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Nervous - Venturing back into horse-ownership. What should I remember that I don't?

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  • Nervous - Venturing back into horse-ownership. What should I remember that I don't?



    Looks like I may very well be jumping back into horse ownership. It's been 3 years since I last owned a horse (2009).

    Going in the morning to check out a cute little mare. Anything I should know about mares? I've only owned geldings.

    Going to be nervous, since the last time I was around a horse I nearly lost my face! I know I should stay calm, but I'm a bit of a Nervous Nellie since that last incident. I didn't even go out to see the last horse go. I stayed home and had a glass of wine!

    Tell me I'm being silly, please!
    I walk into the barn and hear her soothing nicker, feel her soft muzzle against my cheek, her warm breath on my skin, and it is at that moment I realize there is no where else I would rather be.

  • #2
    You're not being silly. If you're a Nervous Nellie, all the more reason to pay attention to your gut instinct.

    When you've lost confidence, for whatever reason, it's *really* important to buy a horse that can help give it back to you. Don't accept crappy ground manners or anything that makes you worry while you're riding.

    When you test-ride a horse, you should want to stay on All Day Long. Take that one home and don't accept less.

    Good luck!
    Patience pays.

    Comment


    • #3
      What about finding a lease horse you can use for some time, gain some confidence back and really see if your ready for ownership?

      Or a lease to own situation?
      www.facebook.com/doggonegoodgoodies
      http://doggonebakedgoods.com/

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Originally posted by MunchingonHay View Post
        What about finding a lease horse you can use for some time, gain some confidence back and really see if your ready for ownership?

        Or a lease to own situation?
        I've been hanging around some of my horse friends and riding on their horses as well as spending time. I'm just a complete worry-wart. After my last purchase gone bad, I feel I should be. Drugged horses were no fun, especially for the inexperienced teen.

        Plus, the people I have found wanting to lease their horses out are asking for you to only ride while taking lessons with them or "he is green-broke and I don't have time to ride. You must ride horse 4 days a week" type of deals.

        I'm not willing to be someone-else's crash test dummy.
        I walk into the barn and hear her soothing nicker, feel her soft muzzle against my cheek, her warm breath on my skin, and it is at that moment I realize there is no where else I would rather be.

        Comment


        • #5
          Always bring an experienced friend or trainer with you to see the horse before you buy. You can look at the horse by yourself at the first visit. If you like the horse, get the experienced person to go back with you for the second visit. You will miss important details if you go by yourself. Try to check the reputation of the seller. Some sellers are very good at matching horses and owners. Others regularly sell lame, sedated, or unsuitable horses to inexperienced potential owners. Get a good prepurchase exam done before buying, using a veterinarian who is known as a good judge of horse health.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by PinkMartini View Post
            I've been hanging around some of my horse friends and riding on their horses as well as spending time. I'm just a complete worry-wart. After my last purchase gone bad, I feel I should be. Drugged horses were no fun, especially for the inexperienced teen.

            Plus, the people I have found wanting to lease their horses out are asking for you to only ride while taking lessons with them or "he is green-broke and I don't have time to ride. You must ride horse 4 days a week" type of deals.

            I'm not willing to be someone-else's crash test dummy.
            I see, I miss read your OP.


            I agree to take a friend with you, an extra set of eyes and someone you can trust is priceless.
            www.facebook.com/doggonegoodgoodies
            http://doggonebakedgoods.com/

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Originally posted by AKB View Post
              Always bring an experienced friend or trainer with you to see the horse before you buy. You can look at the horse by yourself at the first visit. If you like the horse, get the experienced person to go back with you for the second visit. You will miss important details if you go by yourself. Try to check the reputation of the seller. Some sellers are very good at matching horses and owners. Others regularly sell lame, sedated, or unsuitable horses to inexperienced potential owners. Get a good prepurchase exam done before buying, using a veterinarian who is known as a good judge of horse health.
              I got family on their way down from GA in the AM. I'm going in the AM myself to see if I like her, then if I do my cousin-in-law is going to go back with me and tell me what he thinks.
              I walk into the barn and hear her soothing nicker, feel her soft muzzle against my cheek, her warm breath on my skin, and it is at that moment I realize there is no where else I would rather be.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Melissa.Hare.Jones View Post
                When you've lost confidence, for whatever reason, it's *really* important to buy a horse that can help give it back to you. Don't accept crappy ground manners or anything that makes you worry while you're riding.

                When you test-ride a horse, you should want to stay on All Day Long. Take that one home and don't accept less.

                Good luck!
                This, precisely. Look at horses who are already doing what you want to do with a horse, and find the one who's doing it quietly with a "yes ma'am" sort of pleasant attitude.
                Full-time bargain hunter.

                Comment

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