• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Panic Snaps -opinions please

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Panic Snaps -opinions please

    Maybe not right forum, but I need opinoins & information. ASAP. I know this forum is full of opinions. And hopefully first hand experience.


    I am used to these panic snaps: http://www.pronto.com/user/search.do?displayQuery=panic%20snap&SEM=true&query =panic%20snap&adid=y-20070712-9390-11413-p_mes&ref=panic%20snaps&creativeid={creative}&site ={placement}&loadingComplete=true&owl=true

    But Tractor Supply only carries these: http://www.tractorsupply.com/nationa...nickel-3511343

    Has anyone ever seen or used the TSC one? What makes it so special to run 2 to 3 to 4 times the cost of the good old fashioned panic snaps? Is it actually made better or stronger?

    I am outright flabbergasted at the price, as I just handed someone ten bucks to pick me up one when they are at TSC tomorrow. I need a panic snap ASAP, but really the TSC one seems terribly expensive. And I just do not like the looks of it online, of how it is engineered/fashioned/made/designed. Yes, sometimes someone really does design a better mouse trap, but is this one of those times or not?

    Please, your experiences with the TSC one...

    TIA
    "Police officers are public servants. Not James Bond with a license to kill."

  • #2
    Wow that's a $2.99 snap in the catalogs. TC comes up at $8.49 for my zip code pricing.

    as for the snap, it's the snap that I am most familiar with - does the job - and if you need it quick that's the price you pay for convenience these days.

    I like to braid these onto a plain cotton rope that I buy to use to tie to the side of the trailer. I've seen horses tied with a loose rope that they can get a leg up over and a panicked horse that pulls back on a trailer. I like to be able to reach and release them asap.

    Comment


    • #3
      I hadn't seen them at TSC, but I use a similar model made of brass for our quick release needs. The brass ones run about $8 at the local tack store. You have to twist the barrel to open the snap. Just pulling on the barrel won't open it, nor will any kind of head shaking.

      http://www.trailheadsupply.com/Brass...HTWISTSNAP.htm

      I like the model because it will release no matter what the pull on the snap, but it ONLY RELEASES when I turn the collar to open it. Doesn't open by accident if you have closed it correctly, easy to open one-handed.

      I find it much superior to the quick release snaps that have the sliding collar and let go when the horse shakes it's head on the crossties. Their springs seem to get soft, wear out, in short time of use.

      Looking at my brass quick release snaps, they do take more than a little work to make. There is a bearing and spring inside the barrel part, to hold it locked. My brass models have take a LOT of abuse, last for years. I replace them when they are worn down to halfway on the flip part or the eye where the rope goes.

      I have seen some pretty cheap copies in chromed steel, don't know if I would trust them to hold a horse well. So check your quality of maker before laying your money down. The brass ones feel solid, not sloppy fitted pieces, have some weight in your hand. They have always been the most expensive snap sold at the tack store, but I feel they are worth the value because my horses WILL be where I left them when I return. I use these snaps on my neckropes, which we use to tie the horses while away from home.

      They last a very long time here. They have only broken if you pull the collar down while the snap is open. That will let the spring escape and bearing fall out that are under the collar. I keep all these snaps in the closed position when not in use, to prevent collar getting pulled down.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        If yours does not look like either in the TWO links then what does yours look like? *curious to know*

        I had only ever seen the ones in the first link, until coming across this Tractor Supply one online today.
        "Police officers are public servants. Not James Bond with a license to kill."

        Comment


        • #5
          Link added above.

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            Oh, thanks for giving a link!

            I have never seen one like that. Not what I want though. I want to be able to grab & pull, as we are are talking possible panic scenarios. Having to hang on long enough to twist in whatever proper direction is too scarey for old me. I am not as nimble & quick as I used to be.

            I cannot believe I cannot find the old guard standard in panic snaps. Nary a panic snap one around here actually. And Tractor Supply is over 30 miles away, to pay a hideous price for one I do not even want.

            TSC mgr & I even had a chat over the phone about their model, & she was very much what the fruitbat about it too.
            "Police officers are public servants. Not James Bond with a license to kill."

            Comment


            • #7
              Panic snaps are a good thing. But no matter the make, you need them on the 'other' end of the tie from the horse, whether that is wall on cross ties or wall in trailer. If you have a panic situation, you want quick release from the stationary end, not the 1000 lb + mobile and can kill you end.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Beverley View Post
                Panic snaps are a good thing. But no matter the make, you need them on the 'other' end of the tie from the horse, whether that is wall on cross ties or wall in trailer. If you have a panic situation, you want quick release from the stationary end, not the 1000 lb + mobile and can kill you end.
                hmm I knew a girl who had the end of the lead rope knotted into the halter, then sunk the snap through the tie ring and hooked it back onto the halter...her idea was that way you had the rope on the horse...(I thought you had a dangerous projectile on the rope, but hey)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Beverley View Post
                  Panic snaps are a good thing. But no matter the make, you need them on the 'other' end of the tie from the horse, whether that is wall on cross ties or wall in trailer. If you have a panic situation, you want quick release from the stationary end, not the 1000 lb + mobile and can kill you end.
                  This comes up once in awhile as an argument here on COTH and it seems just as many argue for the panic snap to be at the halter as at the opposite end. I actually prefer the panic be at the halter as I have never had a problem reaching that, but sometimes am too short to reach the other end (some barns, like where I board, have the rings mounted above the stall fronts...I have to use a step stool to reach them). I also don't want to send the snap flying at the horse when released.

