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Why barbed wire and horses don't mix

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  • #21
    Originally posted by MistyBlue View Post
    Let's face it...these big beautiful animals wipe themselves out on whatever is handy. I wouldn't be a bit surprised if I saw a post on a horse that was injured or killed by a cotton ball.

    I have always said I could wrap my horse in bubble wrap and he would eat the bubble wrap and colic.... LOTS OF PRAYERS to take care of yourselves silly horses.
    If you like the distance you see; continue forward. If you don't; stay still and the shorter distance works out. ~GM~

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    • #22
      I prefer a well managed barb wire fence over that gosh darn electric ribbon crap, or those flimsy poorly installed vinyl fences.

      I have NEVER had any problems with barbed wire fencing, however, all barb wire fences I have used were five strand, properly installed, impeccably maintained, and NEVER side by side with another paddock.

      The #1 safety tip with barb wire is to walk the horse around the perimeter of the paddock and show it the fencing before turning it out.

      "Pat the horse; kick yourself" - Carl Hester

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      • #23
        Oh heavens, nothing says inexperienced diva more to me than the barbed wire vapors.

        Barbed wire done right plus some common sense is better than a lot of fencing that people think is safe for Pookie the Horse. Smooth wire bears a shocking resemblance to a cheese slicer and electric that doesn't bite is string and there they go out into the road.

        We, and all our horses, have a lifetime of experience with barbed wire and we only had one horse that really hurt herself badly in it. And she fully recovered-twice-with no vet bill.

        Tight barbed wire, with or without an electric wire in it, is the best horse or cow fence I've ever seen.
        “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

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        • #24
          Animal housing 101: barbed wire for cattle. NOT FOR HORSES

          sorry, end of story.

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          • #25
            Never had a problem with horses in large barbed (you know you say bob) wire fields. Did sit up with the neighbor in VA one night and the vet picking splinters out of the yearling filly that couldn't clear the 4 board fence and drove an arm sized splinter through her chest, leaving lots of little splinters inside.

            I don't see anybody on the ban board fencing bandwagon
            Originally posted by The Saddle
            Perhaps I need my flocking adjusted.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by Horsie View Post
              Do I have to have first-hand experience with drunk driving to know that that's a bad idea?

              I still haven't gotten an answer from you about what makes somone qualified and gives them sufficient experience to have horses behind barbed wire.

              I can deal with someone shrugging and saying that barbed wire is the only feasible option for the large space they have. I can't deal with the argument that "only feasible option" equates to "acceptable and safe."
              Maybe just common sense horse management is all it takes to be qualified, as millions of horses kept behind barbed wire without injuries can attest to?

              You know, there are many people just as convinced that riding horses is harmful to them, it has to be, what with those metal bits in their mouths and not even talking about the horrible whips and spurs.
              Those people have never been closer to a horse than watching a western, but they have a very firm opinion about what horses are and how terrible we are to think riding them makes sense.

              That is about how those seem that dismiss barbed wire fences with such fervor.
              To the rest of us, that have managed and seen thousands of horses behind good barbed wire management, without any more trouble than any other fence out there, well, those all against barbed wire just seem to not know any better.

              Some times, when others keep telling you you don't know enough, think that maybe what you so firmly thought you knew may not be quite so, maybe it bears a second thought?

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              • #27
                Im with Horsie

                I personally dont like barbed wire either

                Ive seen WAY too many horrific accidents. Even from the most experienced ranchers..... (YES, there ARE OTHER people who have experience too, not just the few experts on EVERYTHING on this forum) even THEY have had lethal BW accidents

                I know I cant protect my horses from everything, but, I want MY horses to have the safest environment/opportunities I can give them

                having said that, I dont really care what other people keep their horses on (to each his own) but, dont come crying to me about expenses WHEN "IT" happens. I chose to put my money into safe fencing rather than vet bills.. and it only takes 1 time (even in a lifetime) to be something you never forget.....

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                • #28
                  I think Mistyblue hit the nail on the head here. Horses will hurt themselves on anything.

                  That does not make us devoid of responsibility in attempting to make things as safe as possible for them.


                  I think the problem that I have with posts like Bluey's is that it is implied that barbed wire is just fine anywhere if you only have enough experience.

                  Would I use barbed wire? No. But using it for huge fields where the horses are not encountering the fence lines frequently it should work as an OK horse containment system.

                  It for sure should not be used for paddocks and such where the horses are interacting over a fence with other horses or in close proximity to the fence by default of the size of the area enclosed.

                  Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                  You ought to put the blame where blame is due, with the owner that had a mare where it would want to kick at other horses across a fence, any fence.
                  Um, doesn't that describe any and every horse?
                  Some horses kick. Should they all be kept totally encased in solid walls?

