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Tennessee Walking Horse Soring Issue *Update post 1*

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  • Somehow I'm living right here in central Alabama, with a decent command of my native language, and I don't know anyone who's been fed to a gator. I feel so uneducated!

    Stop with the broken English and the 'weze awl redneks and Suthrn justiss' nonsense, aarpaso. I have a freakin idea what happens, fool. Speak in complete sentences that do more than say !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Comment


    • Originally posted by walknsound View Post
      Just b/c one happens to agree with a couple points made by HSUS and be grateful they exposed the video on soring, does not constitute following their agenda. Don't see why you can't see that?
      Exactly. I believe almost all on this forum know about the agenda of HSUS. It is pointed out over and over. We know about it.

      HSUS has done ONE thing good--exposing the video of soring and stewarding. That's all.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        katerine - not surprised you dont know anyone who has been fed to a gator, but does your state have a Missing Persons list ? lol

        aarpaso has his/her own way of writing and it always gets the point across.
        from sunridge1 Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.

        Comment


        • For those who may not understand and for clarity please note:

          The Tennessee Walking horse is NOT a high stepping horse. Emphasis on NOT. Its walking gait is a sweeping relaxed and powerful cadenced movement. Emphasis on sweeping. The more properly powered up and relaxed in the walking gait they are, the deeper the reach of their legs and the deeper the nod of their head, the more they will snorttle, clack their teeth and flop their ears. It is then you will get the power glide and cupping sound effects of the of the 4 beat foot fall that is the magnificent walking machine of a properly ridden and trained TWH. AND they can go for miles and sweet miles in this relaxed gait and are very sure footed in it.
          from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

          Comment


          • Originally posted by hurleycane View Post
            For those who may not understand and for clarity please note:

            The Tennessee Walking horse is NOT a high stepping horse. Emphasis on NOT. Its walking gait is a sweeping relaxed and powerful cadenced movement. Emphasis on sweeping. The more properly powered up and relaxed in the walking gait they are, the deeper the reach of their legs and the deeper the nod of their head, the more they will snorttle, clack their teeth and flop their ears. It is then you will get the power glide and cupping sound effects of the of the 4 beat foot fall that is the magnificent walking machine of a properly ridden and trained TWH. AND they can go for miles and sweet miles in this relaxed gait and are very sure footed in it.
            Very true.

            Comment


            • I'd like to attend the Tennessee State fair to support the TWH and NWHA but I have a conflict that weekend.

              I do plan to go to Wilmington, Ohio to their national show in October. I can hit that one and then a short drive up the road to the Quarter Horse Congress in the same long weekend.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Rbow View Post
                I'd like to attend the Tennessee State fair to support the TWH and NWHA but I have a conflict that weekend.

                I do plan to go to Wilmington, Ohio to their national show in October. I can hit that one and then a short drive up the road to the Quarter Horse Congress in the same long weekend.
                You are gonna have some fun! Do you ride TWH?
                from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

                Comment


                • Originally posted by hurleycane View Post
                  You are gonna have some fun! Do you ride TWH?
                  YES, and I think it's time to join NWHA and get them more involved.

                  But the Quarter Horse Congress has GREAT shopping !

                  Comment


                  • Lucky YOU! Though I do not own a TWH one of mine is most likely a grade TWH. And when he was rideable - he was something else I tell ya. Something else. You see the only experience I had when I got him was with saddle breds. And so to gait him, I would raise my hands and kiss him forward. And yes he would rack and it was fun.

                    Then I had the good simple fortune to take him to a place where the trainer had walking horses. On my first ride there she deconstructed that down and out stiff saddle seat leg and lowered my hands having me "just sit quiet with a relaxed leg and hip."

                    And then it happened.

                    He started nodding and the cupping feet rose up to my chest in a lovely vibration. And when we asked a little more... he powered up the back end.

                    All I can say is - incredible.
                    from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

                    Comment


                    • That sweeping relaxed gait is what most trail riders like,alot of Field Trial Folks LOVE the ground covering ride when working their bird dogs.

                      folks with back and hip problems have to stop riding if they have a trotting breed,but not so with a walker or other gaited breed.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by WalkInTheWoods View Post
                        This will be some nice exposure !

