• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Too heavy for my horse?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #41
    [QUOTE=Trakehner;3412068]The word is LOSE, not LOOSE!


    THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!! This is BASIC grade school grammar, people!

    And by the way, YES, that is WAY too heavy to be riding. My husband is 225 lbs and has already been told he will not be allowed on my 3 yr old andalusian. EVER.

    Comment


    • #42
      "I think a lot of the weight advice given here is bad. We're a society that hates fat; if losing it were as simple as cutting out soda, nobody would be fat. Losing weight is hard, but it's fairly unique in that people who accomplish it (however temporarily) always want to emphasize how simple it is. In contrast to, say, drunks, who place a ton of emphasis on how hard it is for them to not drink, fat people are forever trying to believe that it'd be simple for them to eat in moderation and exercise appropriately."

      Losing weight and becoming fit is NOT easy or else there wouldn't be a multi-billion dollar industry dedicated to ripping off people who are desperately looking for an easy way to lose weight. I appreciate the post about being overweight not defining who your are...it is something you CAN change like your hairstyle, although it is much more difficult. Most people have trouble finding the will or stamina to make the hard choices every day all along the way that will effect the change they want. Again, it's all about choices, and as a society we do want to have our cake and eat it too and still be skinny.

      In this situation, it's important to realize that it is not about being skinny or looking a certain way but about physics and health of both horse and rider. A 260 pound woman is not healthy. Period. There may be no obvious disease at this point, but it's there. It's not easy to make changes, but you can make little changes here and there. People do it successfully, but most people wind up making excuses for why they simply must have this or that in this moment (for example, a 20-oz. 250 calorie soft drink rather than water or an 800 calorie frappacino rather than a 100 calorie latte with skim milk) and continually sabotage their own efforts.

      It is hard, but you have two individuals whose health are at stake...yours and your horse's. If you can't do it for yourself, make good choices for your horse. Sometimes we need an external motivator because we don't have the self-esteem or confidence we need to do things only for ourselves. So let your horse help you and you will help him. It is not easy, it is emotionally harder than just about anything, but you can do it! The formula is simple...move more, eat less. It's doing it that is the hard part and usually it's hard for emotional reasons that are very complicated. But the fix is still the same...DO IT!!! Never mind how you got here, the way to fix it is simple but not easy. Small steps will lead to long term health for both you and your horse, and you cannot afford to wait any longer. Making excuses isn't going to help when you develop type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure or clogged arteries or all of the above. You can change this, but it won't be easy. You will do much better if you enlist the help of your doctor, a registered dietician and a qualified personal trainer. Get a team of support and do your best to make good choices in small ways every day. It will add up over the long term to better health. The hardest part will be deciding that it matters enough to really follow through and then doing it.

      Comment


      • #43
        In my experience, it really isn't the weight of the rider but how well balanced the rider is. The 20% rule applies mainly to pack horses, because they are packing dead weight which cannot move around to help them stay balanced going up or down hills.

        I have a new little qh mare, about 14.2 right now (age 3) and with my heavy western saddle and self, my calculation is she's carrying 21%. And she is happy as a clam and not complaining or indicating any soreness, any where. And when I rode her in the woods yesterday behind a big 16h quarter horse- well it's been a while but can I digress long enough to say how very pleasant it is to be on a short horse in the woods?

        If there is soreness in hocks and/or back, yes, too much weight could be an issue. But there's more to consider: I have a good friend who was quite heavy, 250 or so anyway, but she and her horse made a good pair on the trails anyway. But, on one of our montly group rides, another horse and rider had some trouble, and a light bulb went on in my friend's head- at her size and weight, she couldn't help herself or her horse if there were some trouble. She did the gastric bypass in combination with a change in diet and a daily exercise program and is about 145 now and pleased that she undertook all that hard work.

        Comment


        • #44
          Why are people so cruel to those with weight problems? Most likely the ones being cruel, have no problems and don't understand. those that had babies and lost it...good for you, but your body's metabolism is made to be lighter, and that's why it was easier for you to loose the weight, it's the weight you're supposed to be at.
          Wow, hum- first thing, no most fit cowboys do not ride better than fit women- I worked with cowboys for many years, and actually a lot of them didn't ride very well at all- they were "self taught" and tended to rely to much on the their hands and spurs...

