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Got screwed by a former trainer, now what do I do?

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  • #81
    Originally posted by analise View Post
    From what I've read, it's not that the OP is angry that the horse grew to be taller than what the trainer told her it would be.

    It's that the breeder told the trainer it would top out at around 17.1 because the trainer told the breeder OP wanted a tall horse when OP emphatically did not and then trainer turned around and told OP that the breeder said horse would grow to be within OP's desired size range. I would be upset too, if I found this out, whether or not you can predict a horse's final height at whatever age, it doesn't change that, according to the OP, the trainer blatantly finagled facts so that OP would buy this horse instead of one that suits her better since size seems to be such a sticking point.

    OP has also said that at the time she really trusted trainer, and presumably really wanted a horse from this breeder's program and was thus willing to go along with what trainer said in order to get a nice horse from the breeder. She's not the first person to let a trainer determine how their 'horse life' is run and she won't be the last and it sounds like she's also learned her lesson in that respect.
    I would not be willing to be that angry with someone over what was an every day type conversation (for a breeder and trainer) that happened four years ago.
    Not that I think the breeder is not being honest but I see no reason to have this much hate over something that the breeder may or may not be remember right.

    Comment


    • #82
      My question to the OP is - what exactly are you wanting from us? Just to vent about the situation, or offer possible alternatives, or...?

      Comment


      • #83
        Originally posted by analise View Post
        From what I've read, it's not that the OP is angry that the horse grew to be taller than what the trainer told her it would be.

        It's that the breeder told the trainer it would top out at around 17.1 because the trainer told the breeder OP wanted a tall horse when OP emphatically did not and then trainer turned around and told OP that the breeder said horse would grow to be within OP's desired size range. I would be upset too, if I found this out, whether or not you can predict a horse's final height at whatever age, it doesn't change that, according to the OP, the trainer blatantly finagled facts so that OP would buy this horse instead of one that suits her better since size seems to be such a sticking point.

        OP has also said that at the time she really trusted trainer, and presumably really wanted a horse from this breeder's program and was thus willing to go along with what trainer said in order to get a nice horse from the breeder. She's not the first person to let a trainer determine how their 'horse life' is run and she won't be the last and it sounds like she's also learned her lesson in that respect.
        Unless she just fell off the turnip truck... she bought a 15.2 yearling on a representation that it would only grow at most 3 more inches. Calling it a "misrperesentation" by the seller assumes it's not such a silly representation that no knowledgeable human would rely on it. It strains my belief that anyone with any horse knowledge would think a horse had only a few more inches of growth in it at age 1!
        ~Veronica
        "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
        http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/

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        • #84
          OH GOOD GRIEF, OP!!

          First of all, you were not "screwed" by a former trainer. I have been "screwed" and so have many others here. When you get "screwed" by a trainer, you SURE don't end up with a nice, fancy, rideable horse that is amateur friendly and easy to sell. You usually end up with something unsound in body and/or mind and/or you lose a boatload of money in some kind of fraudulent scheme. So quit whining. REALLY. Quit it.

          Second, the horse was 15.2 AS A LONG YEARLING!?!?!? And you really believed this was going to be a small horse in the end? If you believed that, then I have a bridge I would like to sell to you. My TB was 15.2 coming off the track as a THREE year old. He is over 16 hands now (have not sticked him since he finished growing around age 5-6). Warmbloods grow even longer than TBs, usually. Surely you could not possibly think that a 15.2 long yearling was going to definitely stop at 16.2. That is just...WHAT?!??!

          Either ride and enjoy what sounds like a lovely horse, or sell him to someone who will appreciate what sounds like a fantastic animal. And stop overreacting.

          Comment


          • #85
            Horse is too tall and makes you feel uncomfortable? Sell him and get something shorter.

            All the rest is just fluff and very old water under the bridge. It's been 4 years, and is now ancient history.

