• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Tennessee Walking Horse Soring Issue *Update post 1*

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Sharing a good video showing two single foot trainers and their horses. What is great is the sound. You can hear the 4 beats and you can hear then fast/slow and in out of 4 beating then step/pacing then back to 4 beating.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeEsWKuJzP0

    And the head is MOL still and the rider is holding it up a bit to keep them in gait. When I find a good "walking gait" video with sound I will put it up for comparison.

    Sure modifications can be made to the use style and training - - but these are good examples and good quality sound for the gaiter enthusiasts of some naturally ambling/racking horses. Note the increase in leg lift/reach with speed.
    from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

    Comment


    • You can not hear the walking gait foot falls too well here - but you can sure see the difference in the sweeping verses stepping movement of this good example of a walking gait:

      http://youtu.be/ynIW3SGW8BI
      from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

      Comment


      • A TWH step pacing - smoothly - almost racking:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJv4fPrSWns
        from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

        Comment


        • This will be the last one - sorry - Tell me you are't looking for the train!

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHXXMJspS44
          from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

          Comment


          • Those were cool to watch, Hurley, thanks for posting them.
            "Anti-intellect and marketing, pretty, pretty, who needs talent
            Crying eyes, we're so outnumbered, fight for the right to remain silent" Buck 65

            Comment


            • Someone needs to make an audio of footfalls. That would be so awesome.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Fairfax View Post
                A major equine lawyer has responded to me.

                Leo

                The problem with wording is interpretation. Is a "Racking Horse" different from a horse who has been trained to rack.

                You mentioned a defining factor could be an announcer yelling.."Rack On"

                It is my belief that a group could challenge the word, Rack, in the courts nd a judge with little to no equine horse experience would make the determination.

                He/She would be at a disadvantage due to the nuance of the word, Racking Horse Breed and a Horse that is trained to Rack.

                You have every right to be concerned. As should, all horse breed groups and breeders/owners.

                Good Luck

                Paul
                LEO, if you and your lawyer friend would read the text instead of just guessing, you see that it is BREED specific.

                Holy Toledo, would you confuse a Quarter Horse with a Thoroughbred if someone just yelled out "gallop on"?????

                Racking horse is a BREED, just as Tennessee Walking Horse is a breed. Or maybe you should call the Racking Horse Breeders Association of America and tell them that your pissed they don't let other horses that rack into their breed.

                You truly can not be this dense, can you?

                Comment


                • Originally posted by sunridge1 View Post
                  SB peep here. The seems to be much confusion these days about rack, stepping pace, running walk. The real difference between them is all about footfall sequence/set down, pick-up and whether they are square versus lateral. I think it's gotten to the point where people don't even know the difference anymore.

                  I see TWH step pace more than anything whether they are supposed to be running walk or racking.

                  I was always told that a true rack has more HOCK not more knee. In the old days there was a marked difference between the running walk and the rack.
                  Very good job explaining it Sunridge. The front legs of the Racking horse curl at the knee more than a Walking horse. On the back legs (which most judges don't even look at in my experience) the hock action is different in TWH and RH's.

                  Comment


                  • Good vids Hurley. When I was an apprentice judge, my mentor told me to listen for the footfall in the Racking Horse. It is very distinct and you can certainly hear all four feet landing independently of each other.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by hurleycane View Post
                      A TWH step pacing - smoothly - almost racking:

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJv4fPrSWns
                      OK, this is something my little guy has definitely got in his "gearbox." He'll hit this step-pace between canter transitions; it's like his back end sits, his front end grows (helps if I do "Harley handlebars" with the reins), and it's quite pleasant and easy to sit unless and until it falls into a hard pace, which I won't let him do.

                      This is a 7-year old who hasn't really got a dialed-in RW yet. Now my question: I've heard the step-pace isn't good for their backs and hocks. So should I let him do it if he wants to? We are the lone gaiters in H/J central so we're on our own!

                      Comment


                      • CleanupTn,
                        Please stop the personal attacks! I am tired of you and your new-found friends attacking anyone who questions your obvious inability to define a racking horse. Just admit that Fairfax has a good point. His questions have flummoxed you and you can't control your anger. Please play nice or perhaps it is time to close this thread. Churlishness does not become you!

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          7A - i took you off ignore for a quick second to read what you had to say. A quick search of your posts reveals the type of posts you make and why you are posting in this thread. Please move along if you dont have anything constructive to add. Or - stay around and be put on, or back on (for me) ignore.
                          from sunridge1 Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
                            OK, this is something my little guy has definitely got in his "gearbox." He'll hit this step-pace between canter transitions; it's like his back end sits, his front end grows (helps if I do "Harley handlebars" with the reins), and it's quite pleasant and easy to sit unless and until it falls into a hard pace, which I won't let him do.

                            This is a 7-year old who hasn't really got a dialed-in RW yet. Now my question: I've heard the step-pace isn't good for their backs and hocks. So should I let him do it if he wants to? We are the lone gaiters in H/J central so we're on our own!
                            I would say what you heard is correct cause all the gaited gurus I know will point out the body tension of the step pace leads to long term stiffness. But the same guru will not worry about the step pace if the horse is also worked to do all the other good stuff - bending flexing and especially gaiting at a slower speed with a lower head.