          Also- why do you assume that the OP eats like crap just because she is overweight?
          I agree...
          To the OP, keep riding-it's good exercise, slowly loose the weight, it'll be easier. My cousin took about 4yrs to loose all her weight, and she has kept it off. Another cousin did the gastric bypass-and has gained alot back. Weight problems run in the family-both sides.
          Keep your head up!
          Equine Massage Therapy Classes and Rehab for Horses
          http://www.midwestnha.wordpress.com[/INDENT]

          Comment


          • #45
            yes, weight problems tend to run in families, but so do eating habits. Eating too many calories causes fat. Very simple. Watch heavy people at restaurants and observe. Quit kidding yourself, people. Be fair to your horse.
            (Flame suit on now)

            Comment


            • #46
              I think a lot of it has to do with your personal perception of yourself riding. If you're at the point where you feel like you're too fat to ride your horse, then it's time to lose weight. Worrying what you look like at competitions and riding out has to weigh heavily on your self-esteem and make it less fun for you. I know what that is like, I was very very overweight in middle school/early high school and always worried what people were saying about me when I went in the ring.

              I'm not saying that you're too heavy for your horse, because I haven't seen him. But, I think if it comes to a point where you feel you need to ask that question under an alias on a public bb - you're already suffering a loss of confidence and worry about your riding in front of other people. I think whatever people on here say, you're going to feel the same way.

              Comment


              • #47
                Originally posted by coloredhorse View Post
                As I read KR's post, she was comparing fit large male cowboys to less-fit large woman riders, and the comparison was not of riding ability but just the straight burden on the horse.
                did you read the paretheses where she said that a fit cowboy rides better than most fit women? That's what I was responding to

                Originally posted by coloredhorse View Post
                I've not seen anything mean-spirited or suggesting the OP "eats like crap" or any such.
                Did you read this?

                Originally posted by King's Ransom View Post
                . Cut out all the fast food, all the junk food, all the soda pop. Drink tons of water. Count calories. I'll bet, at 260 lbs, you can lose 30 lbs fairly quickly just by cleaning up your diet and getting 60 minutes of exercise per day.

                Originally posted by coloredhorse View Post
                The other factor is that the OP notes that her horse has current back and hock soreness. In such a horse, looking strictly at the weight he is asked to carry ... discounting muscle versus fat, excellent rider versus poor, etc. ... just looking at the weight of the load and setting a strict limit on that load is a good idea.
                And a horse with a thin/fit rider has never had hock or back issues?

                Comment


                • #48
                  Originally posted by springer View Post
                  yes, weight problems tend to run in families, but so do eating habits. Eating too many calories causes fat. Very simple. Watch heavy people at restaurants and observe. Quit kidding yourself, people. Be fair to your horse.
                  (Flame suit on now)

                  ... and watch all the heavier people who seem to barely eat anything and still maintain weight. Go do some research on PCOS, hypothyroid and diabetes before you make blanket claims like that

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    Most likely the ones being cruel, have no problems and don't understand.
                    I have issues. I need to lose the weight. It is hard. It is not easy. And any time anyone sits there and says "oh, it is OK" or "Hey- you can be fit and fat". Bottom line- metabolism or what not, our bodies are NOT meant to carry excess weight. That is why we limit our horse's, cats and dog's food- because excess fat puts stress on all of our systems. It is no different for people.

                    I don't think that being fat means you are bad- it means you have a health problem. a 5'7 woman weighing 260 is a lot different than one weighing 160.

                    It is hard to take the inititive to lose weight and the mixed messages are confusing. One person says - "embrace being yourself", one person says "umm- if you aren't 120lbs you are a cow". The truth is that being skinny does not equal healthy and it is very difficult to be healthy when your body is carrying too much excess weight. And being skinny does not make you a good rider, but all things equal- it is easier for your horse to carry as little of you as possible, while still allowing yourself good muscle tone and fitness.

                    http://www.flickr.com/photos/25160020@N02/2394243426/

                    That is me, at my current weight of around 200lbs on my horse. My body control is an issue. She canters much nicer for my lighter friends who have better control. She goes beautifully and round for my friend who weighs about 110 lbs. I'm relatively fit- I've done a marathon, a half marathon (well, 3 of those). But I still have fat- and excess fat makes it harder to stay balanced and steady. Am I flopping around up there? No. But it is still enough for my greenie to feel small balance shifts and be confused. I think I am OK to ride, but realize that weight does impact the performance of a horse. And I do believe that there is a point where you weigh too much- and that is when you can start seeing physical issues that are arising due to the horse carring an excess load.