            I got JJ when he was 5 y/o and 15.2 h. He grew another .1 h in the next year, so now I have a 15.3 h horse. That's a LOT taller than I'm used to, but I don't feel uncomfortable on him. Should I have been angry that he didn't stay 15.2 h?
            Homeopathy claims water can cure you since it once held medicine. That's like saying you can get sustenance from an empty plate because it once held food.

            Comment


            • #86
              OP, I understand your frustration, but honestly, you just sound bratty.

              Some people I know (myself included!) would Kill for a horse like yours. Or, hell, any horse at all.

              If this is the worst thing you've got going on in your life, thank your lucky stars and then get over it.

              The truth is, it sounds like you just don't like him and are looking for others to blame to make yourself feel better.
              Barn rat for life

              Comment


              • #87
                There is no way I could make statements like "take him to the glue factory" or "cut off his head" about a horse I had for years - even in jest. You sound very angry at HIM, too, but I bet you're really just scared of riding him.

                I bought a green horse that was more horse than I was used to and he frightened me. I didn't like riding him but I finally sucked it up and learned how. He taught me a lot. He could still be a pill in certain situations even right before I retired him YEARS later, but once I learned how to ride him he didn't scare me anymore.

                It sounds like you let your trainer make all the decisions for you and you just forked over a check. Lesson here is that you need to take more responsibility instead of blindly following someone else. No way in h*ll would I write a check for a horse if I'd never even spoken to the breeder - I don't care what any trainer tells me.

                Stop being a drama llama.
                "Dogs are man's best friend. Cats are man's adorable little serial killer." -- theoatmeal.com

                Comment


                • #88
                  I bought a gelding at 16 months of age.
                  His mom was 16.1.
                  His dad was 17.1.
                  So I should have ended up with a horse that was about 16.3 to 17hands at the most, right?
                  I sold him as a 4 1/2 year old when he was 17.3. Realistically he still had a year or two of growing to do.
                  He was sweet, kind and trained the way I wanted him.
                  Why would I ever sell a horse like this?
                  I am 5'1". I couldn't get back on him if I fell off without a ladder.
                  Here's a pic of his handsomeness.
                  Click image for larger version

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                  ~Rest in Peace Woody...1975-2008~

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                  • #89
                    Originally posted by FineAlready View Post
                    OH GOOD GRIEF, OP!!

                    First of all, you were not "screwed" by a former trainer. I have been "screwed" and so have many others here. When you get "screwed" by a trainer, you SURE don't end up with a nice, fancy, rideable horse that is amateur friendly and easy to sell. You usually end up with something unsound in body and/or mind and/or you lose a boatload of money in some kind of fraudulent scheme. So quit whining. REALLY. Quit it.

                    Second, the horse was 15.2 AS A LONG YEARLING!?!?!? And you really believed this was going to be a small horse in the end? If you believed that, then I have a bridge I would like to sell to you. My TB was 15.2 coming off the track as a THREE year old. He is over 16 hands now (have not sticked him since he finished growing around age 5-6). Warmbloods grow even longer than TBs, usually. Surely you could not possibly think that a 15.2 long yearling was going to definitely stop at 16.2. That is just...WHAT?!??!

                    Either ride and enjoy what sounds like a lovely horse, or sell him to someone who will appreciate what sounds like a fantastic animal. And stop overreacting.
                    ^^^^ This ^^^^^^

                    I don't understand why you think you can't sell him and buy something just as nice? Larger tend to have more $$ added on and you want a smaller horse. This right here has lost me.

                    What is his breed and how did the trainer lie to you about that?