                  As for the TSC snaps, we have some that look like that (kind of different shape than the "normal" snap, sort of long and skinny) and they aren't anything special. Not sure where they came from, and probably not TSC here, but they don't hold very well and seem to pop open too easily.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I use a loop of baling twine.

                    It's cheap and breaks when you need it to.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by LookmaNohands View Post
                      I use a loop of baling twine.

                      It's cheap and breaks when you need it to.
                      Me too! I hate metal projectiles! But make sure it's not the nylon bailing twine. That stuff is hard to break compared to the "real" stuff.
                      Flip a coin. It's not what side lands that matters, but what side you were hoping for when the coin was still in the air.

                      You call it boxed wine. I call it carboardeaux.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Our barn has these and they work REALLY well. They're strong enough that they won't let go with a little pulling but they do in a panic situation. I just bought some for my trailer too.
                        "Be the change you want to see in the world."
                        ~Mahatma Gandhi

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LookmaNohands View Post
                          I use a loop of baling twine.

                          It's cheap and breaks when you need it to.
                          I was at a barn last year that used the plastic chain you get at the hardware store.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by LookmaNohands View Post
                            I use a loop of baling twine.

                            It's cheap and breaks when you need it to.
                            Most economical way. Especially if you have some that are regular pullers. My last barn I boarded at had the twine at the top of the cross-ties so if the horse pulled it down, they still had something attached to the halter.
                            I don't always feel up to arguing with your ignorance

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Don't depend on twine or wire to give, sometimes it doesn't.

                              We had one horse too many for our places to tie, so I tied this extra horse to a feed trailer with twine on the end.
                              Sure enough, horse kept pulling and stretched the leadrope, stuck it's head under the trailer looking for one more wisp of hay and then was caught on the corner, head low and starting to panic.
                              Every time he tried to get his head up, the whole trailer moved.
                              The twine held just fine, didn't break like it was supposed to, there really was not enough pull on it, I think.
                              Thankfully the horse was quiet and responded to "wait a minute" and quit pulling until I could get to the twine and release it.

                              I was taught to be over the top safety conscious and that was about the most stupid way I ever tied a horse and almost caused a bad wreck.

                              I know twine or any other can be too strong at times, don't depend too much on them.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by besttwtbever View Post
                                Our barn has these and they work REALLY well. They're strong enough that they won't let go with a little pulling but they do in a panic situation. I just bought some for my trailer too.
                                I think these are the best option out there! You can also adjust the rubber tensioner so they will let go easier or with more pulling depending on your horse. My cousin has these because she has a mare that habitually pulls back, and they do not act as large projectiles when they let loose! I am getting some for my cross ties in my new barn.
                                "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Those of you who advocate or don't mind the panic snap on the halter have never been in a situation with a 17.2 hh rearing and panicking! There's NO WAY you're going to reach that snap if its on the halter! Not only that -- no one in his or her right mind is going to get under the hooves of a rearing horse to do so!

                                  The panic snap belongs ON THE WALL - not on the horse!

                                  Pet Peeve of mine.

                                  and better yet -- why not teach the horse to yield to pressure BEFORE relying on a 'Panic Snap'? Even better -- teach the horse to ground tie.
                                  --Gwen <><
                                  "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
                                  http://www.thepenzancehorse.com

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by caballus View Post
                                    Those of you who advocate or don't mind the panic snap on the halter have never been in a situation with a 17.2 hh rearing and panicking! There's NO WAY you're going to reach that snap if its on the halter! Not only that -- no one in his or her right mind is going to get under the hooves of a rearing horse to do so!

                                    The panic snap belongs ON THE WALL - not on the horse!

                                    Pet Peeve of mine.

                                    and better yet -- why not teach the horse to yield to pressure BEFORE relying on a 'Panic Snap'? Even better -- teach the horse to ground tie.
                                    Ground tying is not a sensible solution for many horses, like those starting training and barely acceptable for well trained horses.
                                    Also not a sensible solution in open spaces, ask any cowboy.
                                    You can hobble and be a bit more sure your horse will still be there when you need it, although barely better than ground tying, some horses learn to run well with hobbles on.

                                    I do agree, the release on any horse that is tied should be, be it a snap or twine or quick release knot first on the other end of the horse.
                                    We can hedge bets and have a release on both ends, one on the horse end, the other on what we tie to.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Panic snaps are problematical for a bunch of reasons, not the least of which is that most folks don't routinely clean and lubricate them. Dry metal and dry metal, under stress, doesn't always release easily, no matter where it is. Rusted metal on rusted metal is even worse.

                                      Tying with a hay string is just a really bad idea. Horses can very quickly learn that a light "pull back" produces freedom. That trains the horse to be a "set backer" and that's a real bear to deal with later on. (Ask me know I know. ).

                                      I use "panic snaps" in some applications. I don't put them near the horse, but rather someplace I can get to if I've got a "panic'd horse."

                                      I also carry the Ultimate Lead Rope Release Device: A very sharp knife. Most male riders I know carry one, too. I can count on one hand the number of female riders in 25 years that carried a knife on a regular basis. Maybe one of our resident "shrinks" might want to make something of that. Maybe it's an artifact of the different ways men and women dress. But more women should carry knives when working with horses. And know how to use them effectively for problems like cutting loose a panicing horse.

                                      G.
                                      Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        For the life of me, I can't figure out why no industrious CoTHer has invented a tie with the panic snap in the middle instead of on the wall or on the halter. But then we'd have to argue over which direction the heavy portion went.

                                        Personally, I use blocker rings.
                                        Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X