• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Cute ASB with lots of natural knee action!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
  • Original Poster

    #21
    Hmm, well I have a Macbook as well, so I do actually have pretty good software. It isn't that easy to see the chains/straps/whatever on his back legs, if you're not specifically looking you could miss them, which apparently I did at first.

    Calm down, geez.
    come what may

    Rest in peace great mare, 1987-2013

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #22
      Originally posted by Ace View Post
      Well, it's too bad that there does appear to be something at least on the rear pasterns, because to my uneducated eye, it looks like the horse is having a blast. Again, I'm probably wrong, but I wish that *I* had such a good time when I'm out running! (Or at least looked like I was enjoying myself.)
      He really does look like he's having fun, and has lovely movement.
      come what may

      Rest in peace great mare, 1987-2013

      Comment


      • #23
        I think it is a great example of naturally bred movement that is exaggerated with minimal "non injurious" mechanical devices. This is a good example of how a "shoe/pad" limit can be set cause it absolutely shows the horse moving freely at liberty WITHOUT risk of injury by the nailed weighted shoe and pad or the light chain.

        SO it is a good example in my book.

        ANd this is a general question - I hear it more and more in hunter jumper dressage circles where trotting horses of saddle seat persuasion are referred to as "gaited." WHen did this use of the word gaited begin? Has it been common? My farrier uses it to refer to any horse with heavy shoes pads. In my book - "gaited" was only used for a horse that performed a smooth gait - like the rack, amble, running walk etc.

        So i was a little disappointed to see this video was not a smooth gait. But it is a fun trot for sure - I loved when he focused on the man bent down in the corner.

        Just curious about the use of gaited for this horse - this post is not a criticism.
        from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

        Comment


        • #24
          I was expecting a running walk, a flat walk, or a rack.

          This horse has a fun and floaty trot. And if no one objects to Linda Tellington Jones using a couple of Ace bandages to help a horse rediscover his engine and his body, how can you object to a little light chain on a pastern to awaken that boing boing movement on this cute ASB?

          Comment


          • #25
            Interesting, here he is a year later throwing his LF resulting in a very uneven gait. Doesn't even look like the same horse once the rider was added.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZR1fGUDryg

            Comment


            • #26
              Three and Five Gaited.
              Gaited.
              That's what I knew about ASB's before I started to ride them.
              Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
              Incredible Invisible

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #27
                True true, I tend to think of anything with high knee action as "gaited". Off to change the title!

                Sunridge, he is definitely not the horse he was as a 2 yr old in that video. What a shame.

                I think that "gadgets" aren't necessarily evil, but it seems extreme to use them on a 2 yr old IMO. I wouldn't have posted if I saw the chains on his hind legs. He does have lovely natural action though.
                come what may

                Rest in peace great mare, 1987-2013

                Comment


                • #28
                  He does have chains or something around his back pasterns, and at least pads on the front. I would actually bet those front shoes are lightly weighted as well. He seems like a nice boy, but not what I'd call "natural".
                  Caitlin
                  *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
                  http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    If you want to see a naturally gaited horse you have too look at a younger one which has not entered into training, or who is presented by someone who does not use training devices. The exaggerated action is not taught with the little bracelets on the hind legs of this horse but with other aids not pictured in this video.
                    Last edited by HeartsongHorses; Jan. 6, 2013, 02:04 PM. Reason: finish a sentence

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      I'd take him in a heartbeat. He's adorable.

                      You can't put pads and chains on a QH and get that trot. You can't use stretchies or shackles to get it, either. You have to have a rich wellspring of natural talent to start with to get a horse that bounces around like that with a light chain in back.

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        I must say that's one heck of a 2 year old!!
                        "Friend" me !

                        http://www.facebook.com/isabeau.solace

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Originally posted by sunridge1 View Post
                          Interesting, here he is a year later throwing his LF resulting in a very uneven gait. Doesn't even look like the same horse once the rider was added.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZR1fGUDryg
                          sundridge you are so right. I read really quick what you were saying, but didn't pay attention, and clicked and watched for some odd movement and sure enough YOU ARE RIGHT.