                    Comment


                    • #50
                      You know what else is interesting? Those of you who want to be so "pc" and not be "cruel" to the overweight people? Take your argument to Mother Nature! Why, it's downright cruel that morbidly obese people get struck with diabetes, heart disease, kidney failure, fatty liver, asthma, sleep apnea, and joint problems! WHY should someone end up in a wheel chair carting around an oxygen tank just because they are obese????!!!!

                      That is so not fair! Don't you know that some people just have a hard time losing the weight???

                      Yes, it's true. It's hard. Especially in our society where we think it's "normal" to eat 1,500 calories at one meal. It's difficult. But that does not mean it's healthy to be obese. You can't change the facts just because you don't like them, or they might hurt someone's feelings.

                      I have a friend who lost 180 lbs and is now in the fitness industry, helping others. Do you know what the turning point was for her? Her "aha!" moment? She was walking out of a convenience store one night, with her usual junk food snack, and a homeless person was sitting outside on the sidewalk. He hollered out to her, "Lady, you got too MUCH food!"

                      Sure, it was cruel. And embarrassing. And it broke her heart. And a lot of you on this board would have been quick to rush to her side and say, "Oh, how awful of him to say that. You're a good person! Be proud of yourself. You can't help it.'

                      Well, to you, I say, STOP IT! That homeless person shook her up. She got busy. She is not a helpless victim. She is a capable person who needed a wake up call. The OP got a wake up call when someone suggested she should stop riding her horse. The best thing we can do for her is encourage her, give any advice we know of, and cheerlead her efforts. Telling her that the mean old person shouldn't have said that is only prolonging something that any thinking person KNOWS is unhealthy and leads to a bad end -- both for her and for her horse.

                      And GG -- you have my condolensces that you simply have not seen the kind of fit cowboys ride that I have. I must be very privileged, because I live in cowboy country and ... well ... the eye candy alone is worth the price of admission!

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        Originally posted by tweeter View Post
                        I've seen some incredibly heavy people at shows. On the ground they looked so heavy I promised myself to watch their ride. 95% of them were beautiful riders, so nice that I never noticed their weight! I'd kill to ride as well as they do Their horses looked happy and relaxed, definitely not stressed by the weight they were carrying.
                        I agree, I have taught some people that are very thin /average for their height and they ride like wet noodles. No balance or coordination whatsoever. Yet I have seen and taught larger riders that will put you to bed in the hunter ring. Try to work on posture and balance at the walk. Drop your stirrups, drop your reins. Learn how to position yourself while mounted to stay light on your horses back and mouth, post softly and remember to take deep breaths, this will enable you to move WITH your horse instead of against him obviously insureing a more comfortable, happier ride. ....actually every rider whatever their weight should be working on that.
                        Corner Stone Farm
                        Weeki Wachee,FL .Follow us on FB!

                        Comment


                        • #52
                          Back to the OP...

                          You know, if you are thinking there is some truth to that (really) rude statement you need to lose 50 pounds and not ride until you do? I'm thinking you are thinking you do need to lose some weight.

                          PC stuff aside and am not talking stupid, self destructive dieting and/or self image problems, maybe OP does need to lose weight to be effective as a rider who wants to do lower level Eventing.

                          We are talking galloping and jumping here and, despite some examples stated, you really do NOT see obese riders jumping in competition. Oh, heavy for sure, not obese. And for those that overreact and cite the anorexia and all that? Not what I am talking about at all...because I really don't see that many that are too skinny either-and there is such a thing because effective riding requires strength.

                          I just dropped 10 pounds because I started getting serious about riding and jumping again (had a few injuries to work through...packed on a few pounds). I should drop another 10 and my horse would probably say 20. I am no stick either.

                          Doubt that any rider would say their horse enjoys carrying extra weight and most of us know we could lose at least little and get more fit.

                          So for OP, go see your doctor and be sensible about getting back to a good fitness level that helps you and your horse and that will involve dropping weight. Small steps on a program you can stick to.

                          And KEEP RIDING. Good excercise...but maybe not jump or gallop alot. For the sake of the horse, not the jerk that made the remark.
                          When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                          The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                          Comment


                          • #53
                            why a 260lb man is sometimes ok but a 260lb woman is sometimes not

                            Assuming the person who spoke to the OP is a respected horseperson (and not some snide 12yr old railbird who's just being cruel), then the OP needs to respect the courage and concern it took for that person to speak up. I think she should try riding bareback-- and if she can't stay centered on her horse bareback then she has proof positive that she is NOT RIDING IN BALANCE.

