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Lethal Horse Show Injuries -Are we better or worse?

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  • Lethal Horse Show Injuries -Are we better or worse?

    I was sent this:

    "Ages ago in Springfield, MA a 3 year old stallion, the only horse owned by a young person, being schooled in Halter on the concrete aisle flipped over, hit his head and just laid there with feet paddling sporadically. He died.

    I researched and tried to generate interest and funds for an equine ambulance for the region. While I recognise these types of accidents are not frequent, TG, there are enough to make you stop and think - What can be done! We have a people ambulance on standby at local horse shows and athletic events.

    Has anything changed in 30+ years to help our equine athletes receive life saving intervention?"

  • #2
    I think in some of the flip-over cases, something organic (like an aneurism or ???) caused the horse to flip in the first place, and horse would die regardless of intervention. This happened to a friend of mine- a driving horse with no history of silliness, simply being jogged at a horse show by the trainer, just flipped on pavement and was dead almost immediately. At another show I returned from the rest room to dead silence around the ring- a youngish horse, in her prime with a trainer on board during a class- simply fell out from under the trainer. Again, dead almost immediately. I doubt any ambulance could have saved them. Maybe an ambulance could save a catastophic leg injury (IF the owner could afford and chose to go that route), but I don't think it's really feasible to have a horse ambulance at your average show or event.

    Comment


    • #3
      Good grief, if you see a need, "someone" should do something about it, if you see the need, do it yourself, get involved.

      There are already vets at horse shows. A Horse ambulance is a vet and a trailer.
      My warmbloods have actually drunk mulled wine in the past. Not today though. A drunk warmblood is a surly warmblood. - WildandWickedWarmbloods

      Comment


      • #4
        What is anyone doing about injuries/deaths at shows?

        Veterinarians on site
        Farriers on site
        Equine ambulances on site
        Stewards
        Extraordinary advances in veterinary medicine that results in more horses being saved.
        Drug rules
        Drug testing
        Individual disciplines working on sport specific measures to reduce the risk of participating in the sport.

        Unfortunately, no one has developed a plan to overcome the laws of physics. Or breed horses incapable of flipping over and cracking their skull.
        Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
        Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
        -Rudyard Kipling

        Comment


        • #5
          Well since lethal=dead I don't think there has been much advancement in the technique of fixing dead in any species. So no, we aren't better or worse. WWJD?
          McDowell Racing Stables

          Home Away From Home

          Comment


          • #6
            Equine ambulances are pretty common in Eventing. Everything from a designated, but "normal", truck and trailer to a fully equipped ambulance from a medical school.

            But in the case of an aneurism or a broken neck, there is not much even a fully equipped ambulance can do.
            Janet

            chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).

            Comment


            • #7
              What is with the snarkiness?? OP asked a legitimate question.

              I'd say a lot has been done; things are being made safer all the time (collapsible jumps, breakaway jump cups, better footing, etc.) We do have a HEART horse ambulance at the bigger shows here; see equineambulance.com. It would be cost prohibitive at a smaller show, I'm sure.

              Unfortunately, for the situation you describe, nothing can help those horses. Something like that probably would have happened whether he was at home or on the showgrounds.

              Comment


              • #8
                The snarkiness comes from past posts by the OP. Take a look at the posting history.

                Comment


                • #9
                  And just how was the horse in the OP going to be put on the ambulance?

                  I think the way the first post was worded, it sounded like the person thought this down-on-the-ground thrashing horse could've been strapped to a stretcher like a human and carried on to an ambulance and driven to the hospital.

                  JSwan's response is a good one.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JSwan View Post
                    What is anyone doing about injuries/deaths at shows?

                    Veterinarians on site
                    Farriers on site
                    Equine ambulances on site
                    Stewards
                    Extraordinary advances in veterinary medicine that results in more horses being saved.
                    Drug rules
                    Drug testing
                    Individual disciplines working on sport specific measures to reduce the risk of participating in the sport..
                    I agree with this and would like to add that judges and stewards will also disqualify a visibly lame horse.

                    Unfortunately freak accidents happen and probably always will. Some things with horses sadly cannot be prevented
                    Fils Du Reverdy (Revy)- 1993 Selle Francais Gelding
                    My equine soulmate
                    Mischief Managed (Tully)- JC Priceless Jewel 2002 TB Gelding

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Race tracks have equine ambulances and I feel at minimum the big shows/ Regionals should have one on the grounds but that is not so.