                        The National Walking Horse Association (NWHA) is excited to partner with Tom Seay and Best of America by Horseback to promote the natural Walking Horse. Since its inception in 1998, NWHA has worked diligently to increase public awareness of the NATURAL abilities of the flat shod Walking Horse in such areas as trail riding programs, rail horse competitions, Dressage, Reining and timed events.

                        Headquartered at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Kentucky, the National Walking Horse Association is the foremost sound walking horse organization in the United States today. For over 14 years, NWHA has been promoting the general welfare of and serving as an advocate for the Walking Horse against abusive and inhumane treatment. As a USDA-certified HIO, NWHA has adopted and enforced the highest level of penalties for Horse Protection Act violators, adopted “no tolerance” for soring practices, and has a mandatory requirement that all DQP’s and Board of Directors members have no violations of the HPA. Soon after it’s founding, NWHA prohibited pads, chains, and other action devices from all of the Association’s competitions.

                        Some of our most notable achievements are that NWHA was the Walking Horse Breed Representative for 2010 World Equestrian Games, NWHA is the Walking Horse Breed Affiliate Organization for USEF, NWHA is a certified HIO approved by the Kentucky Racing Commission to inspect horses that receive Kentucky Breeders Incentive funds; and, NWHA's National Championship show is the largest flat shod Walking Horse show in the nation and the second largest Walking Horse show overall.

                        NWHA highlights our trail horses and their dedicated riders through our Trail Rider Incentive Program (T.R.I.P) and our Competitive Horse Incentive Program (C.H.I.P). The T.R.I.P. is open to all NWHA members riding any gaited horse or any gaited horse owned by a NWHA member. Awards for T.R.I.P are based on time spent in the saddle. Trail hours are counted in 15-minute increments with a minimum of 30 minutes per ride. Any NWHA-affiliated ride or ACTHA Competitive Trail Challenge counts for double hours. The annual high hour rider is presented with the Iron Buns Award, a customized silver belt buckle designed for the T.R.I.P. program. Also, the high hour horse and high hour youth rider receive an annual award. These awards are presented at our NWHA Annual Membership Meeting. The C.H.I.P is designated for NWHA members that compete in any kind of competitive trail event such as competitive trail rides or endurance rides. Riders accrue mileage at sanctioned Competitive Trail and Endurance rides. Awards for C.H.I.P. are based on miles and awarded at designated hourly levels. These year-end awards are also presented at our Annual Membership Meeting. Visit www.nwha.com for more information on these and other programs that we offer.

                        Jason Crawhorn ~ NWHA President
                        I went back to read this and just want to being it forward for comments.

                        As I read through this - what strikes me as important and maybe something we can consider the coming future for the breed is the term Walking Horse. Losing the Tennessee in the breed designation and being headquartered in Kentucky was a very good move to distance themselves from the stigma of the "clown" shoeing and abuse that has become the public perception of the 'Tennessee' Walking Horse. The choice of 'National' was very smart! ANd the omission of Tennessee was very intentional - this horse needs to shed the stigma of the TWHBEA and the like in order to have a respected future. This breed really deserves the return to its fantastic roots.

                        I am really glad NWHA has stuck it out, grown, matured refined and fought hard legally to establish themselves. Invitation to WEG, USEF affiliation, fourteen years.

                        Yes, it is time to support them more. And we need to get behind that thought on a perpetual Roy Exum trophy class. ANd perhaps we need to learn more about how this organization came to be. My bet is there are some real horsemen at its inception that need/deserve recognition.
                        from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

                        Comment


                        • Best friend's hubby decided to wanted to learn to ride. I tole him I could show him what I know, then turn him over to a pro. I let him ride my TWH, then my Mustang mare. (Both safe mounts.) He got off the Mustang and announced, "I want to ride the Walker, the Mustang is like being in a blender." LOL! That didn't take long!

                          Comment


                          • http://www.nwha.com/membershipform.html

                            Here is a link for membership (NWHA).
                            from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by walknsound View Post
                              Best friend's hubby decided to wanted to learn to ride. I tole him I could show him what I know, then turn him over to a pro. I let him ride my TWH, then my Mustang mare. (Both safe mounts.) He got off the Mustang and announced, "I want to ride the Walker, the Mustang is like being in a blender." LOL! That didn't take long!
                              Pretty incredible and fun for him I am sure. Makes me smile when I see folks discover the gaited horse. Such a joy.
                              from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

                              Comment


                              • A good read from this site: http://triplekbarc.com/blog/history-of-horses/

                                It all started in the 1800’s with a makeup of breeds from the Saddlebred, Morgan, American Saddle Horse and Thoroughbred.

