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As Hay Prices Skyrocket, Ohio Horseowners Giving Up Horses

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  • As Hay Prices Skyrocket, Ohio Horseowners Giving Up Horses

    More stories like this to come. As the article says, does your kid go to the dentist or does your horse get fed?

    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stor...ices-soar.html

    Excerpt:

    Danny Hall’s quarter horse, Flash, is more than just livestock. He’s a companion.

    But hay crops have not fared well during the dry, hot summer, and skyrocketing prices have compelled Hall to make a tough decision. The 50-year-old resident of Millersport, in Fairfield County, is searching for a new home for Flash, and will give the horse to anyone who is a good fit.

    “We just can’t afford to keep him anymore,” said Hall, who works at Nationwide in Columbus.

    He and his family are sad at the prospect of saying goodbye to the 25-year-old horse they acquired in 2008. “He’s just a wonderful old soul,” Hall said.

    Hall used to be able to get a round bale of hay for as little as $12, but now that price has risen to as much as $60, he said. He’s able to find round bales for $35 if he looks hard enough.
    "No matter how well you perform there's always somebody of intelligent opinion who thinks it's lousy." - Laurence Olivier

  • #2
    So for one horse he will probably go through 1 round bale a month. Look harder and find that round bale for $35. Or pay $60 a month to feed the 25 year old horse that it seems like you are just looking to dump because he is old and useless now. Sorry, vent over.
    Derby Lyn Farms Website

    Derby Lyn Farms on Facebook!

    Comment


    • #3
      Really, at 25, its probably better just to put him down rather than send him to an uncertain future. The way the horse market is today, even young horses are having trouble selling.
      I'm a second hand Vegan. Cows eat grass. I eat cows.

      Comment


      • #4
        If you want to be depressed you can read the August sale report from one of the larger auctions in my region: http://sdhorsesales.com/acrofiles/topsaug.pdf

        I was "wow" at the top prices, but then I got horrified when I read about the loose horses....UGH.

        I did a little search and found roundbales for much less than they were quoting however, I assume their figures were used to possible excuse the bad auction prices??

        With regards to the OP, yes, it sounds like it might not be a bad idea to put him down.
        DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          I agree that if they can't afford him, do right by him and put him down. I do think we're at the point of needing to be self-limiting when it comes to horses and really think about selective euthanasia as being for the greater good. I do feel that we need to reduce the population of horses as a whole and putting down horses who are ill, unwanted, unrideable and unsafe will be a benefit to us all.

          Prices are driven by supply and demand. Supply is what it is and each horse produces it's own demand for hay and grain. By reducing the overall demand for product, prices *should* reduce as well. (I say should only because of other industries using corn - such as ethanol production). I really wish people would keep this thought in the back of their mind when they start to think about breeding that crappy grade mare. Another foal equals another mouth which drives up demand and prices of an already limited supply.

          Comment


          • #6
            Unfortunately if he can't afford hay I'm sure the cost of putting the horse down will really be an eye opener. That would be the best way to say goodbye to his companion.
            1. Bozone (n.): The substance surrounding stupid people that stops bright ideas from penetrating. The bozone layer, unfortunately, shows little sign of breaking down in the near future.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post
              If you want to be depressed you can read the August sale report from one of the larger auctions in my region: http://sdhorsesales.com/acrofiles/topsaug.pdf

              I was "wow" at the top prices, but then I got horrified when I read about the loose horses....UGH.

              I did a little search and found roundbales for much less than they were quoting however, I assume their figures were used to possible excuse the bad auction prices??

              With regards to the OP, yes, it sounds like it might not be a bad idea to put him down.
              Depressing is right:

              LOOSE HORSE SALE – Sold 200 head. Market lower due to large movement of horses with
              the drought and that high price feed that the plants are forced to buy to feed the Hold Over horses
              and for those lighter weight horses that need to go to feed lots before able to be processed.
              Note on Culled Stallions- PLEASE geld those culled stallions before bringing to the market
              to receive more than $50 for them. Mexico does NOT allow stallions to cross the border and
              Canada has very strict & expensive rules on shipping of stallions to them.
              Reminder - We can not accept extremely thin, deformed, blind or horses that can not travel on
              all 3 legs. Sorry, we can not accept thinner stallions. $125 Fee for No Value horses left on
              the premises. We are here the day prior to the sale accepting loose horses for the next days sale.
              I want a signature but I have nothing original to say except: "STHU and RIDE!!!

              Wonderful COTHER's I've met: belleellis, stefffic, snkstacres and janedoe726.

              Comment


              • #8
                Derby Lyn Farms I agree. Or Euth. Do not give away the 25 yr old horse

                Comment


                • #9
                  Notice that the has five horses, but is getting rid of the 25 year old.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    - We can not accept extremely thin, deformed, blind or horses that can not travel on
                    all 3 legs

                    HUH, i thought they weren't "supposed" to ship lame horses
                    I wasn't always a Smurf
                    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
                    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
                    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Cripes, we've been paying $50-60 for a round bale for years now in our area. I'd love to find it for $35. Generally we have to ship hay in but even locally grown horse quality hay is about that much. They know they have us by the soft parts so they can charge what they want and get it. I've said for years that the cost of keeping horses here in Tidewater VA is higher than many other places in the US. So few local farmers put up hay while commodity crops are so much more profitable...corn, soy, peanuts and cotton are the main crops.

                      I've seriously considered converting some of my pasture to hay fields.

