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no flip flops in the barn

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  • #41
    You could try getting a pair or two of Gore-Tex socks. While not perfect, they do help.

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    • #42
      Jeebus Jackie, sounds like hell!

      My niece was in her late 20s when that happened. Crazy horse she purchased, he was a nasty piece of work and had been trying to kill her for some time. He bolted when she was mounting, she had one foot in the stirrup and was swinging the other over when he bolted. She didn't panic, just did a push off to dismount on the run. Landed on her feet, but her ankle rolled. The ankle bones all broke on impact and her shin bone shot through her now-rolled ankle and actually imbedded into the ground. Momentum made her fall back on her butt but her leg bone in the ground kept her in one spot.

      Only thing holding her foot on was the skin. But she did have some good luck, when she got to the hospital one of the state's top orthopedic surgeons had just finished an operation and they caught him before he left. He even says he doesn't know how he saved her foot. She's all metal in that lower leg and ankle. Plates right under the skin so she has to be careful in winter because they freeze, no fat over them. Maybe 10-15% range of motion left, she walks like Frankenstein in riding boots but can walk better in those rocking-sole shoes. She didn't ride for about 15 months or so and then got right back into it. She runs a lesson/boarding barn of her own right now, mostly kids. And she rides. She was scared for a while though.

      She was kind of funny when it happened...she was screaming (obviously) and her fiance called the ambulance and then her mom to tell her. He gave my niece the phone (her mom is an RN) and my niece explained in a tight but controlled voice that she could see her bone, nobody should see their own bones, her bone was stuck in the ground and she'd have to talk to her mom later because she had to go back to screaming. Tough kid.

      How's your leg now? Catastrophic injuries suck.
      You jump in the saddle,
      Hold onto the bridle!
      Jump in the line!
      ...Belefonte

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      • #43
        Originally posted by JackieBlue View Post
        Another good warning as we all load into our trucks and trailers and head to the spring and summer shows....don't EVER rest your feet/legs on the dash in a vehicle! You will NOT have time to move them in the event of an accident!! You can't even see all the other breaks up high in the attached rad.
        Yikes!

        No pictures, but another safety traveling tip. I typed the ER report, the op note, and the discharge summary on this patient years ago, and have never forgotten it. When riding in a car with windows open, NEVER hang onto the top of the open window frame with your hand. In a rollover accident, you will reflexively tighten down instead of pulling your hand safely back in, and the full weight of the vehicle will roll over your fingers and not only shatter your hand to smithereens but drive it into the ground to contaminate the whole wound.

        Her hand was a beanbag with multiple contaminated open fractures; doc commented that several small pieces of bone were actually missing, no doubt still back in the ground where the car rolled on her. That patient had extensive hand reconstruction surgery, probably permanent defects and loss of function anyway. She was right handed and was a passenger. It was her dominant hand.

        I have seen lots of folks in cars doing this since then. Also many doing the same thing on the top bars on a Jeep.

        Hands fully INSIDE the car at all times, not holding onto the frame.
        Now available in Kindle as well as print: C-Sharp Minor: My Mother's Seventeen-Year Journey through Dementia. 10% of my proceeds will be donated to the Alzheimer's Association.

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        • #44
          Whoever posted they wear Danskos to the barn, my barefoot horse stepped on my suede wooden clogs. Had eight stitches because he only stood on my big toe.

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          • #45
            Originally posted by dressagetraks View Post
            Yikes!

            No pictures, but another safety traveling tip. I typed the ER report, the op note, and the discharge summary on this patient years ago, and have never forgotten it. When riding in a car with windows open, NEVER hang onto the top of the open window frame with your hand. In a rollover accident, you will reflexively tighten down instead of pulling your hand safely back in, and the full weight of the vehicle will roll over your fingers and not only shatter your hand to smithereens but drive it into the ground to contaminate the whole wound.

            Her hand was a beanbag with multiple contaminated open fractures; doc commented that several small pieces of bone were actually missing, no doubt still back in the ground where the car rolled on her. That patient had extensive hand reconstruction surgery, probably permanent defects and loss of function anyway. She was right handed and was a passenger. It was her dominant hand.

            I have seen lots of folks in cars doing this since then. Also many doing the same thing on the top bars on a Jeep.

            Hands fully INSIDE the car at all times, not holding onto the frame.

            One of my best friends watched one of her friends lose her entire arm in a rollover. She was following in another vehicle, friend had arm hanging out of the window, car swerved and rolled, severing her arm. All my limbs are always inside the vehicle!
            "You can't really debate with someone who has a prescient invisible friend"
            carolprudm

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            • #46
              Originally posted by Chall View Post
              Whoever posted they wear Danskos to the barn, my barefoot horse stepped on my suede wooden clogs. Had eight stitches because he only stood on my big toe.
              That was me! Mine are plain leather and are basically a short boot. But the point is well-taken, no footwear is perfect and accidents happen around horses whatever you wear. I don't think there is any way my Danskos are less protective of my toes than any other paddock boot type.