                                The Tennessee Walking Horse began with Allan, (sometimes spelled Allen or Alan), a colt, foaled in 1886 (later referred to as Allan F-1) in Lexington, KY. Allan, who was by Alandorf, (a Standardbred pacing stallion) son of Onward and out of Maggie Marshall, a trotting Morgan horse was small, black and was not a good candidate for a racing pacer; therefore, he was sold and traded many times.

                                As he was traded and sold around he was called Joe Alan, Old Black Alan and was used as a teasing stud for jacks. In 1903, J. A. McCullouch traded him to James Brantely for a mule.

                                Mr. Brantely, being an excellent judge of horseflesh saw something special in this small black stallion – history was in the making. Mr. Brantley would become one of three of the best breeders of Walking Horses ever. The other two men were Albert Dement and Bright Hunter.

                                Mr. Dement purchased Allen from Mr. Brantely in 1909 and paid a mere $140.00 for him and bred him to his best mare Nell Dement. Nell was a registered Saddle Horse and would later be known as Nell Dement F-3. Nell and Alan produced the filly, Merry Legs F-4.

                                Allen died at age 24 in 1910. The last 7 years of his life he would become known as the Grand Sire of the Tennessee Walking Horse and was bred to 111 mares documented of the best blood of the Morgan, Saddlebred and Standardbreds to be found. Mr. Albert Dement was known in his time as a “genetic engineer” – he had the inherent ability to judge what genetic contributions a horse could offer to future generations. One of his main goals in life was to establish a breed of horses that would consistently produce easy-disposition, naturally gaited offspring.

                                He bred Merry Legs several times to top studs, but still had not found all the ingredients necessary to replicate the genes for which he had been searching for all his adult life.

                                Mr. Dement bred Merry Legs twice to Hunter’s Allen (Hunter’s Allen F-10), a golden chestnut with an off hind sock and a star who was by Allen F-1 and out of Alli (owned by Bright Hunter), but lost both foals in the first 2 breedings. Mr. Dement tried again in 1930.


                                Our Dement "Last Chance" Mares Longview's Surprise Chance, Chance's Little Princess, & Longview's Chance Memory
                                A lifetime of studying bloodlines, visualizing conformations and using selected inbreeding techniques was all “on the line” a cool morning in the spring of 1931. There on the ground, next to his Mama, lay a sorrel colt with a strip, two socks and flaxen mane. This was the 13th and last foal from Merry Legs and the horse that would carry Albert Dement’s dream and breeding instincts into the future – a stud colt he called Last Chance.

                                From that day in 1931 until his death in 1956, Last Chance was one of the Premier Breeding Stallions in Tennessee horse world.

                                After Mr. Dement’s death in 1940, his horses were passed on to his son, Arthur. At no time from 1940 until Arthur’s death in 1989 and beyond, were any Dement-owned mares bred to outside stallions. All Dement-owned mares from Last Chance and his sons were bred back to Last Chance and his sons for more than 50 years. These precious genes were carefully protected from all outside dilution and preserved for posterity through these wonderful horses.

                                According to Mr. W.J. McGill of Shelbyville, TN in written article descriptions of Allan in 1945, he states “Allan is described as black, near hind sock, off hind foot, white to ankle, and blaze, smart ears, perfect head, wonderful eyes, full and well set, a long rangy neck, beautiful mane and foretop, a decided sloping shoulder, and a breast that belongs to an outstanding Tennessee Walking Horse.

                                His fine body lines, short back, long belly, well-coupled, smooth hips and rump, natural-set long, wavy tail, with the abundant style he shows in head and neck, smooth limbs, cordy muscles, good foot and bone, his superb gaits, his easy, graceful way of going into the fast running walk, justifies our statement that he was as fine as they make them”. Allan was a gentle, dependable horse that a woman or child could ride.


                                Longview’s Unique Dement when in foal by Tennessee Goldust
                                James Brantley, Albert Dement and Bright Hunter established the HEART of the Tennessee Walking Horse. It was Albert Dement who established and secured the Charter for the Registry and served as the first and second President of the TWHBA.

                                I am so grateful for these men of the past, who saw a vision and produced their dream. Giving me the opportunity to live my dream. I am in AWE each and every time I read this history and how such a wonderful, magnificent breed became in existence.