                    I want to see a picture of him
                    Draumr Hesta Farm
                    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"
                    Member of the COTH Ignorant Disrepectful F-bombs!*- 2Dogs Farm

                    Comment


                    • #90
                      Originally posted by kari View Post
                      I bought a gelding at 16 months of age.
                      His mom was 16.1.
                      His dad was 17.1.
                      So I should have ended up with a horse that was about 16.3 to 17hands at the most, right?
                      I sold him as a 4 1/2 year old when he was 17.3. Realistically he still had a year or two of growing to do.
                      He was sweet, kind and trained the way I wanted him.
                      Why would I ever sell a horse like this?
                      I am 5'1". I couldn't get back on him if I fell off without a ladder.
                      Here's a pic of his handsomeness.
                      [ATTACH=CONFIG]37462[/ATTACH]
                      Thelwell goodness!
                      Originally posted by BigMama1
                      Facts don't have versions. If they do, they are opinions
                      GNU Terry Prachett

                      Comment


                      • #91
                        Originally posted by wcporter View Post
                        OP, I understand your frustration, but honestly, you just sound bratty.

                        Some people I know (myself included!) would Kill for a horse like yours. Or, hell, any horse at all.

                        If this is the worst thing you've got going on in your life, thank your lucky stars and then get over it.

                        The truth is, it sounds like you just don't like him and are looking for others to blame to make yourself feel better.
                        OP, I don't think you sound bratty at all. You sound frustrated and sarcastically furious. My take is that you've been struggling with a horse that's not what you expected size-wise for years and now you find out that your ownership of this oversized beast is due to your trainer blatantly lying to you. Not sure why everyone's jumping on your case here. Sounds like the straw that broke the camel's back. You have a right to be mad at your trainer/agent. The post telling you to be happy your trainer lied to you for your own good because bigger horses are worth more is dumb. Unfortunately, there's nothing you can do vis a vis the trainer at this point. You have learned an important lesson-don't trust anyone in the horse world.

                        What you can and should do, particularly if the horse is as nice as you say he is, is sell him and buy yourself a smaller horse who is comfortable to ride. I agree that it will likely be cheaper.

                        What I really disagree with is the posters who tell you to suck it up and learn to ride him. You sound like someone who does a lot of her own leg work and training but not a professional hwo makes a living doing this. Riding a made horse that's too big for you is way different than bringing along an oversized green horse who is challenging your balance and aids.

                        Also, it sounds like this is your only horse-why would you want to own a personal horse that you hate riding. What's the point? I really can't see the purpose of people urging someone like you to keep at it with a horse that's too big. A 17.1 hand and growing warmblood is very large for someone of your size to train and bring along. There is a value to proportionality between horse and rider. The people telling you that size is irrelevant and everyone should be able to ride a very large horse must either be (1) very talented professional riders, 2) taller than 5'3 or (3) only ride made horses with trainer tune ups.
                        Good luck.

                        ETA-Alagirl, at first I couldn't tell there was a rider sitting on that horse. Wow. Lovely horse, but are you sure he's not bigger than 17'3 already in that photo?

                        Comment


                        • #92
                          OP, I don't like you. That's all. Carry on.

                          Comment


                          • #93
                            The people telling you that size is irrelevant and everyone should be able to ride a very large horse must either be (1) very talented professional riders, 2) taller than 5'3 or (3) only ride made horses with trainer tune ups.
                            Good luck.
                            I'm fairly sure I'm not #1. I am #2, but I've dealt with horses that were physically unsuitable for a number of different reasons, and I've never been lucky enough to be #3.

                            I've bought quite a few horses over my years, and if I had a horse whose only flaw was that he was too tall, I'd count my gracious lucky stars and go find a big step stool. I'd do the same if I had one that was too small.

                            Perhaps I've just had the crappiest horse luck ever (I don't think I have) but not a single one of the animals I've ever owned wasn't a. partially misrepresented in some way b. didn't have quirks that at one point or another made me say "I have to sell this horse!!!" or c. didn't make me uncomfortable in one way or another.

                            I have never spoken about suing a former trainer, not even in jest.

                            And though I HAVE said jokingly to a horse that I would perhaps send him to the Amish if he did not behave, I think that's a different beast entirely.

                            But here are your options:

                            1) Learn to ride said beast.

                            2) Sell him and move on.