              And that is as good as anyone is going to get me to do -- on the other end of the spectrum I refuse to wear steel toes after an acquaintance severed a couple toes when a horse ground on the steel at the wrong angle and bent it down. That skeeved me out even more than a couple breaks which I consider the cost of doing business around horses.

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              • #47
                My only foot injuries were both in paddock boots. I will say I have been bad about wearing chacos or flip flops at the barn...ESP bathing after I show and I'm really sweaty.

                Accident #1: my large pony spooked as I was turning him around on the concrete washrack. He jumped on the ride side of my right foot and spun around on it. Complained to mom (I was 11 or so) she told me not to take off my boot unless I didn't want to show in short stirrup. So I just limped around all day until after the show (I got champion!). When I took my boot off she burst into tears because she didn't know that it was that bad. I still have nerve damage in that area 10 years later.

                Accident #2:
                I was holding my horse waiting to walk him on the washrack. Person took their 1400lb WB off and the mate walked right over the left part of my left foot. Pretty sure I crushed my pinky toe and foot in that area. I have never felt such searing pain. I couldn't walk so I made the person tack my horse up for my lesson and attempted to take my lesson...didn't work so well because I couldn't put weight in the stirrup and when I dropped my stirrup and just pulled my toe up, it was excruciating! It took several weeks to get better.

                That being said...I still wear flip flops around my older QH all the time in the summer...I really should stop. You would think I would have learned my lesson. I did stop handling my ottb without flip flops after a close encounter taking him for a walk at a show.

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                • #48
                  Eeek...

                  I keep a pair of ancent airiat zips for summer barn work. They're in rough shape, and have blu-cote stains on them but they've rescued my feet half a dozen times!
                  www.felixfjord.blogspot.com

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                  • #49
                    OMG MB, that story is just wrong. I'm glad your niece kept her foot!
                    Missouri Fox Trotters-To ride one is to own one

                    Standardbreds, so much more then a harness racing horse.

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                    • #50
                      I groomed and trained harness horses at standardbred tracks and training farms for over ten years. In the summer months i wore those Dr Scholls wooden open toed and heeled clogs. When i got hot, i would just run hose water down my legs and continue on working. Cleaning stalls, riding the jog cart, hot walking, even taking them to the paddock to race etc. All day long working with at least two and sometimes more horses.
                      I know now that i was surrounded by guardian angels.

                      I did get a broken toe once when i had boots on. Had a horse in a cement wash rack and i was kneeling down, working on a leg when he shifted and stepped on my toe and stood there til i could convince him to move off. Kinda hard to ask a horse to move over when you are kneeling and have no leverage. Hurt like the devil. Another time in the winter with boots on, a horse i was leading sashayed just a bit as i was stepping on a frozen tire rut and broke the same toe. Now that toe grows an abnormal nail. Not pretty.

                      I still go down to the barn in flip-flops but not if im going to work with the horses.
                      from sunridge1 Go get 'em Roy! Stupid clown shoe nailing, acid pouring bast@rds.

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                      • #51
                        Ugh, no kidding about that Cashela! Horrid thing to happen. And such an astounding amount of damage for something I'm sure we've all done often enough: dismount before a full mount and landing on your your feet. Usually still holding the reins and then giving horsie hell for trying to leave when being mounted.

                        I've done that a number of times, even from bolters. I've rolled my ankle a time or two also. The combo and the speed just really did a lot more damage than I thought would be possible.

                        The healing and the physical therapy was pretty rough too...the pain...yeesh! I took her to all o her PT appointments, she was hurting.

                        So I can kind of imagine what JackieBlue went through with that leg of hers. Not really imagine since it wasn't me who went through that...but dang, that's one gnarly looking xray Jackie has. Owww!
                        You jump in the saddle,
                        Hold onto the bridle!
                        Jump in the line!
                        ...Belefonte

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                        • #52
                          Yup, no sneakers riding for me again, ever. I was working cows in sneakers (we often did that back then, stupid kids), and the horse fell on me. I couldn't get my foot out of the stirrup and my foot was stuck under the horse, with the foot bent in half the way no foot is ever supposed to bend. The horse then proceeded to roll up my leg getting up, and I was sure he was going to crush my spine, so I clawed my way out from under him. I knew it was bad when I was too afraid to take off my shoe to look at it. AND I was miles away from the nearest truck/anything, and there were no cell phones in that day.

                          So with a crushed foot, I had to get back on the same horse that had fallen on me and RIDE for 2 hours back to the truck. Thankfully it was numb by that time. Then we bumped over rutted roads for another hour to get to the hospital. I was told I'd never walk normally again, but I did 6 months in a cast and had a great (and horribly brutal - I STILL hate him!) physical therapist, and manage just fine now. I have a huge ridge/lump on my foot, but it's been 15 years and except for some pretty bad arthritis, I'm really doing well for someone with such a dire prognosis. I don't even really limp unless I'm tired. Now, would boots have saved me? Well, they probably would have reduced the damage, for sure. Not sure I could have gotten my foot out in any case - it happened pretty fast (we're still not sure exactly WHAT happened, and I don't remember) but the harder sole probably would have protected my foot a lot better from the bending.

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