                                Triple-K-Bar-C TWH Farm, LLC continued preserving and increasing this gene pool with our breedings.

                                Click here to read Albert Dement’s 1905 Vision of the Future Foundation TWH Breed published in the Tennessee Valley Farmer(date unknown)

                                Click on the links below for more great history of the Tennessee Walking Horse:

                                Walking Horse News (Canada) – Walk to Another Rhythm
                                From Gaited Horse magazine, Fall 2001 – Working the Walk (PDF)
                                An exerpt about Albert Dement from the Biography of the Tennessee Walking Horse (PDF)[/I][/I]
                                from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  Great reading hurleycane ! Heres a link to a short article - then click on the links below it.

                                  http://www.bbdsedson.com/keyconnect/...se/Rhythmn.htm
                                  from sunridge1 Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    http://chattanoogan.com/2012/8/12/23...re-Abused.aspx

                                    Roy Exum: Why Horses Are Abused
                                    Sunday, August 12, 2012 - by Roy Exum

                                    In the past three months I have taken a crash course called “Walking Horse Abuse 101” and by my tally I grade about a C-minus, which is almost average for anyone who thought a pastern was country way of saying where horses graze grass. It turns out a pastern is a tender part of a horse’s foot where evil people drive nails, insert golf balls or apply heavy pads so the animals will lift their painful front hooves in a very unnatural gait called “The Big Lick.”

                                    The biggest mystery to me is why anyone would sore a horse, but there is overwhelming evidence that caustic chemicals are routinely applied to the forelegs of performance horses in search of a grotesque dance that happens every August.
                                    I was drawn into the fray in May after seeing a horrendous videotape that shocked and angered the entire nation. Since then I have had thousands of “teachers” who, through private email, have bared a very revolting part of the Walking Horse industry to me.

                                    The public outcry has been incredible, lending credence to the notion this year’s National Celebration, which is slated to begin its 11-day run in Shelbyville on Aug. 22, will be unlike the shows of the past. The reason is the Shelbyville-based hierarchy is fighting with all its might against mounting pressure from every direction to finally clean up 50 years of abuse, corruption and the now-seedy image of the Walking Horse industry when, in fact, the defenseless horses are one of the most noble breeds in America.

                                    According to the Bible’s New Testament, 1st Timothy 6:10 starts "For the love of money is the root of all evil" and nothing could be closer to the truth when it comes to deliberately soring a horse. Just like some people go to the Indianapolis 500 to see the cars crash, there are those who go to Shelbyville to see the freaks.

                                    A growing number of trainers say “The Big Lick” can’t be achieved without the hideous and sadistic methods used to produce the unnatural stomping gait, but if the government – both on the state and Congressional level – succeeds in outlawing such depravity, some say Shelbyville’s house of cards could collapse and, according to enforcement official, that is where “the root of all evil” is located.

                                    The horse show has historically brought hundreds of thousands of dollars to Shelbyville’s distressed economy, but it also lines the pockets of those who are now so viciously fighting the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Humane Society of the United States, and a clamoring public to stop the vile abuse and eradicate once and for all the stacks, or pads, and action devices that cause horse lovers of other American breeds to angrily weep.

                                    David Howard, who has craftily wormed his way into the Walking Horse elite of Shelbyville, is today believed to be the ringleader of “The Big Lick” faction. He controls the Celebration board, which picks the judges for the show. He also owns the Walking Horse Report, that is chock full of expensive ads from hopeful owners and trainers, and he owns several other horse-related enterprises.

                                    If “The Big Lick” is eliminated, the crowds may not return to Shelbyville because there would be no more freaks, then the pages of ad revenue might dry up, then the hefty payrolls for the trainers may disappear, and – much like Humpty Dumpty – David Howard’s empire would take a great fall. This is why the Shelbyville bunch is suing the USDA. This is why they are now furiously visiting senators and Congressmen and reminding them that “walking horse money” was donated to various election campaigns. And this is why horses are still being abused.

                                    When the villainous Jackie McConnell pleaded guilty to violating the federal Horse Protection Act on May 22, Howard somewhat innocently told Chattanooga TV station WRCB, "I'll be honest with you, we'll never get there. There's going to be somebody always cheating.”

