• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Has "beginner safe", "bombproof", "husband horse" changed???

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    Originally posted by meaty ogre View Post
    - Look for a "granny" horse. Tell them you are bringing your beloved 80 year old grandmother with arthritis and 2 hip replacements. Tell them the horse is for her, she means more to you than anything in the world and the horse has to be perfectly suited for her. I am dead serious. Just say this to the seller and be amazed at all the "disclosures" that wouldn't have happened if you were looking for a "kids" or "husbands" horse!

    Good luck!
    That's perfect advice!

    Comment


    • #22
      I have the opposite problem. I have a wonderful horse that is all those things, but the people that call are nuts. They are either put off because he isn't fancy. If he doesn't kill your spouse, does it matter? And they also want him to have fox hunted, evented, shown, jumped, gone to the Olympics, etc. for $$$$. Once again, if he doesn't kill your spouse, does it matter? I am so over it that I just took him off the market.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #23
        Originally posted by meaty ogre View Post
        Rebmik, I can't tell you how many I've seen advertised as bomproof/beginner/husband horses. Honestly I think it's more rare to see one listed for sale without those attributes, though we all know that those attributes are relatively rare. It is frustrating.

        I started looking for such a horse several years ago. I had a low budget so I started looking mostly at backyard horses. The owners were so uneducated they didn't know what they had. At first I was angry about wasting my time, but honestly, if a person doesn't know that their bit is in backwards, they probably don't know their horse isn't trained.

        So I upped my budget and started looking at horses in "professional" barns. Sadly it wasn't much better.

        The truth of the matter is that horses like this get passed on to friends, family members, or other people in the same barns/circles. They are hard to find, and when somebody comes across one, they keep him/her. My bombproof/husband horse was actually given to me when he couldn't stand up to the rigors of lesson work any more. He had a few kinks to iron out but I'm so lucky to have gotten him.

        Here are my tips:

        -Don't look for a "kids" horse. Kids are brave and/or stupid. Brave kids will ride anything. So will stupid ones. Just because a horse has been ridden by kids does not mean it is suitable for one! Also, many horse sellers live by the saying that God watches over fools and children. Just look at some sales ads to see what I mean!

        -To most people, husband horse means one or more of the following:
        a) It's big...can probably carry a man
        b) It's too strong for a lady...probably pull her arms out of socket!
        c) Based on the same premise that most men won't stop and ask for directions, let's dump the horse on some man whose macho-ness won't allow him to admit that he can't manage to ride the horse.

        - Look for a "granny" horse. Tell them you are bringing your beloved 80 year old grandmother with arthritis and 2 hip replacements. Tell them the horse is for her, she means more to you than anything in the world and the horse has to be perfectly suited for her. I am dead serious. Just say this to the seller and be amazed at all the "disclosures" that wouldn't have happened if you were looking for a "kids" or "husbands" horse!


        Good luck!
        That is exactly what I was thinkingk, but my "Granny" was also going to be "blind"!!!!

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by craz4crtrs View Post
          Ask farriers, a lot of people have lovely horses in their backyards that aren't being advertised. Maybe a lease option on a horse that really isn't "for sale" but isn't being used. Once the horse is off the property and works for you, buy it.
          Ditto that! My farrier always knows of various types of horses for sale or long-term lease, many retired performance horses, been-there-done-that steady types, who would love a life of ease, earning their keep with just the occasional meander down a pleasant trail. Your vet, too, may know of some saints available to the right situation. Maybe there is an old soldier nearby who can't serve his owner's needs anymore, but is serviceably sound with a little TLC and would fit the bill for hubby perfectly.

          Some of these may not be advertised except by this sort of word of mouth. If I were interested in placing one of mine with a nice family, that is what I would do ... just spread the word via the pros that I trust who could give personal recommendations.
          Equinox Equine Massage

          In the depth of winter, I finally learned that there was in me invincible summer.
          -Albert Camus

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by SquishTheBunny View Post
            " I think this definition needs to be changed to servicibly sound. A horse that can not tolerate jumping or higher level dressage work may be suitable for YEARS AND YEARS as a trail horse.