                      A vet does not come with his own trailer in tow. Nor one that is equipped with a sling capable of keeping a horse up, a moveable hydraulic floor so a down horse can be moved and transported to a Univ. or other suitable treatment facility. The show vet is limited in treatments he can perform in the field.

                      And yep, Anne, that's exactly what was done to the stallion mentioned. He unfortunately had a fractured skull and was euthanized at the Univ.

                      And thank you, caryledee, Janet and shakeytails for your post.

                      Summary: Doesn't sound like much change has occurred over the years.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Roadapple Cider View Post
                        And yep, Anne, that's exactly what was done to the stallion mentioned. He unfortunately had a fractured skull and was euthanized at the Univ.

                        And thank you, caryledee, Janet and shakeytails for your post.

                        Summary: Doesn't sound like much change has occurred over the years.
                        I disagree with the summary. See JSwan's post for the list of reasons why.
                        Of course there are freak accidents, but in my fairly extensive show experience, I can't recall any instances where an equine ambulance would have come in handy. OTOH, The human ambulances have been used quite a few times over the years though.

                        Sure there are equine ambulances at racetracks and upper level events - because statically those activities are more likely to result in traumatic breakdowns thank a dressage or open show. It simply isn't cost effective (especially in this economy) to own or rent and maintain a specialty vehicle that will see use maybe once every five years. As a competitor, I'd prefer to see the money put towards improving footing, drug testing and hiring trained TDs.

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          I read his post amm2cd but those mentioned were also available 30 years ago.

                          Another instance where an equine ambulance with sling would have been helpful is a horse with a broken leg. This was at a Regional show down South.

                          I can go along with footing - there have been improvements there but why can't we have both? Without the horse, you don't need the footing/ drug testing- unless it's for the rider.

                          What's different - What's the same ............not much imo

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Roadapple Cider View Post
                            I read his post amm2cd but those mentioned were also available 30 years ago.

                            Another instance where an equine ambulance with sling would have been helpful is a horse with a broken leg. This was at a Regional show down South.

                            I can go along with footing - there have been improvements there but why can't we have both? Without the horse, you don't need the footing/ drug testing- unless it's for the rider.

                            What's different - What's the same ............not much imo
                            Without the horse?
                            I guess I am not seeing the issue you are having here.

                            It is OBVIOUS that much has changed in 30 years regarding safety measures for horses(and riders) in the show ring. What will never change is the unpredictability of the horse.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              External coaptation for potentially repairable fractures can be done without need of an equine ambulance.
                              The horse can then be transported on a plain vanilla trailer.
                              "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

                              ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Ghazzu View Post
                                External coaptation for potentially repairable fractures can be done without need of an equine ambulance.
                                The horse can then be transported on a plain vanilla trailer.
                                I agree -
                                http://www.equinebracing.com/wp-cont...Management.pdf

                                Probably not much need to justify the expense of an Equine Ambulance (what's your guess - $50K?) at most horse shows.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
                                  The snarkiness comes from past posts by the OP. Take a look at the posting history.
                                  This post is so juvenile. Do you keep notes on posters that irk you too?
                                  Last edited by lifesabreeze; Apr. 4, 2012, 11:01 PM. Reason: clarification as to which post I am opining as juvenile

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Prognosis - NOT GOOD even with superior care but all I am sure remember the gorgeous blk and white pony with the prosthetic leg.

                                    Despite significant advances in fracture repair, open and severely displaced
                                    long bone fractures in adult horses still have a grave prognosis. Open fractures
                                    of the radius and tibia, in particular, have a poor prognosis. The weight and
                                    temperament of the horse can also factor into the prognosis, with lighter
                                    horses (!400–600 lb) and those with a calm temperament having a better
                                    prognosis [5]

                                    That's super if your horse's injury fits into a transportable condition, can be stabilized with heavy wrapping/ makeshift cast. But what happens when you can't and the weight must be taken off the injured limb. What happens when the horse is so drugged to control pain and prevent further injury, they can't stand? You need a more specialized rig.

                                    And you are all are right in part. We have seen advances in all areas of equine care.

                                    The person above had tried to help fill a need. The ambulance would have been donated but no one took the time to respond.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      You were referring to yourself in the third person in your previous post?

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        More likely than not a "non-transportable" fracture is also non-repairable.
                                        However, if you have the desire and the means to provide an equine ambulance gratis to every equine competition, please, feel free to do so.
                                        "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

                                        ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

                                        Comment

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