                                    When Howard revealed his ace card, it caused the anti-soring segment to tighten its resolve. This summer it became a felony to abuse a horse in the state of Tennessee and last week federal judge Sandy Mattice ordered abuser John Mays to write a newspaper article about soring under the terms of his release. The USDA passed new rules for stricter judging, which could cause the Celebration to be decertified, and all summer long there has been one embarrassment after another.

                                    A couple of weeks ago Howard used his bully pulpit to boot Marty Irby – who heads the breed registry -- from the Celebration board and there are signs the intertwined leadership may soon be in disarray. Mike Inman, who insiders say is a shameless pawn for Howard, is the Celebration’s new CEO-elect and, in a newspaper interview last week, he said, “We need to focus on the positive and actively promote the performance horse. When you understand the (performance) package, the action device, when you put it in people's hands, they understand it, they get it, and accept it."

                                    Oh? Two of the largest equine veterinarian groups have already called for performance devices to be totally banned this summer, saying the unnatural stacks obviously inflame a horse’s legs and are easily altered to hide far worse abuse. “Have you ever seen a performance horse in a field? They don’t do the ‘Big Lick’ unless they are forced to do it,” offered one reader.

                                    But the scurrilous owners and trainers are adapting. With increased attention to violators, trainers are suddenly entering horses in the names of underlings, horse’s names are being easily changed, and clever methods are being used to escape detection of chronic abuse. The new swab tests are laughable, as is the fact the Celebration will use its own judges this year, three of which have known past violations of the Horse Protection Act.

                                    The Tennessee State Fair, which will be held in Nashville during September, will not even allow performance horses due to the public’s increasing disdain, and some states are introducing laws to curb the cheating and abuse that has spread elsewhere. Worse, the overwhelming majority of Walking Horse owners detest the ill-gotten reputation that has plagued the breed for a half-century and seem eager to disassociate from the Shelbyville groups and their agendas.

                                    Rumors continue to swirl. It has been confirmed the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation has obtained records and federal investigators, as well as USDA inspectors, will attend the Celebration in a continued effort to eradicate those who will cheat for money. It’s that simple. And they will sadistically “steward” any horse until they are forcibly stopped.

                                    royexum@aol.com
                                    from sunridge1 Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.

                                    Comment


                                    • Originally posted by WalkInTheWoods View Post
                                      http://chattanoogan.com/2012/8/12/23...re-Abused.aspx

                                      Roy Exum: Why Horses Are Abused
                                      Sunday, August 12, 2012 - by Roy Exum

                                      In the past three months I have taken a crash course called “Walking Horse Abuse 101” and by my tally I grade about a C-minus, which is almost average for anyone who thought a pastern was country way of saying where horses graze grass. It turns out a pastern is a tender part of a horse’s foot where evil people drive nails, insert golf balls or apply heavy pads so the animals will lift their painful front hooves in a very unnatural gait called “The Big Lick.”

                                      The biggest mystery to me is why anyone would sore a horse, but there is overwhelming evidence that caustic chemicals are routinely applied to the forelegs of performance horses in search of a grotesque dance that happens every August.
                                      I was drawn into the fray in May after seeing a horrendous videotape that shocked and angered the entire nation. Since then I have had thousands of “teachers” who, through private email, have bared a very revolting part of the Walking Horse industry to me.

                                      The public outcry has been incredible, lending credence to the notion this year’s National Celebration, which is slated to begin its 11-day run in Shelbyville on Aug. 22, will be unlike the shows of the past. The reason is the Shelbyville-based hierarchy is fighting with all its might against mounting pressure from every direction to finally clean up 50 years of abuse, corruption and the now-seedy image of the Walking Horse industry when, in fact, the defenseless horses are one of the most noble breeds in America.

                                      According to the Bible’s New Testament, 1st Timothy 6:10 starts "For the love of money is the root of all evil" and nothing could be closer to the truth when it comes to deliberately soring a horse. Just like some people go to the Indianapolis 500 to see the cars crash, there are those who go to Shelbyville to see the freaks.

                                      A growing number of trainers say “The Big Lick” can’t be achieved without the hideous and sadistic methods used to produce the unnatural stomping gait, but if the government – both on the state and Congressional level – succeeds in outlawing such depravity, some say Shelbyville’s house of cards could collapse and, according to enforcement official, that is where “the root of all evil” is located.