            My ancient horse had arthritis in his hocks, to the point where he could no longer be a high level hunter. But, with proper management he was a stunning horse for flatwork and VET recommended as it was better to keep him going. He was not "in pain" at all, as soon as he became uncomfortable he was fully retired at the ripe old age of 28 (not bad for a TB!)
            I agree 100%, Squish! My senior citizen mare is not truly "sound" in the way that a dressage horse must be sound ... arthritis has stiffened her joints and an old injury have given her a hitch in her getalong that is a permanent mechanical lameness. It is very slight, it is not painful (determined via extensive blocking by two vets!), and it does not hinder her being a lovely pleasure horse and occasional beginner lesson horse. In fact, she frets, eats poorly and doesn't do well at all when "retired." She is perky, shiny, engaged and happy with her part-time, post-retirement "career." And several vets -- including one nationally renowned lameness expert -- agree that the consistent work has improved her arthritis and overall comfort level.

            If I couldn't keep her for some reason, I would be looking for a home like the OP's, where she could be a beloved family pet with an easily doable job.
            Equinox Equine Massage

            In the depth of winter, I finally learned that there was in me invincible summer.
            -Albert Camus

            Comment


            • #26
              I have the exact opposite problem- I have the bombproof kid and hubby safe horse that is reasonably priced, sound, sane and available. and I can not get her sold,lol.... I had a family here this weekend with 3 kids betwen 7 and 11, and they roe her in their tack, my tack, bareback, double, single, all gaits up and down our hills, all over the place- rode her along the fenceline by my stallion- and she ignored him even though she is in heat, my hubby was running chainsaws an cutting wood, my son and one of the kids were racing aroun all over the place, and the mare was a total gem the whole time- did everything asked of her an they were here for over 2 hours....but now they needto talk to the trainer, and they want to come again next weekend to ride her again,lol..... not to mention i have multiple videos and photos i have sent out on her- I just think alot of people are nuts.

              Comment


              • #27
                Originally posted by Luckydonkey View Post
                I have the exact opposite problem- I have the bombproof kid and hubby safe horse that is reasonably priced, sound, sane and available. and I can not get her sold,lol.... I had a family here this weekend with 3 kids betwen 7 and 11, and they roe her in their tack, my tack, bareback, double, single, all gaits up and down our hills, all over the place- rode her along the fenceline by my stallion- and she ignored him even though she is in heat, my hubby was running chainsaws an cutting wood, my son and one of the kids were racing aroun all over the place, and the mare was a total gem the whole time- did everything asked of her an they were here for over 2 hours....but now they needto talk to the trainer, and they want to come again next weekend to ride her again,lol..... not to mention i have multiple videos and photos i have sent out on her- I just think alot of people are nuts.
                AGREED!!!!

                I had the woman who was so excited to some and see mine that she came to my house in 4 inch heels. She forgot her barn boots. She went on and on about how she knew he was the one and told me her huge sob story about her Dutch horse that was too much handle. She sold him and was devastated. She had to finally admit to herself that she is a timid beginner. Well, that's fine. My horse thrives with timid beginners.

                She wanted to give me cash on the spot. She was driving a brand new mercedes convertable sports car, so I figured she was serious. But I wanted to make sure that she was actually the right person, despite her quirks. She came and rode him and brought an experienced friend. He was a SAINT. And she burst in to tears after she rode him telling me that he was the most wonderful and kind horse she ever sat on. The friend supposedly loved him.

                And then she disappeared. Yep. Her friend wanted her to try a few more horses, just to be sure. She had called me whispering from the barn that "none of them are as nice as your horse". Even so- disappeared. Never returned an email. Never returned a call.

                That is why I am keeping him. I am so over stupid people.

                Comment


                • #28
                  We lucked out - went to an auction to look for a hubby horse.

                  I had a mare in mind that I saw in the catalog - while my husband had his eye on a 3 yr old draft cross - I had my eye on a 9 yr old draft cross mare.

                  The 3 yr old came out - wide eyed, unbroken and very up. My husband agreed that was not the horse for him and wanted to leave - I said lets wait and see this mare I had my eye on when we were browsing.


                  She came out with two girls riding her double bareback, then they threw on a saddle - I saw this sad look in her eye but a sweetheart underneath.