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                  • #29
                    Please don't feed this Horsie. While perhaps not a complete troll, Horsie primarily posts to pick fights or cause controversy. At any rate, s/he'll just keep repeating the same things while becoming less polite, so don't take the bait Bluey.

                    Personally, I'd rather avoid barbed wire but I have had it my whole life in our cattle fields. Sometimes the horses are in those fields too, and we have never had a problem. However, we use board fencing in the area designated primarily for horses, and we did have a mare who went through a fence and broke her neck.
                    Holy crap, how does Darwin keep missing you? ~Lauruffian

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                    • #30
                      Horses and fences don't mix. Period. Full Stop.

                      They can rip a leg off with oak planks, high tensile or plastic tape.

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Originally posted by trubandloki View Post
                        I think Mistyblue hit the nail on the head here. Horses will hurt themselves on anything.

                        That does not make us devoid of responsibility in attempting to make things as safe as possible for them.


                        I think the problem that I have with posts like Bluey's is that it is implied that barbed wire is just fine anywhere if you only have enough experience.

                        Would I use barbed wire? No. But using it for huge fields where the horses are not encountering the fence lines frequently it should work as an OK horse containment system.

                        It for sure should not be used for paddocks and such where the horses are interacting over a fence with other horses or in close proximity to the fence by default of the size of the area enclosed.


                        Um, doesn't that describe any and every horse?
                        Some horses kick. Should they all be kept totally encased in solid walls?
                        No, I tried to make it plenty clear there are only some places barbed wire fences are ok and it is not "anywhere".

                        Thanks for the warning.
                        I know some people you can't reason with and that is ok.
                        We need to remember that here we are talking to a much larger and varied audience that one poster.
                        They all deserve to hear all sides of any topic.

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                        • #32
                          Originally posted by trubandloki View Post
                          Um, doesn't that describe any and every horse?
                          Some horses kick. Should they all be kept totally encased in solid walls?
                          The safest looking corrals I've seen are the adobe wall kinds. I always admire them in photographs. But I'm sure a horse can shatter a leg kicking those too.

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                          • #33
                            Originally posted by SmartAlex View Post
                            Horses and fences don't mix. Period. Full Stop.

                            They can rip a leg off with oak planks, high tensile or plastic tape.
                            One of my horses had a huge splinter in his neck and it had to be cut out. Fun stuff.

                            And fencing they can get through, get loose and cause trouble too.

                            So yeah, I agree with Smart Alex - because she is Smart.
                            If you like the distance you see; continue forward. If you don't; stay still and the shorter distance works out. ~GM~

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                            • #34
                              Agreed, horses and fencing don't mix.

                              Also barbed wire (and yes, IRL pronounced Bob Wire, LOL) is definitely *not* a good fence for cross fencing or smaller areas or dry lots. The place where I boarded/worked as a young one had barbed wire around the big boarder turnout and as a perimeter fence around the entire back acreage which was fields, woods and ponds for trail rides. Boarder field was 30 acres, back area was almost 100 acres. All the smaller fenced areas had board fencing.

                              And yep, I spent a lot more up front to fence in the best fencing I could find to avoid future vet bills. However, if I had actual large acreage...no way would I have spent the $6500 per acre to fence it. For those who do have 50+ acres fenced in $8-$10 a linear foot fencing...kudos on your millions.

                              We try to keep them as safe as possible. And we try to do it affordably. 100 acres of multi-board or flex fence or whatever just is not feasibly affordable for the vast majority of people. Not everyone lives on one of the expensive coasts. And truth be told...I'd bet lots of us would trade the small manicured paddocks in fancy fencing for hundreds of acres of open grazing surrounded by barbed wire if possible.

                              (except for the trying to find and catch your horse in turnouts that big)
                              You jump in the saddle,
                              Hold onto the bridle!
                              Jump in the line!
                              ...Belefonte

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                              • #35
                                We've had barbed wire discussions several times on COTH. I have no issue with properly maintained, properly anchored barbed wire. That's not saying I use it, but I have no qualms with folks that do. I do shudder when I see horses hanging out behind sagging, rusty, loose barbed wire just WAITING to claim a victim.

                                I have also seen horses victim to electrobraid fencing with the same amount of damage.
                                If wishes were horses then beggars would ride...
                                DLA: Draft Lovers Anonymous
                                Originally posted by talkofthetown
                                As in, the majikal butterfly-fahting gypsy vanners.

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                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by Hippolyta View Post
                                  Animal housing 101: barbed wire for cattle. NOT FOR HORSES

                                  sorry, end of story.
                                  Not quite

                                  Fences are to "intimidate" the horse into thinking they can not break thru. Barbwire, comes in many different types. It is up to the owner to evaluate what type of barb and the size to be fenced.