                                      The horse show has historically brought hundreds of thousands of dollars to Shelbyville’s distressed economy, but it also lines the pockets of those who are now so viciously fighting the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Humane Society of the United States, and a clamoring public to stop the vile abuse and eradicate once and for all the stacks, or pads, and action devices that cause horse lovers of other American breeds to angrily weep.

                                      David Howard, who has craftily wormed his way into the Walking Horse elite of Shelbyville, is today believed to be the ringleader of “The Big Lick” faction. He controls the Celebration board, which picks the judges for the show. He also owns the Walking Horse Report, that is chock full of expensive ads from hopeful owners and trainers, and he owns several other horse-related enterprises.

                                      If “The Big Lick” is eliminated, the crowds may not return to Shelbyville because there would be no more freaks, then the pages of ad revenue might dry up, then the hefty payrolls for the trainers may disappear, and – much like Humpty Dumpty – David Howard’s empire would take a great fall. This is why the Shelbyville bunch is suing the USDA. This is why they are now furiously visiting senators and Congressmen and reminding them that “walking horse money” was donated to various election campaigns. And this is why horses are still being abused.

                                      When the villainous Jackie McConnell pleaded guilty to violating the federal Horse Protection Act on May 22, Howard somewhat innocently told Chattanooga TV station WRCB, "I'll be honest with you, we'll never get there. There's going to be somebody always cheating.”

                                      When Howard revealed his ace card, it caused the anti-soring segment to tighten its resolve. This summer it became a felony to abuse a horse in the state of Tennessee and last week federal judge Sandy Mattice ordered abuser John Mays to write a newspaper article about soring under the terms of his release. The USDA passed new rules for stricter judging, which could cause the Celebration to be decertified, and all summer long there has been one embarrassment after another.

                                      A couple of weeks ago Howard used his bully pulpit to boot Marty Irby – who heads the breed registry -- from the Celebration board and there are signs the intertwined leadership may soon be in disarray. Mike Inman, who insiders say is a shameless pawn for Howard, is the Celebration’s new CEO-elect and, in a newspaper interview last week, he said, “We need to focus on the positive and actively promote the performance horse. When you understand the (performance) package, the action device, when you put it in people's hands, they understand it, they get it, and accept it."

                                      Oh? Two of the largest equine veterinarian groups have already called for performance devices to be totally banned this summer, saying the unnatural stacks obviously inflame a horse’s legs and are easily altered to hide far worse abuse. “Have you ever seen a performance horse in a field? They don’t do the ‘Big Lick’ unless they are forced to do it,” offered one reader.

                                      But the scurrilous owners and trainers are adapting. With increased attention to violators, trainers are suddenly entering horses in the names of underlings, horse’s names are being easily changed, and clever methods are being used to escape detection of chronic abuse. The new swab tests are laughable, as is the fact the Celebration will use its own judges this year, three of which have known past violations of the Horse Protection Act.

                                      The Tennessee State Fair, which will be held in Nashville during September, will not even allow performance horses due to the public’s increasing disdain, and some states are introducing laws to curb the cheating and abuse that has spread elsewhere. Worse, the overwhelming majority of Walking Horse owners detest the ill-gotten reputation that has plagued the breed for a half-century and seem eager to disassociate from the Shelbyville groups and their agendas.

                                      Rumors continue to swirl. It has been confirmed the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation has obtained records and federal investigators, as well as USDA inspectors, will attend the Celebration in a continued effort to eradicate those who will cheat for money. It’s that simple. And they will sadistically “steward” any horse until they are forcibly stopped.

                                      royexum@aol.com
                                      Thanks for posting that, you beat me to it. Roy sooo gets it!

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                                      • So it looks like it's Shelbyville Walking Horse vs. National Walking Horse. It will be interesting to see what the attendance numbers are at this year's "Celebration." A while back there was some discussion about concerned people attending and then just walking out for the Big Yuck/Sore Lick classes, but now it seems like the best course of action is to just not go.

                                        Reminds me of the old hippie saying, "What if they gave a war, and nobody came?"
                                        It's 2017. Do you know where your old horse is?

                                        www.streamhorsetv.com -- website with horse show livestream listings and links.

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                                        • Wonder if ROy will attend? It would be something else for him to accompany the USDA there - not that I would wish that on anyone. But I bet ROy would have incredible observations to write of.
                                          from sunridge1:Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.it is going to be good until the last drop!Eleneswell, the open trail begged to be used. D Taylor

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