                          He *is* throwing the LF. I have seen this MANY MANY TIMES in the TWH show ring and the Racking horse rings. To me, they are lame somewhere and protecting something somewhere on their body. Seen that and it is heartbreaking. After an amount of time in a show ring it gets sadder and sadder as the laps go by. I have seen other performance horse types do the same thing. Not sure the cause, but it is some soreness somewhere.

                          Gee. Somebody who has an eye, perhaps, just like ME. ??? Can't be their computer software, oh NO! You are lying if it is.

                          Oh gee, I bet somebody is going to ignore your post, say it is normal, or say you are "smoking something" since you see something other than what the OP sees.

                          In the video he IS doing exactly what you are saying. Throwing the LF. Sad.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            Originally posted by HeartsongHorses View Post
                            If you want to see a naturally gaited horse you have too look at a younger one which has not entered into training, or who is presented by someone who does not use training devices. The exaggerated action is not taught with the little bracelets on the hind legs of this horse but with other aids not pictured in this video.
                            Have you ever seen a well bred saddlebred move? They don't get that movement from training, they are born with it and training just encourages it. Look at how they move from birth, it's not a man made gait.
                            Here's a random youtube video of a saddle bred weanling
                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOtaVTeGqds
                            .

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Originally posted by rmh_rider View Post
                              sundridge you are so right. I read really quick what you were saying, but didn't pay attention, and clicked and watched for some odd movement and sure enough YOU ARE RIGHT.

                              He *is* throwing the LF. I have seen this MANY MANY TIMES in the TWH show ring and the Racking horse rings. To me, they are lame somewhere and protecting something somewhere on their body. Seen that and it is heartbreaking. After an amount of time in a show ring it gets sadder and sadder as the laps go by. I have seen other performance horse types do the same thing. Not sure the cause, but it is some soreness somewhere.

                              Gee. Somebody who has an eye, perhaps, just like ME. ??? Can't be their computer software, oh NO! You are lying if it is.

                              Oh gee, I bet somebody is going to ignore your post, say it is normal, or say you are "smoking something" since you see something other than what the OP sees.

                              In the video he IS doing exactly what you are saying. Throwing the LF. Sad.
                              I watch the WGCH live streamed every year. A few years ago I was also in a chat with others watching the WGC 5-gaited class. There was a horse who appeared brilliant huge trot with reach, as well as at the rack. He was consistently throwing a front foot. It was so blatantly noticeable to me he looked lame. I commented about it on the chat. They thought I was crazy. They could only see was how high he could go, quality of gait (squareness) didn't matter. It is something I think is far more important than how high. BTW he won the class unanimously.

                              If they aren't square something is amiss, it could as benign as muscle soreness to extreme pain, depends on the horse.

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by Big_Grey_hunter View Post
                                Have you ever seen a well bred saddlebred move? They don't get that movement from training, they are born with it and training just encourages it. Look at how they move from birth, it's not a man made gait.
                                Here's a random youtube video of a saddle bred weanling
                                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOtaVTeGqds
                                That baby has either chains or stretchies on I can't tell. But there is something on those feet.

                                ETA Chains on the front for sure.

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by Big_Grey_hunter View Post
                                  Have you ever seen a well bred saddlebred move? They don't get that movement from training, they are born with it and training just encourages it. Look at how they move from birth, it's not a man made gait.
                                  Here's a random youtube video of a saddle bred weanling
                                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOtaVTeGqds
                                  That was sorta my point. The training encourages it, and makes it bigger. Same thing in any movement based discipline. From WP horses to Arabian Park horses. A horse is born with the movement and ability. But in order to really appreciate their natural movement one should look at the horses before they are "trained".

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by rmh_rider View Post
                                    He *is* throwing the LF. I have seen this MANY MANY TIMES in the TWH show ring and the Racking horse rings. To me, they are lame somewhere and protecting something somewhere on their body. Seen that and it is heartbreaking. After an amount of time in a show ring it gets sadder and sadder as the laps go by. I have seen other performance horse types do the same thing. Not sure the cause, but it is some soreness somewhere.