                            Those of us who are saying maybe #1 is an option are saying that we've had enough equine experience to know that a solid sane temperament, with a heart of gold, is really really worth so much more than a horse who is 3" too tall is an inconvenience.

                            Comment


                            • #94
                              Those of us who are saying maybe #1 is an option are saying that we've had enough equine experience to know that a solid sane temperament, with a heart of gold, is really really worth so much more than a horse who is 3" too tall is an inconvenience.[/QUOTE]

                              It doesn't sound like he's just too tall, it sounds like he's also too long, too wide, too strong, and basically just all around too big for the OP given that he also sounds somewhat opinionated and he's green and she's small.

                              That sounds more than "inconvenient" to me. And given that he sounds talented and he's well started, sell him and buy something you enjoy. Life's too short.

                              The people who are telling the OP to "learn to ride him" are doing her a disservice. It sounds like she knows how to ride him and doesn't enjoy it at all. To tell her to suck it up and keep struggling as some sort of punishment for being dumb enough to trust a trainer, not talk to the purchaser and believe that height is predictible is kind of mean.

                              Comment


                              • #95
                                Originally posted by NCRider View Post
                                ETA-Alagirl, at first I couldn't tell there was a rider sitting on that horse. Wow. Lovely horse, but are you sure he's not bigger than 17'3 already in that photo?
                                He was mine. He was actually 17.2 in that pic, about 6 months before I sold him. He was in training at the time, and let me tell you, i was realllly far off the ground. He was a loffly guy, full Percheron, in case you were wondering.
                                ~Rest in Peace Woody...1975-2008~

                                Comment


                                • #96
                                  Originally posted by kari View Post
                                  He was mine. He was actually 17.2 in that pic, about 6 months before I sold him. He was in training at the time, and let me tell you, i was realllly far off the ground. He was a loffly guy, full Percheron, in case you were wondering.
                                  Sorry Kari, I got confused about the posters. He looks beautiful in that picture. I bet he was fun and scary to ride all at the same time. Did you ever get dizzy looking down

                                  Comment


                                  • #97
                                    She said she was uncomfortable, not scared. She said that she had trouble packaging him, not that he was carting her off to lands unknown.

                                    Her main focus was on the fact that he grew too tall.

                                    Would she have been equally talking about suing if she had a horse with a long stride? Or a horse that was slightly too strong but otherwise was golden?

                                    She said "uncomfortable" not "deathly afraid of" and for a person who is otherwise prone to exaggeration (see the rest of her posts) I think she's luckier than she (or you, obviously) knows.

                                    Comment


                                    • #98
                                      Originally posted by NCRider View Post
                                      Sorry Kari, I got confused about the posters. He looks beautiful in that picture. I bet he was fun and scary to ride all at the same time. Did you ever get dizzy looking down
                                      Nope, never dizzy, I just didn't look down!
                                      He was a blast, but I could NOT get on him without a really large mounting block or a tailgate! I still miss him!
                                      ~Rest in Peace Woody...1975-2008~

                                      Comment


                                      • #99
                                        It's sucky that the trainer lied to you, but to quote an old lawyer friend of mine, "Hey, you F'd up; you trusted me." I've never understood why people think if they have a trainer it means they give up all responsibility and the brain cells god gave them.

                                        But that's water under the bridge. Either a) you love this horse, or b) you don't. If a) then learn to ride him. If b) then sell him and buy something in your size comfort zone. There's no shame in selling a horse that doesn't suit you. There's humiliation in giving total trust to someone who doesn't deserve it AND NOBODY deserves your mindless trust.
                                        ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
                                        Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

                                        "Life is merrier with a terrier!"

                                        Comment


                                        • One more additional thought -

                                          If she had said "this horse is too much for me", not a one of us would have said keep him.

                                          But she did not say that. Not once. In fact, he's been so nice that she did 95% of the leg work herself.

                                          Her problem was the fact that she found out that the trainer allegedly lied about the horse's height.

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