or unaffordable expense to his new home that they won't be so particular as to where he ends up.

        Retire him or euthanize him. There are places that pasture board or retiree board for low prices. Put your energy into finding one and finding the money to pay board. Or give him a nice last few days and have him euthanized.

        Comment


        • #44
          This is a bit different but I would really appreciate thoughts on this. I have two horses, one is eight and one is appx. fourteen now. I am 68. I hope to be around for a long long time (am very active, ride a lot, do all my farm chores, etc.) as so far I am very healthy but who knows. If I died my poor husband would try to care for our animals but I'm really afraid he wouldn't do a good job. With things the way they are these days I'd be really afraid of my horses being sold or given away. One tends to be a bit hot and he's small. The other is the perfect horse for me but tends to not like other people so much. No one has ever been on her but me. When I first got her she tended to be really bull headed, stubborn, balky, etc. etc. I can see her being that way again in different hands. My friends are also OLD so you couldn't guarntee a forever home for them there. I'm really thinking about telling my family if I died to have my horses put down even if they were young and healthy...would that be terrible?? The thought of it makes me sick but it makes me sicker to think they could end up being abused or neglected or on the slaughter trail. I"ve no where near made up my mind on this but I've thought about it. Planning on doing a new will soon so it's been on my mind. Would this be terribly unfair? Thoughts?
          You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.

          Comment


          • #45
            Nope, not terrible. A little sad, but I'd rather a little sadness than a life of uncertainty. I have approached people in my life that I love and trust, left money for my horses' care, with instructions on what to do with each of them. If those people could not care for my horses, they would be euthanized.

            Comment


            • #46
              Originally posted by pj View Post
              This is a bit different but I would really appreciate thoughts on this. I have two horses, one is eight and one is appx. fourteen now. I am 68. I hope to be around for a long long time (am very active, ride a lot, do all my farm chores, etc.) as so far I am very healthy but who knows. If I died my poor husband would try to care for our animals but I'm really afraid he wouldn't do a good job. With things the way they are these days I'd be really afraid of my horses being sold or given away. One tends to be a bit hot and he's small. The other is the perfect horse for me but tends to not like other people so much. No one has ever been on her but me. When I first got her she tended to be really bull headed, stubborn, balky, etc. etc. I can see her being that way again in different hands. My friends are also OLD so you couldn't guarntee a forever home for them there. I'm really thinking about telling my family if I died to have my horses put down even if they were young and healthy...would that be terrible?? The thought of it makes me sick but it makes me sicker to think they could end up being abused or neglected or on the slaughter trail. I"ve no where near made up my mind on this but I've thought about it. Planning on doing a new will soon so it's been on my mind. Would this be terribly unfair? Thoughts?
              I think it is incredibly wonderful of you to consider this. My husband and I are going to do a will outlining the horses and where they should go. Namely we have some close horse-folk friends that I would want to find them good homes, and help my family to do so.
              Celtic Pride Farm
              www.celticpridefarm.com
              Become a fan on Facebook!

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              • #47
                pj, i admire your thoughtfulness. we all need to think about an exit stradegy for all our animals. a humane end is the best gift we can give in some circumstances.

                Comment


                • #48
                  What I've done is put together a list of people I would like my family to offer my horses to if somethign should happen to me. They're friends and other family members who I would trust with my kids. I've also listed a couple of rescues. Then I've told my family that if they cannot find them a home, I would prefer they be put down rather than sent to auction. But i would like the family to try finding a home first.

                  Originally posted by pj View Post
                  This is a bit different but I would really appreciate thoughts on this. I have two horses, one is eight and one is appx. fourteen now. I am 68. I hope to be around for a long long time (am very active, ride a lot, do all my farm chores, etc.) as so far I am very healthy but who knows. If I died my poor husband would try to care for our animals but I'm really afraid he wouldn't do a good job. With things the way they are these days I'd be really afraid of my horses being sold or given away. One tends to be a bit hot and he's small. The other is the perfect horse for me but tends to not like other people so much. No one has ever been on her but me. When I first got her she tended to be really bull headed, stubborn, balky, etc. etc. I can see her being that way again in different hands. My friends are also OLD so you couldn't guarntee a forever home for them there. I'm really thinking about telling my family if I died to have my horses put down even if they were young and healthy...would that be terrible?? The thought of it makes me sick but it makes me sicker to think they could end up being abused or neglected or on the slaughter trail. I"ve no where near made up my mind on this but I've thought about it. Planning on doing a new will soon so it's been on my mind. Would this be terribly unfair? Thoughts?
                  Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