                            What we are really discussing is Center of Gravity (CoG). The OP has already said she's "short." At 260lb on a short frame, all of her weight is centered in a ball right on that horse's back. There is a general rule of thumb that each leg accounts for 10% of human body weight. On a taller, leaner rider (of equal weight!), their long legs serve to lower their center of gravity to about the L-2 (lumbar) vertebrae. This is not very far up from the butt. For a short, obese woman, her CoG is probably closer to her upper torso or even chest.

                            Riding in balance with our horse means keeping our CoG as close as possible to the horse's CoG. The further apart our CoG moves from the horse's CoG, the more muscle and mechanical assistance (grabbing the mane, bracing against the cantle of the saddle, etc) we need to keep from falling off. Same is true of the horse--when we are not in balance with him, he needs to strain HIS muscles more too. Aside from CoG, rider's longer legs can help anchor the rider better around the barrel to prevent excess movement of our upper body.

                            All this theory aside, I jump judged at a USEA horse trial all day Saturday and was the scribe for the stadium jumping judge all day Sunday, so I got to watch rider after rider go, every 2 minutes for 2 days. I was not looking for this, but it definitely stood out to me that every single short&heavy rider--despite being clearly skilled technically, and despite being clearly good, caring horsewomen--every single one of them was loose in the tack and shifted around much more on the horses' back. Most unfortunately, they also tended to balance on the reins (though I have to say in general I saw a LOT of no-release, hanging on reins riding this weekend . Bottom line, the horses carrying short&heavy riders went much less freely than the horses carrying taller/lighter riders.

                            I disagree that the trainer or others are likely to bring the topic up. As many have noted, it's an incredibly difficult and hurtful thing to hear. Hell even doctors often don't say anything-- we are most of us quite averse to having difficult conversations or starting conflict.

                            Comment


                            • #54
                              HH -- thank you so much for the logical explanation about CoG. It's intuitive, but I hadn't ever seen it explained that way. Makes a LOT of sense. And explains a lot to me about the problems I did have when I was jumping, and was overweight. And how King had to be constantly compensating for me. A saint he was, that one! Now, I am feeling so guilty, I'd better run out to the barn and make sure his fan is on and he has apple juice to drink and his fly mask is adjusted just-so ... God love him!

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                I give props to the OP for recognizing that there is a problem. Also props to the people who didn't sugar coat it for her. There are riders out there who don't even consider the fact that they might be too heavy for their horses, not to mention, they aren't at all fit or even try to be. It's shocking, but the thought that they may be too heavy/unfit never even enters their heads.

                                It *is* difficult to lose weight. It requires a whole lifestyle change. As an eventer, I'm sure you realize that you need to be as athletic as your horse. Really, for any equestrian discipline you need to be fit, but imo, eventing even more so. Getting in shape and dropping the weight will improve your riding enormously. That should be a lot of incentive to you right there. It's really tough but let your riding motivate you. I know I do! I have a dressage picture taped to my fridge.

                                Try to get some support system going. There are plenty of weight loss BBs on the net. Fitday is a great site to keep track of your calories and exercise. Motivation is imperative. I'm visual so I need pictures to inspire me. Another thing is rewards. If I run/workout the days I've planned and distance, without fail, I treat myself to something: a new book, manicure, magazines, whatever gets you going. Keep a journal of your progress. It holds me accountable. I know some may not agree with this, but I weigh every morning without fail. Even once a week can be good though. When you start dropping the pounds it will light a fire under you.

                                Good luck!

                                Comment


                                • #56
                                  Nice pic Magnolia- you look great. Well, since the OP is having physical problems with the horse, Id have to say yes, its too much for him. Light riding on the flat, and every day work would probably be best. That said,I would drive him. It will strengthen him, you will be doing something with him. Plus, its pretty fun. Or line drive him while walking behind. Both of you will be working! BTW Im a heavier rider too.

                                  Comment


                                  • #57
                                    I know lots of 250 pound people who run and jump carrying more than 60 pounds. They're called medieval reenactors. Not all of them are all that fit, either.

                                    OP, if you're just looking at numbers, I don't think 260 pounds is too heavy for a stout 1100 pound horse. I know mountain horses who carry that much or more with a rider and packs, and those packs are dead weight. Of course they're not galloping and jumping, but they're climbing some crazy steep and difficult trails. That said, if your horse is sore something is going on, and no one should be jumping him until you find out what it is (if you haven't already). Maybe do what others have said and take this time to do lots of ground work with him, long walks and ground driving, to help him work out that soreness and you get some exercise in.