                                  Large pastures can be managed very well and as one poster stated usually tyhe horse will not go near the fence.

                                  Also depends on the breed of horse.

                                  I have 20 acres in 3 board 1 x 6 x 10...many say it should be 2 x 6 x what ever lenth I need. I do have that for stallion paddocks and it has 5 boards with a height of 8 feet.

                                  The pastures don't need it. I would rather have the horse break the board than their shoulder or leg

                                  The worst accidents I have seen have been the welded pipe rail fences with the cable stretched tight. Horse almost sawed his leg off...a couple of others broke their shoulders as the fence did not give when they hit it.

                                  You don't put 10 highly bred yearling colts in a 5 acre "pasture" with barb wife. As Bluey stated..you must manage it.

                                  Most have too many horses for the amount of grazable land
                                  The Elephant in the room

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                                  • #37
                                    The area I live in is cattle land and tons of horses live in barbed wire and many with no issues. These are generally large pastures. BUT when an accident does happen it is really ugly. I do know that many horses learn to respect barbed wire if they grow up in it. It bites them when they are young and they do not want to go near it. But an accident still can happen. I have also seen accidents with alternative "safe" fencing because the horses do not respect it. Electric is probably one of the best as it gets their attention, but accidents still happen when they unintentionally get into it.
                                    So I guess the just of it is that barb does not guarantee an accident or may even be a statistically high rate of issue, many horses lived their whole life behind it without incident. People can leave gates open and horses can get into trouble, barns burn down all the time, horses have a significantly higher rate of colic because they are keep in stalls without proper turnout, horses are hurt during transport, Eventing and racing results in the death of several horses every year..
                                    Most people try and give their horses the best quality of life possible but there is usually limitations in their ability to protect them against all forms of potential damage. So to be super critical of barb wire in a safer format is being a bit short-sighted of the big picture. Many horses are not getting proper care or food. Many are keep like hot house tomatoes and have long term health issues because of it. Many are used up and sold when they can no longer serve a purpose. I do not see a large barb fenced pasture as the biggest issue horses face. If you feel it is, we also better not keep a horse in a wood barn, it must have a good turn out and an excellent quality of habitat, not transported (as driving is one of the biggest hazards statistically we face), and not participating in any hazardous riding activities. Life is hazardous. Stuff happens.
                                    If you are a proponent of zero potential for incident, you should never be on a road. There is more chance of getting hurt there then riding a horse without a skid lid. I do wear a lid, because it is easy to do and I cannot stop driving but many people cannot re-do their pastures. And how many horses would be shipped to Mexico or Canada if those barb wire homes were deemed unsuitable?
                                    What should be and what is reasonable is two different discussions.

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      I have boarded at places where the neighbors had put up twisted non barbed wire.
                                      It is available but without electricity I could see a horse not respecting it very much.

                                      A horse could get hurt in a rubber room if you gave them the chance.
                                      3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375 10582097494459230781640628620899862803482534211706 79821480865132823066470938446095505822317253594081 284811174502841027019385.....

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                                      • #39
                                        Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                                        You ought to put the blame where blame is due, with the owner that had a mare where it would want to kick at other horses across a fence, any fence.
                                        I expect her kicking any fence would have resulted in injuries.

                                        Barbed wire has it's place, as millions of horses have lived and are living safely behind it still today, but of course you have to manage for it properly.
                                        Barbed wire is not for small areas or where horses may fight or definitely not where there are horses across from each other.
                                        I have seen injuries by most any kind of fences, even from horses kicking the walls in supposedly safe stalls.

                                        You don't put a horse, any horse, across from another with any but very solid and safe fences and don't sooner or later have some injuries.
                                        Best is not to go there, have a lane between horse pastures.

                                        Best luck to get the mare healed well, any such injuries take much time and good management to get over.
                                        I agree with this. Around here, if you want to board in pasture, barbed wire fencing is pretty much the only choice. In the six years I have pasture boarded, I have only known of two incidents of a horse getting cut. One was a TB fresh off the track who was a bit nutty, the other was rider induced when someone wasn't paying attention to the footing on a trail. In both cases the horses healed fine.
                                        Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
                                        http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
                                        http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...SC/running.jpg

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                                        • #40
                                          Originally posted by cowboymom View Post
                                          Oh heavens, nothing says inexperienced diva more to me than the barbed wire vapors.

                                          .

                                          Ha!
                                          Not a fan, myself, but again, that's the difference between relatively small enclosures in the east, and wide open spaces elsewhere.
                                          "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

                                          ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

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