                            My guess is this horse in the video would do a good FW RW if he was allowed to be slow enough. And you can see a couple of times as he comes down in his gait he gets a longer stride with a lower head and the nod shows up as well.
                            from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
                              OK, this is something my little guy has definitely got in his "gearbox." He'll hit this step-pace between canter transitions; it's like his back end sits, his front end grows (helps if I do "Harley handlebars" with the reins), and it's quite pleasant and easy to sit unless and until it falls into a hard pace, which I won't let him do.

                              This is a 7-year old who hasn't really got a dialed-in RW yet. Now my question: I've heard the step-pace isn't good for their backs and hocks. So should I let him do it if he wants to? We are the lone gaiters in H/J central so we're on our own!

                              This bolded part is VERY desirable!!!!
                              from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by 7arabians View Post
                                perhaps it is time to close this thread.
                                You/Leo would love to close yet another thread in which your input isn't viewed as important or factual as you hoped for.
                                ************************
                                \"Horses lend us the wings we lack\"

                                Comment


                                • Originally posted by 7arabians View Post
                                  CleanupTn,
                                  Please stop the personal attacks! I am tired of you and your new-found friends attacking anyone who questions your obvious inability to define a racking horse. Just admit that Fairfax has a good point. His questions have flummoxed you and you can't control your anger. Please play nice or perhaps it is time to close this thread. Churlishness does not become you!
                                  7, so what you're saying is that you didn't know there was such a BREED as a Racking Horse, huh? So far, I think the BREED Racking Horse has been described very well by myself and others who actually know what they are. It seems that everyone who is here about the TWH gets along just fine.....it's those with other agendas who don't fit in so well.

                                  Comment


                                  • Originally posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
                                    OK, this is something my little guy has definitely got in his "gearbox." He'll hit this step-pace between canter transitions; it's like his back end sits, his front end grows (helps if I do "Harley handlebars" with the reins), and it's quite pleasant and easy to sit unless and until it falls into a hard pace, which I won't let him do.

                                    This is a 7-year old who hasn't really got a dialed-in RW yet. Now my question: I've heard the step-pace isn't good for their backs and hocks. So should I let him do it if he wants to? We are the lone gaiters in H/J central so we're on our own!
                                    Lady E, have you tried working your horse going up hills? That seems to do a lot of strengthening and developing of the muscles they use when they FW or RW. And does he get into that hard pace when he picks up speed or does he just fall in and out of gear?

                                    Comment


                                    • Originally posted by CleanUpTN View Post
                                      Lady E, have you tried working your horse going up hills? That seems to do a lot of strengthening and developing of the muscles they use when they FW or RW. And does he get into that hard pace when he picks up speed or does he just fall in and out of gear?
                                      I love your stuff CleanUpTN!!

                                      I want to add a question to Lady Eboshi - Are you in any way restraining the head of your horse with a constant back pressure backward or fixed pressure on both reins? The handle bar hand position can do this as it can trap the head up and close down the hinds. Quite a few Walking Horse trainers I have seen will use one rein or the other in a slow rhythm opening and closing a "bump"when trying to get a change or correction in gait.
                                      from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

                                      Comment


                                      • Originally posted by hurleycane View Post
                                        I love your stuff CleanUpTN!!

                                        I want to add a question to Lady Eboshi - Are you in any way restraining the head of your horse with a constant back pressure backward or fixed pressure on both reins? The handle bar hand position can do this as it can trap the head up and close down the hinds. Quite a few Walking Horse trainers I have seen will use one rein or the other in a slow rhythm opening and closing a "bump"when trying to get a change or correction in gait.
                                        Many thanks for answering my questions! Right now I'm more or less experimenting; trying things and then making them "keepers" when he responds. I've had him 4 years, got him newly started at 3 (he'd been a rescue, seized by the State of Arkansas a few months previous in a neglect case) and for the first year just enjoyed him as a trail horse as I was told he was too young to learn to gait. He does have very loose stifles! Since then, I have done a lot of hill work with him, making sure he's pushing off and using himself from behind, and he's now grown into himself and showing me a variety of gaits.

                                        I work him 90% of the time in flat walk on a loose rein or very light contact and only "put him together" a little more when asking for a transition. When he was younger and not so strong, he would indeed raise his head and get hollow and tense through his back and then skitter forward in something almost like that single-foot rack. As an old dressage rider I know that tension and hollowness ain't good, so I've concentrated on "calm, forward and straight" and only this spring begun to really try to separate out what he's got and encourage or reject what's in there. He DOES like a little bit of "lifting" contact when I ask him to canter, but for RW it's too much. The most mysterious thing is, I've only gotten the big head-nod a few times . . .

                                        He appears to be a very well-bred (unpapered, regrettably) TWH.
                                        Decidedly the type who would have been a candidate for padded if he hadn't been such a little (13.3 then, 14.3 now) baby. He dodged THAT bullet and got culled. FABULOUSLY brave, if he were 16.1 and a TB we'd be eventing Prelim!

                                        I keep hoping the RW develops over time . . .

                                        Comment


                                        • WITW, I can't send you a private message cause your inbox is full LOL

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X