                                    Gee. Somebody who has an eye, perhaps, just like ME. ??? Can't be their computer software, oh NO! You are lying if it is.

                                    Oh gee, I bet somebody is going to ignore your post, say it is normal, or say you are "smoking something" since you see something other than what the OP sees.

                                    In the video he IS doing exactly what you are saying. Throwing the LF. Sad.
                                    Thowing a leg like that may not have anything to do with lameness or soreness, it may simply be something out of balance in the shoeing. I see this a lot in club footed horses. I have a clubby Morgan that does this and also had a clubby ASB mare that did this as well. The horse appears happy and bright about his work so I don't think there is pain.

                                    Sometimes when you have a clubby horse they do pitch one leg and fold the other leg and when you try to "fix it" with toe weighted shoes or adding a little lead, you may end up screwing up the horse's timing.
                                    Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
                                    Bernard M. Baruch

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #38
                                      Originally posted by rmh_rider View Post
                                      sundridge you are so right. I read really quick what you were saying, but didn't pay attention, and clicked and watched for some odd movement and sure enough YOU ARE RIGHT.

                                      He *is* throwing the LF. I have seen this MANY MANY TIMES in the TWH show ring and the Racking horse rings. To me, they are lame somewhere and protecting something somewhere on their body. Seen that and it is heartbreaking. After an amount of time in a show ring it gets sadder and sadder as the laps go by. I have seen other performance horse types do the same thing. Not sure the cause, but it is some soreness somewhere.

                                      Gee. Somebody who has an eye, perhaps, just like ME. ??? Can't be their computer software, oh NO! You are lying if it is.

                                      Oh gee, I bet somebody is going to ignore your post, say it is normal, or say you are "smoking something" since you see something other than what the OP sees.

                                      In the video he IS doing exactly what you are saying. Throwing the LF. Sad.

                                      Oh rmh, you know me so well! But actually, if you look several posts above your post, you will note that I replied to sunridges post saying what a shame it was that the horse was being ruined. But carry on, I like being the bad guy!
                                      come what may

                                      Rest in peace great mare, 1987-2013

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        I watched several of the videos linked at the beginning of this thread and while I'm trying to appreciate how amazing these ASBs move, it's as difficult to love these results given the "accessories" as it is to love the finished product of horses whose performance is "improved" by various training practices and/or accessories related to their particular breed. The soring in TWH; the trainers who tie heads off to one side for hours on end or tie high so the pleasure horse will peanut roll...

                                        ASBs are such funny, sweet horses. I was never exposed to them until I lived in SC about 13-14 years ago. During that time I was giving lessons to a client who was boarding their h/j at a nationally competitive SB farm while their own barn/fencing was being completed. The youngsters who had not been trained on yet were delightful and bright eyed and beautiful to watch as they played in the pastures. The show horses who lived inside 24/7 were a completely different story. 99% of them wore cribbing collars and pinned their ears when someone/anyone walked by their stalls. Their feet were shod incredibly long/tall and they wore the tail set harness thingies. The BO explained that b/c of the shoeing and tail situation the horses had to stay in their stalls all the time. She went on to explain the nicking/tendon cutting thing, as well. It was an afternoon of overwhelming education. I knew about TW soreing, etc. but just hadn't ever had any exposure to ASBs. This woman was very well thought of and admired in ASB industry and she was very proud of her horses and stallion as they had won daggum everything.

                                        I know bad things happen in every breed but I just don't understand why folks can't love how naturally beautiful and talented their horses are without having to try and make things better. I can't imagine keeping the animals I love the way those nationally winning ASBs I met were kept. Just makes me so sad to remember how unhappy those horses were - especially compared to how wonderfully sweet they seemed to be before they were trained to be winners.

                                        Zipping by Versace flame suit...

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Originally posted by Big_Grey_hunter View Post
                                          Have you ever seen a well bred saddlebred move? They don't get that movement from training, they are born with it and training just encourages it. Look at how they move from birth, it's not a man made gait.
                                          Here's a random youtube video of a saddle bred weanling
                                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOtaVTeGqds
                                          If this is what a good moving SB looks like, why can't SB folks be happy enough with that? It looks natural and beautiful.

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X