                  I outbid the meat man for her and we brought her home for 1400. Best money I ever spent.

                  While she has a capped hock - no lameness, no health issues, no vices and she is an absolute sweetheart. She never causes any problems, is a great weaning partner. My husband absolutely loves her - she has taught him to be patient - she was a little abused - but she looks after him so well - whenever he looses his balance she stops, she stands for mounting, dismounting. She has also taught him to be very light handed.

                  she can be ridden once a month, once a week or whatever - doesn't worry about cars or anything and will go when asked.

                  I wouldn't sell her for the world.

                  here is a link to some pics of them playing hide and seek.

                  www.hotelfun4kids.com/horses2.htm

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Wow! Lacey is BIG and GORGEOUS!

                    I play hide-and-seek with King, too. Elijah doesn't seem to "get it," though. He gets his feelings hurt if you hide from him! King understands that if you "find the kid," there are cookies involved. He loves the game. But poor ole Eli is just too tender hearted. What? Why would you HIDE from me?

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      My best horses have come via word of mouth but ditto the advice to put the word out w/ farriers and vets. Also, take your search into the western world. A nice "been there, done that" former roping horse can be one heck of a good horse.

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        There have been a few threads here about ranches that train trail horses and family horses. Videos of them dragging tarps around bareback in the snow and that kind of thing. That is where I'd look.

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          So I was writing an ad today for a horse who truly is a beginner's horse/bombproof (at least, as much as any horse ever is)/etc - and I was thinking of this thread going, "But how do I write it so that people know that I'M telling the TRUTH?"

                          The stupid liars out there just make it so much harder for the rest of us!
                          Proud member of the EDRF

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            Originally posted by Just My Style View Post
                            AGREED!!!!

                            I had the woman who was so excited to some and see mine that she came to my house in 4 inch heels. She forgot her barn boots. She went on and on about how she knew he was the one and told me her huge sob story about her Dutch horse that was too much handle. She sold him and was devastated. She had to finally admit to herself that she is a timid beginner. Well, that's fine. My horse thrives with timid beginners.

                            She wanted to give me cash on the spot. She was driving a brand new mercedes convertable sports car, so I figured she was serious. But I wanted to make sure that she was actually the right person, despite her quirks. She came and rode him and brought an experienced friend. He was a SAINT. And she burst in to tears after she rode him telling me that he was the most wonderful and kind horse she ever sat on. The friend supposedly loved him.

                            And then she disappeared. Yep. Her friend wanted her to try a few more horses, just to be sure. She had called me whispering from the barn that "none of them are as nice as your horse". Even so- disappeared. Never returned an email. Never returned a call.

                            That is why I am keeping him. I am so over stupid people.
                            they come for free rides as ut cheaper mecedes or not its an easy trip out and easy to have a ride rather than pay for a lesson

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              op-- dont look for boomproof look fo a horse that novice ride
                              and llearn to read between the lines of the seller, or ask open questions

                              ie - wha type of bit is trhe horse ridden in-- is a clue
                              for exsample if the answer a snaffle mouth then thats a clue that the horse has a soft mouth
                              same to with what type of bridle does the horse ride in
                              flashes ,crackles , figures of eight - could be a strong horse , threfore not a novice ride
                              same to with martigales
                              if ahorse is a snaffle mouth a proper snaffle mouth then yu shouldnt need xtra attachments

                              also ask whats it like to be cuaght is another clue
                              ie good to catch, ( if seeing a horse then you want to be able to catch it yourself you do not want to see it already caught up and tacked up wny becuase if you catch the horse then its ens right there no point bring a novice rider if they cnat catch the horse as they are novice at handling they want something they can catch, that will stand and be tacked by them and mounted with ease

                              make sure your looking at ahorse for the correct weight of the rider

                              ask about the feed-- thats also agood indicator of -- how the horse goes
                              type would make her quicker faster and hard to hold

                              ask your farriers vets and llocal tack shops as they are more than likely to know of a decent horse around the corner
                              some horses are in peoples livery yards that dont have proffesional help and some are not


                              the few exsamples a re questions that have reponses of what the horse will be like and you cut them out beofre you look and waste your time

