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no flip flops in the barn

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  • no flip flops in the barn

    just want to add, this is not my photo. it was floating around FB and i stole it. Summer's coming, please be smart.


  • #2
    YIKES!

    Had that person been wearing shoes it would have just been a puffy balloon for a few days.

    Grateful to my old instructor for her strict dress code for the barn - even if we got ridiculously hot from being covered up and looked like ghosts at the beach!

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    • #3
      Living in Florida we get people coming out to the barn with flip flops all the time. I always cringe. I have heard some people argue that working around horses in flip flops makes them more careful. Okay whatever..... In addition to horses we have fire weed, poisonous snakes, thorny plants and prickly sand spurs. I like my feet too much.

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      • #4
        When I was about 10 years old, a mom of one of my fellow group lessoners had a horse she was holding leap forward onto her sandal clad foot. I have never forgotten what it looked like (worse than that), the ambulance showing up, how much pain she was in, and how dead broke the horse that did it was.

        I don't believe I've ever worn an unclosed shoe to the barn due to that. I've had a bad foot accident with getting my foot stepped on in tennis shoes as well as a kid, so it's always boots for me in the barn. Even when stopping in for a quick walk through for just tossing feed. I've lived in, over, or on the same property as my barns for close to 20 years, and I still don't just stop down in anything less than paddocks.

        Stuff you see as a kid never leaves you, and having my own foot cobbled back together after getting stepped on and pushed over in a tennis shoe sticks with me as well. Had plenty of broken toes in paddocks since then as years around horses will dish you, but man. I saw this pic a couple weeks ago and the flash backs were harsh and a good reminder for me as to why I'm so diligent.
        "Aye God, Woodrow..."

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        • #5
          A couple of years ago, one of our more PITA teens brought a friend with her to the barn--yep, you guessed it, flip flops, horse stepped on friend's foot, broken toes, hospital visit, lawsuit against horse owners parents. (Don't think it went anywhere.)

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          • #6
            I practically live in my flip-flops and I wear them to drive to the barn, then change into my barn shoes, which are in the trunk of my car and I change at the car, when I arrive.

            I will not claim to have never walked into the barn in flip-flops. At a barn when the tack room was 20m from where I parked, I'd walk in and put my boots on right away (versus changing into muck boots for the 20m walk). If I forget something, I'll run back in real quick.

            BUT, I have NEVER and would NEVER handle or get anywhere close to a horse with flip-flops or do anything working with the horse, even throwing feed or the like. I get nervous even wearing sneakers around the barn. I prefer a more solid boot or boot-type shoe.

            If I had a barn or set the rules, open-toe shoes of any kind would be prohibited.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Zevida View Post
              I get nervous even wearing sneakers around the barn. I prefer a more solid boot or boot-type shoe.
              Don't your toes just kind of curl up and it takes you a few seconds to figure out why?

              That's what happens to me anyway.
              "Aye God, Woodrow..."

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              • #8
                I saw that pic on FB too. Not surprised the damage is that great from a hoof on a bare foot. I've been stepped on many times as a trimmer. I work in heavy leather boots for a reason and I've bled under my boots from a bad stomp a time or two....and I'm pretty tuned in and careful. It's usually those freaky things that you don't see coming that do the most damage.

                Years ago I was untacking a TB I was eventing and someone came racing around a corner behind him. He leaped up in the air in fright and landed on my ankle which thankfully was covered partly by my shoe cuff. He was shod as I recall and literally stood on my ankle for a moment...it bent in ways it wasn't intended to. OMG..the pain was unreal. I finished my chores, went home, took one look at my leg, and ended up at the hospital. I had pitting edema and terrible bruises. They never did find a fracture after taking many xrays as they couldn't believe it wasn't from how it looked. I ended up in a soft cast for weeks after that. Totally freak accident and that ankle still hurts me 20 years later. Just badly strained I guess.

                I've had several people hold horses for me to trim in sandals, flip flops or even bare feet once. I did say something to the young lady with the bare feet that her feet would not fare well if she got stomped. She just laughed off my warning and continued barefooted. She was lucky and nothing happened. I hope she saw that on FB. I know she's on there.

                Anyway, I do nothing these days around horses without some sort of leather footwear over my whole foot. The lightest built shoes I own are my Ariats. Otherwise I usually wear my hiking boots which are very sturdy.