                      I spoke to my hay guy in Northern NY a few weeks ago and he said that the trend in his region which has been known for excellent hay forever is now to till up the hay fields and plant corn and soy. He said more and more they are doing that even though his region is marginal for those crops. Crop insurance makes it less risky.

                      The hay problem is only going to get worse I'm afraid and I have no idea what can be done to help it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Chardavej View Post
                        Depressing is right:

                        LOOSE HORSE SALE – Sold 200 head. Market lower due to large movement of horses with
                        the drought and that high price feed that the plants are forced to buy to feed the Hold Over horses
                        and for those lighter weight horses that need to go to feed lots before able to be processed.
                        Note on Culled Stallions- PLEASE geld those culled stallions before bringing to the market
                        to receive more than $50 for them. Mexico does NOT allow stallions to cross the border and
                        Canada has very strict & expensive rules on shipping of stallions to them.
                        Reminder - We can not accept extremely thin, deformed, blind or horses that can not travel on
                        all 3 legs. Sorry, we can not accept thinner stallions. $125 Fee for No Value horses left on
                        the premises. We are here the day prior to the sale accepting loose horses for the next days sale.
                        $125 disposal fee for No Value horses left was on the sidebar. I don't think I want to know

                        Although, honestly, I'd like to see low class auctions instituting a penalty for bringing in starving, lame, deformed, blind, etc horses... animals that if they were found at somebody's house would be called abuse... but since it's at an auction it's called business... Sometimes makes me wonder just how bad does something have to be to not ship :-( I never could understand how people could bring in such neglected animals and have no consequences.
                        http://www.leakycreek.com/
                        http://leakycreek.wordpress.com/ Rainbows & Mourning Doves Blog
                        John P. Smith II 1973-2009 Love Always
                        Father, Husband, Friend, Firefighter- Cancer Sucks- Cure Melanoma

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have a small herd of pets here - five goats, four sheep, three minis and a Thoroughbred - and I'm going through $100 a WEEK in hay. I have no large pastures to provide forage.

                          It's always been too costly for me to feed my friends - but now I'm concerned that there isn't going to be any hay to buy.

                          The drought here in Western NY and the worms that came through have devastated my hay supplier's fields.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'm about to move to Ohio, so hearing this makes me nervous.
                            However ...it can't be worse than the $22 I pay for a bale of mediocre T&A here in Florida. or $100 for a large round bale. Hay prices have gone up a good bit this year.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              We just filled up our barn for $4/bale, and that's the best price to be found in this area. We have a good "hay guy," who held on to 300 bales for us while my SO was in the hospital getting chemo, until we could come and pick it up. We're good for a year now.

                              It's just a backyard barn, though - three horses with 9 acres of pasture, so we don't go through hay as much as those horses kept in stalls or on dry lots.

                              A lot of local places are selling hay to the places that have had high hay prices for several months already because of the drought, so people in this area are suddenly finding that hay isn't just expensive. . .it's nowhere to be found.

                              There are a lot of people just "giving up and getting out" when it comes to horses. I've seen people riding local parks who have those bright orange "for sale" signs hanging on their horse.

                              This weekend I head to Shawnee State Park for Labor Day, and I'm a little afraid of what I'll see when it comes to the condition of the horses. Even in good years, it's apparent that some people just don't have the same standards of care. . .or they don't realize that throwing a horse into a weedy overgrown pasture is not the same as actually feeding it.
                              Please copy and paste this to your signature if you know someone, or have been affected by someone who needs a smack upside the head. Lets raise awareness.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by maunder View Post
                                The drought here in Western NY and the worms that came through have devastated my hay supplier's fields.
                                Yup. Cut worms and/or drought are reducing crops by half. We ordered our neighbor's second cutting alfalfa ahead of time expecting 50-75 bales. 27 were delivered. That was the whole field. Stepfather also has a small herd of grass fed beef to feed. Luckily he has already reduced the head count by half. It's going to be a lean winter.
                                ::I do not understand your specific kind of crazy, but I do admire your total commitment to it::

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Someone in the good hay area could make a killing if he/she invenseted in one of those balers that super compresses the hay into the tiny dense bales that are sent over to Japan and start shipping to feed stores in the drought areas.

                                  From what I know about shipping the size is more of a price factor than weight. and it might just be safer for the truck driver to have a bit more heft to the bales and the wind wouldn't blow over the truck so often.
                                  A pussycat of a horse with a chewed off tail won the triple crown, The Cubs won the world series and Trump won the Presidency.
                                  Don't tell me 'It can't be done.'

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I am very thankful for my hayman. He is not selling is hay out of state to make a killling and gouge people. I talked with him on the last delivery and he is keeping this hay for the regular customers and our price is going to remain the same. I can not tell you what a huge relief that is. I have only 2 horses, a pony and a couple of goats. Alot of people would dump a client as small as me with the money that they could make this year shipping it out.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      You'd better bake that man a pie!
                                      ::I do not understand your specific kind of crazy, but I do admire your total commitment to it::

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by 5 View Post
                                        Someone in the good hay area could make a killing if he/she invenseted in one of those balers that super compresses the hay into the tiny dense bales that are sent over to Japan and start shipping to feed stores in the drought areas.

                                        From what I know about shipping the size is more of a price factor than weight. and it might just be safer for the truck driver to have a bit more heft to the bales and the wind wouldn't blow over the truck so often.
                                        They already do that. My backup hay guy buys hay in the small, compressed bales. Suckers are heavy and explode when you cut the tape. You can also buy compressed bales at TSC.
                                        I'm a second hand Vegan. Cows eat grass. I eat cows.

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