                                    I'm not going to criticize you for being overweight and eventing, as you yourself have said that you need to lose the weight. I think you need to figure out why your horse is hurting, and that will tell you whether you're too heavy for the horse or not.
                                    exploring the relationship between horse and human

                                    Comment


                                    • #58
                                      Originally posted by King's Ransom View Post
                                      You know what else is interesting? Those of you who want to be so "pc" and not be "cruel" to the overweight people? Take your argument to Mother Nature! Why, it's downright cruel that morbidly obese people get struck with diabetes, heart disease, kidney failure, fatty liver, asthma, sleep apnea, and joint problems! WHY should someone end up in a wheel chair carting around an oxygen tank just because they are obese????!!!!

                                      That is so not fair! Don't you know that some people just have a hard time losing the weight???

                                      Yes, it's true. It's hard. Especially in our society where we think it's "normal" to eat 1,500 calories at one meal. It's difficult. But that does not mean it's healthy to be obese. You can't change the facts just because you don't like them, or they might hurt someone's feelings.

                                      I have a friend who lost 180 lbs and is now in the fitness industry, helping others. Do you know what the turning point was for her? Her "aha!" moment? She was walking out of a convenience store one night, with her usual junk food snack, and a homeless person was sitting outside on the sidewalk. He hollered out to her, "Lady, you got too MUCH food!"

                                      Sure, it was cruel. And embarrassing. And it broke her heart. And a lot of you on this board would have been quick to rush to her side and say, "Oh, how awful of him to say that. You're a good person! Be proud of yourself. You can't help it.'

                                      Well, to you, I say, STOP IT! That homeless person shook her up. She got busy. She is not a helpless victim. She is a capable person who needed a wake up call. The OP got a wake up call when someone suggested she should stop riding her horse. The best thing we can do for her is encourage her, give any advice we know of, and cheerlead her efforts. Telling her that the mean old person shouldn't have said that is only prolonging something that any thinking person KNOWS is unhealthy and leads to a bad end -- both for her and for her horse.

                                      And GG -- you have my condolensces that you simply have not seen the kind of fit cowboys ride that I have. I must be very privileged, because I live in cowboy country and ... well ... the eye candy alone is worth the price of admission!

                                      Silly me, I thought this board could be held to higher standards and a levels of tact that one would assume from a homeless person.

                                      I have an aunt 5'6 115 lbs. very healthy- works out all the time, eats right etc. last summer she had an emergency triple bypass and is now diagnosed with advanced heart disease- genetics have a LOT to do with it as well!!! Certainly being healthy and in shape helped her, but it did not prevent her from the disease.

                                      Kings Ramsom- clearly you have made a huge change in your life for the better- and good for you. I mean that honestly, I think what you have done is wonderful and your energy and excitement about this change in your life comes through in writing where there is not tone or inflection of voice.

                                      My issue is that I don't think it is fair to assume that everyone who is overweight eats bigmacs, junk food and drinks soda- there are may factors that can be in play, low metabolism, diesase, medication etc. as well as perhaps easting well but just eating too much.

                                      It is a very basic science, we need to output more than we input- so if we don't get a lot of excercise and we east too much we will put on weight. And yes, you can get fat on eating too much fruit...

                                      Lastly-- I have seen very nice fit cowboys ride, as I said- I worked on ranches for several years- and also lived in "Cowboy country" as you say. (colorado, Wyoming, Arizona...)I just found fault with your blanket statement that they ride better than women --although they might look good doing it-they aren't better riders-many of then even commented on that - that they didn't have the formal training in riding and didn't sit a saddle quite as nicely.

                                      Comment


                                      • #59
                                        Wait, what was the topic again?

                                        If your horse is showing signs of soreness, all bets are off. Percentages don't matter.

                                        Now, I don't think that this soreness necessarily means that you're too large and are harming your horse. Not one bit. But you need to consider the fitness of your horse when riding.

                                        I am a larger rider, and the horse I ride is perfectly fit to carry my 200lbs over small jumps, and we have a wonderful time. But there are at least two horses at my barn who I wouldn't dream of jumping, even over the tiniest of crossrails. It's not my place, as a big girl, to be jumping horses with hock issues. Yes, balance makes a profound difference, but when you have joint problems, weight matters a whole helluva lot, too.

                                        So long as you can take care of the physical issues with your horse, I don't think you should stop riding. I applaud you for being aware enough to ask, and to consider the impact your riding might be having. But make sure you get to the bottom of these things, for your horse's sake.

                                        Comment


                                        • #60
                                          I think that if you are even questioning whether you are too large to ride your horse than you know in your heart that you are. He is already having physical issues so it would be best for both of you to take some time off until you lose weight.

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X