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                • #9
                  A bit off topic but flip flops, sandals, open-toe shoes and the like should never be worn in a laboratory either, esp. a chemical lab. Just think what a spill with HCl would do....
                  Sue

                  I'm not saying let's go kill all the stupid people...I'm just saying let's remove all the warning labels and let the problem sort itself out.

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                  • #10
                    That photo says more than all the lectures in the world..Anyone who wants to wear sandals or flip flops in the barn should be shown that.

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                    • #11
                      OMG that picture is horrible! Yes, I too am guilty of occasionally (really, not often) wearing flip flops around horses...but wow! I will think twice now before handling a horse in them. Yikes! The idea of the skin getting ripped off never occurred to me...

                      OP- thanks for sharing the picture!
                      Unrepentant carb eater

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                      • #12
                        Saw that one on FB...like others I've seen that happen in person when I was younger. And it makes an impression...I've never worn anything but barn shoes or boots anywhere near horses. I keep a few pairs lined up...all step in types...so no reason not to take 2 seconds to change.

                        Here's another reason not to wear open footwear:
                        http://www.menscosmo.com/wp-content/...-in-humans.jpg

                        Yeah...hookworms aren't fun either.
                        You jump in the saddle,
                        Hold onto the bridle!
                        Jump in the line!
                        ...Belefonte

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                        • #13
                          Ah crap, that was gross. But I'm thankful for the reminder. Today, I decided to save time and just do a quick check on the horses/feed the barn cats after work. Drove straight there from work (even though I pass my house on the way there) and was wearing flats. Horses were close, so i decided to check for ticks and give some scratches.

                          I won't be lazy anymore! Changing into boots is a must. Thank you for the reminder.
                          Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
                          White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

                          Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.

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                          • #14
                            *goes to show picture to daughter* who doesn't wear flip flops around horses, but since they live at home, and it's very easy to just walk into the field/paddock without thinking sometimes, don't want her to get any ideas.

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                            • #15
                              Along the same lines, it is painfully obvious to me (NOW) but don't wear toe rings, not even under paddock boots.... Ten years ago I was (young, stupid) wearing a toe ring on my left foot. Horse I was riding that day stepped his huge, Irish hoof onto my foot. I internally cursed a few times, but mounted up and rode in a lesson and a cross country schooling. Came back to the house, took my boots off, and the front half of the sock was dried blood.
                              See, it wasn't just a regular ring, but the Irish claddagh ring, which is two hands holding a heart with a crown on top of it. The crown punctured my toe, right below the nail. I'm still shocked I didn't lose the nail, it was wiggly (gag) for years after that. I'm still funky about it during pedicures, it hurts.

                              And that was just a tiny little ring, UNDER boots!! Cannot imagine that linked picture there....

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                              • #16
                                Keep a pair of suitable, slip on shoes at the barn, so no matter what you are doing/wearing, you can change easily and be safe.
                                Laurie

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                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by lauriep View Post
                                  Keep a pair of suitable, slip on shoes at the barn, so no matter what you are doing/wearing, you can change easily and be safe.
                                  I keep an old, old pair of Danskos and socks in my tack room. I often feed in flip flops but that does not require me to go over the fence/in with the horses. Should I see an oddity and need to go in, the Danskos are right there. If you make it convenient, you are more likely to avoid "just this once...." accidents.

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                                  • #18
                                    That pic is actually one of a series of three that appeared on a blacksmithing forum, I think....the first two showed the before and during pics for the repair.
                                    I use them when I teach health and safety to my students (school, not riding) to show how important protective gear is.
                                    If I can find the link, I'll post it.
                                    Dee
                                    Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
                                    Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
                                    http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/

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                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      Originally posted by DeeThbd View Post
                                      That pic is actually one of a series of three that appeared on a blacksmithing forum, I think....the first two showed the before and during pics for the repair.
                                      I use them when I teach health and safety to my students (school, not riding) to show how important protective gear is.
                                      If I can find the link, I'll post it.
                                      Dee
                                      thanks

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I wore Tevas for a month or so while I was grooming (I developed some serious trench foot in Ocala and was trying to get my feet to dry out). I was super careful...until I was leading one horse past another who threatened to kick. I yanked mine forward out of the way and of course he landed on me. I'm still glad I got hurt and not him, BUT of course, if I'd been wearing sensible boots we'd have both been fine

                                        Hard way to learn a simple lesson but then I'm pretty rock headed And I still don't know how other people keep their feet dry when they wash a dozen horses a day
                                        Holy crap, how does Darwin keep missing you? ~Lauruffian

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