                              an advert for a novice should be good temprement, easy to do and handle, doesnt buck rear or bolt good to load shoe clip, and is a novice ride good in traffic, that can vary from good to 100% with trafic vets and farriers,

                              if you looking for a weight carring horse such as an irish co type or gypsy vanner its well known here that they can be stubborn, and slow but they are also strong willied
                              and the common cob is like buying a cup of tea in a cafe we have that many of them here

                              we have the really cheap ones to the more expensive type the cheaper ones as with anything the less you pay the less you get
                              ie edcuation or issues be it health or attitude
                              always get a ppe done might cost a bit but will save you heaps in the long run
                              and always do it regardless of price of horse
                              also when buying if the horse is at another yard and to be trnasported to you always insure the horse from day one

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by Just My Style View Post
                                I have the opposite problem. I have a wonderful horse that is all those things, but the people that call are nuts. They are either put off because he isn't fancy. If he doesn't kill your spouse, does it matter? And they also want him to have fox hunted, evented, shown, jumped, gone to the Olympics, etc. for $$$$. Once again, if he doesn't kill your spouse, does it matter? I am so over it that I just took him off the market.
                                I had this argument with someone the other day. I was horseshopping with a friend, this is to be her first horse. She has been riding for 2 years and feels ready to take the plunge. I'm looking around for her, trying to find something in her budget that is safe, sane and sound. The only thing she cares about is that it is tobino and big!! HAVE I TAUGHT HER NOTHING!!!

                                first and foremost you need to be able to live with them. If you can't stand them whats the point?! Extensive training is great, bonus, but if this is going to be a trail horse does it really need to know advanced dressage? W/T/C w/ leads, voice commands are handy, and exceptional manners are a must.

                                They need to be sane, not freaking at everything. They need to be steady, constant but responsive. And they need to be forgiving of the mistakes that thier riders make.

                                I think it comes down to training. People forget that the average rider is just that, average. They want an animal that they can put anyone on and KNOW that they are safe.
                                Riding the winds of change

                                Heeling NRG Aussies
                                Like us on facebook!

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  you might want to get in touch with sunkissacres, mayS or fat palomino
                                  on here they are rescue centres tha post often they have plenty of horses needing homes
                                  and one just might be suitable for your husband
                                  they are reputabe cother's thats waht i would do, they would only be to pleased to ave a cother have one of there horses and besides you letting up a space to let them save another one
                                  and if transport a problem normally cothers stick together and do a trip thing to get horse from a- to b

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by Luckydonkey View Post
                                    I have the exact opposite problem.... I had a family here this weekend with 3 kids betwen 7 and 11, and they roe her in their tack, my tack, bareback, double, single, all gaits up and down our hills, all over the place- my son and one of the kids were racing aroun all over the place, and the mare was a total gem the whole time- did everything asked of her an they were here for over 2 hours....but now they needto talk to the trainer, and they want to come again next weekend to ride her again,lol..... I just think alot of people are nuts.
                                    I think that family thinks they've found a great place to take the kids to have some FREE fun on someone else's horse.

                                    If they do show up again, I'd limit their test riding to 30 minutes, tops. Then that's it, decision time for them - no more free rides.
                                    Equus Keepus Brokus

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Rebmik,

                                      Here's a nice-sounding mare at Gentle Giants Draft Horse rescue in Maryland:
                                      http://www.gentlegiantsdrafthorseres...0Vivienne.html

                                      Equus Keepus Brokus

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        I loved Lacey. I think she is absolutely adorable.

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Originally posted by goeslikestink View Post
                                          they come for free rides as ut cheaper mecedes or not its an easy trip out and easy to have a ride rather than pay for a lesson
                                          Exactly. That is why when she wanted to take the horse to her place to try, I said "no". I told her that there was too much risk involved with her trailering him and taking him to a strange place unless she was more certain that he was the one. I offered for her to come back to my place and spend as much time as she wanted with him. If she was positive after that, then I would take a deposit, allow him to visit her barn and be vetted there. Never heard from her again. Sorry, but I don't think I was unreasonable. Excuse me for being protective of the horse and not allowing him to just hop on a trailer and go off with someone.

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X