                  Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    Blessings to you who have thought ahead. This summer one of the women that boards where I do was found dead in her garden, apparently of a heart attack. She left behind two ridable horses at our barn and one retiree at another barn. there was a bit of a dilemma getting things settled because at one point she'd talked to the barn manager about giving her the two horses, but I don't believe she'd updated her will. The woman with the retiree offered to take on the other two, but it worked out that the barn manager took one and the deceased woman's trainer took one and I think everyone has ended up happy so far. I wasn't privy to the details, so I don't know if the final 'distribution' was from the will or just mutually agreed upon, but am very thankful that it worked out for the best.
                    As I prepare to look for my next horse partner, I know I'll need to consider what will happen if I should go first....likelihood is low, but still there.
                    Sheri
                    www.onthemuscle.com
                    www.cafepress.com/onthemuscle

                    Comment


                    • #50
                      Thank you so much to those who responded. It really makes me feel better. I could leave money for my horses to be cared for but to who? As I said my friends are as old and some older than I am. The younger members of my family would mean well but none are really horse people and not only would they not know what to do and when but I think my horses would be a burden on them. There is nothing I would like better than to be with my horses as they grow old, to care for and pamper them through their old age but that really isn't likely to be possible. Your thoughts have eased my mind and I think this is what I will do. <s> If there is something like a rainbow bridge I'll wait til they get there. Thank you all again so much. this makes me cry.
                      You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        mpb, you have a pm

                        Comment


                        • #52
                          No, PJ, I think you are being thoughtful and kindhearted, and courageous as well. My aunt recently asked for help finding a retirement home for her gelding, who has health issues and is no longer rideable--since I live far from her I think she was asking in hopes that I'd take him here on the farm. I won't; not only do we not have a stall free, but, more importantly, I sense that she feels very differently about euthanasia than I do, and is much more hesitant to put an end to suffering. I won't have a horse on the farm that I can't put down if I'm convinced it's best to do so.

                          In a related note, we were given a pony--a small packer with serious but probably manageable health problems--six years ago, for our very young daughter. I was impressed that the owners made me physically say, while looking them in the eye, that I would put the pony down if I couldn't keep him free from pain. Happily we've been able to keep him feeling good, so that even though my daughter's now outgrown him he's very content, but I respected their insistence that I be emotionally able to do it.. (We do share a farrier, who sends reports back and forth, so that they know the pony is doing well.)

                          Comment


                          • #53
                            I know how difficult this is for you

                            And I know L.I. There's virtually no place to retire a horse with his issues. It's primarily boarding barns, some backyard barns and a few larger facilities out east. Space is extremely limited. What space is available for horses is very, very expensive.

                            FairWeather hit the nail right on the head: "If you cannot afford two horses, deal with the one you have, the one who gave you years of service, the one you COMMITTED to all those sound years ago."

                            However, I agree with those who say that under these circumstances, with his physical issues, either keep him and sell the youngster or give him a peaceful end. Like others, I've been in this situation. I bought by dear old TB when he was 2. Went through some very, very lean times, difficult times and seemingly hopeless times. I worked 3 jobs to keep him. I don't make big bucks and I've lived on L.I. my entire life. He passed away at 29. I made a life long commitment - through thick and thin. Anything less would be a betrayal of my best friend. I've made the same promise to my little mare.

                            No one here is condemning you for what you're doing - but most of us draw on personal experience and passion. That's why we feel so strongly about this issue. If you can't find a safe retirement home for him, then do the right thing by him and put him down.

                            Comment


                            • #54
                              I think that I would want my horses euthanized if I were to die and my family couldn't take care of them properly. I sadly know what is out there and I would never want that for my horses.........there are some things worse than death!
                              RIP Sucha Smooth Whiskey
                              May 17,2004 - March 29, 2010
                              RIP San Lena Peppy
                              May 3, 1991 - March 11, 2010

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                Originally posted by Sneekers View Post
                                And I know L.I. There's virtually no place to retire a horse with his issues. It's primarily boarding barns, some backyard barns and a few larger facilities out east. Space is extremely limited. What space is available for horses is very, very expensive.
                                I know a lot of people who do not retire locally, but send their horses to where land is cheap and plentiful for pasture retirement. In fact, I was chatting with someone just the other day who is sending her horse to somewhere in the midwest for $250/month including all regular farrier/vet care.

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #56
                                  ok well im not putting him to sleep thats not an option for me I will get a second job before I would do that
                                  thanks for all of your advice
                                  I do have two other horses one is for sale and the sale is pending
                                  So I am just going to look into retirement farms for my guy
                                  thanks

                                  Comment


                                  • #57
                                    [QUOTE=Ambrey;3570905]I know a lot of people who do not retire locally, but send their horses to where land is cheap and plentiful for pasture retirement. In fact, I was chatting with someone just the other day who is sending her horse to somewhere in the midwest for $250/month including all regular farrier/vet care.[/QUOT
                                    Ambrey, I know this thread isn't about me and what I would want to do but I have to say this: I would NEVER send my horse out of state or any distance to be retired. I know there are some honest, caring places but you never know. I've heard too many horror tales about people thinking their horses were doing well and being well cared for and in the end they weren't.
                                    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.

                                    Comment


                                    • #58
                                      Ryerss is a retirement home in PA with a good reputation, but it has a waiting list and doesn't take them until they are at least 20. But you could put him in on the list before he's 20. I briefly considered it for my TB but could not relinquish his care, probably like many on this board.

                                      mbp, I respect your inability to euthanize him at this point, but just know there is less shame in giving him a peaceful end than making a decision which could open the door to neglect and heartache. Of course, you can probably find many places to trim your budget to provide a retirement for him if you aren't able to stomach putting him to sleep just yet.

                                      And to PB, I used to take lessons at a barn full of older horses, and the BO/instructor was an older, single woman who lived alone. Out of curiosity one day I asked what would happen to the horses if they outlived her (I know, I admit I'm a nosy SOB), and she said that she had a notarized directive giving her power of attorney the funding to euthanize and dispose of all of them. I respect her immensely for that, knowing that they will not suffer. Yes, there's a chance they could be placed elsewhere, but so much bigger chance that they wouldn't. Better to know, I say.

                                      Comment


                                      • #59
                                        Originally posted by mbp618 View Post
                                        ok well im not putting him to sleep thats not an option for me I will get a second job before I would do that
                                        thanks for all of your advice
                                        I do have two other horses one is for sale and the sale is pending
                                        So I am just going to look into retirement farms for my guy
                                        thanks
                                        You could look for cheap pasture type board to ease your cost as some have mentioned. Not a retirement facility but just find a cheaper place to keep him.

                                        What ever you do don't donate him to a college or therapeutic riding facility thinking they will give him a good forever home. Not all but many are notorious for dumping horses into bad situations.

                                        Just got a foundered pony from a therapeutic facility, you would think taking on a foundered pony with rotation enough but I had to pay for her to boot! I felt bad for her, she is 14 and deserves better and she is wonderful with the kids.

                                        Times are bad, hope you find a workable solution.
                                        No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle. ~Winston Churchill

                                        Comment


                                        • #60
                                          Originally posted by pj View Post
                                          I would NEVER send my horse out of state or any distance to be retired. I know there are some honest, caring places but you never know. I've heard too many horror tales about people thinking their horses were doing well and being well cared for and in the end they weren't.
                                          Sure, there are terrible moronic fools out there who will try to swindle people by claiming to be a good retirement facility when, in reality, they are neglecting the horses. This is where continuing to be a responsible owner comes in - retiring a horse is more than just taking out your check book every month. (I know, sometimes it is hard enough to get people to even do that much...) Research needs to be put into finding a reputable place and then continuing to monitor your horses care to the best of your ability.

                                          My experience with the out of state place I retired one of my guys has been fantastic! In fact, last spring I considered bringing him back closer to home - the shipper had been scheduled and the vet had already come out for the coggins - but decided against it at the last minute. I felt he was too happy and too integrated with his herd mates to do that to him.

                                          For every one "horror story" I have heard about a horse going into retirement far away, I have heard two "success stories". The difference being that the owners in the success stories had great references before they shipped the horse to the facility and kept in close contact with the BOs, which included visits when possible.

                                          There are many, many reputable retirement places for horses that are also affordable. I think it would be a disservice to frighten people away from this option.

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