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Strange Horse Advice from Total Strangers

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  • Strange Horse Advice from Total Strangers

    Have you ever been approached and given totally unsolicited "horse advice" by someone you've never really met before, who knows nothing about you or your horses, and whose advice is based on something that's pretty "out there?"

    My boyfriend's brother and SIL were camping with their horses not long ago, and ended up riding with another couple. The woman claimed to be some sort of accomplished trainer, and after the ride she told them that they should get rid of their horses because their "hair whorls" indicated that they weren't any good.

    Just like that.

    Of course, the brother and SIL are sensible enough not to take this kind of thing seriously. . .we actually found it a little amusing (and bizarre) that a total stranger would tell them to get rid of their horse based on its hair whorls.

    What's the strangest "advice" you've been given about your horses, from a total stranger?
    Please copy and paste this to your signature if you know someone, or have been affected by someone who needs a smack upside the head. Lets raise awareness.

  • #2
    The most annoying was when I was taking my friend's daughter on her first beach ride. Daughter is a beginner rider, and fairly nervous, so she was on my old Arab, who is a wonderful babysitter.

    We're having a lovely ride, and out of the blue this (probably drunk) man starts yelling that he's going to teach us how to get our horses to trot. He starts yelling "TROT" at the top of his lungs, and waving his arms and jacket at the horses.

    He wouldn't listen at all when we asked him to stop. Thank goodness my old guy knew enough to look at me first, and completely ignored this lunatic. We got out of there as fast as we could (at a walk, thank you very much!).

    Comment


    • #3
      I took my four year old on a hack up to the corner to learn how to handle cows - we spent an hour just lunging beside the cows while they came and went. My horse did lots of snorts and was pretty up - but I was fine.

      Older neighbour comes running (as much as an 80 yr old can run) down the street with a whip aAnd chain lead shank in hand (he used to have a commercial team and often visits our horses so not a stranger). He says I am teaching him bad habits. Then proceeds to tell me that I need to get on him. Ah - no - a 17.2hh 4 yr old that is having a melt down - no I think not on a busy road. He tells me he is going to help me mount - ah - no.

      At the end of an hour I take my horse to the gate and make him stand there while all the cows come running over - because we are in a new spot. He stands there - shaking - but does what I ask. And low and behold I did not have to whip or shank him.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bravestrom View Post
        I took my four year old on a hack up to the corner to learn how to handle cows - we spent an hour just lunging beside the cows while they came and went. My horse did lots of snorts and was pretty up - but I was fine.

        Older neighbour comes running (as much as an 80 yr old can run) down the street with a whip aAnd chain lead shank in hand (he used to have a commercial team and often visits our horses so not a stranger). He says I am teaching him bad habits. Then proceeds to tell me that I need to get on him. Ah - no - a 17.2hh 4 yr old that is having a melt down - no I think not on a busy road. He tells me he is going to help me mount - ah - no.

        At the end of an hour I take my horse to the gate and make him stand there while all the cows come running over - because we are in a new spot. He stands there - shaking - but does what I ask. And low and behold I did not have to whip or shank him.
        I don't know. I think it's better to ride them through those scary moments than longe them on the side of a busy road but that's just me. I'd be too afraid that he would get away from me on the longe line and then my neighbor would see a crazy woman chasing her horse down the street! Admittedly my days of those kids of rides are past me but now I pay someone with an experienced sticky butt to provide those kinds of experiences.

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        • #5
          DO NOT ATTEMPT TO ADVISE BRAVESTROM. Just sayin'.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Alter Tag View Post
            DO NOT ATTEMPT TO ADVISE BRAVESTROM. Just sayin'.
            hah - we were in the field beside the cows - ah - you know me too well -

            Comment


            • #7
              Riding my horse on a trail that runs through the edge of town. Tied my horse up outside a little tourist-trap shop to go inside and get a bottle of water (store had a hitching rail). Come out and see a small child sitting on my 5yo, still-a-little-green, NEVER been around children, somewhat squirrelly gelding. Dad is trying to get a pic of junior on my horse but my fella is doing too much dancing, kid is flopping like a rag-doll up there.

              Me: What the hell are you doing, get that kid off my horse

              Dad: I need a picture first

              Me: Get your damn kid off my horse!

              Dad looks dumbfounded. I yank kid off horse and set him on the ground away from dancing hooves.

              Me: What the hell is wrong with you? I oughta call the police!

              Dad: Well I just wanted a picture

              Me: Go to petting zoo for that crap. Besides, my horse isn't safe for children.

              Dad: Well when he acts like that you should twist his ear and bite it.

              Me: *hurls torrent of curses inappropriate for small children at father*

              Mom appears out of nowhere horrified, hauls off dad and child.


              I now make sure I pack bottled water every ride, and avoid the trail that runs through the edge of town.

              Comment


              • #8
                Once I was sitting at a cafe while sporting some rather obvious bruises from falling off a horse, and some guy came over and started asking me about them. It was a little weird to begin with because he was hitting on me and he thought they were bruises from a boyfriend, but whatever. I told him no, I'm a trainer and I fell off a young horse I was riding and landed on my face.

                He tells me that the way to fix that is to beat the hell out of the horse so "he knows who's boss." He elaborated on how to do it too, including "kick him in the belly" and "beat him until he's too scared to even look at you." Yeah dude, I think I see why you were hitting on the woman with bruises...

                I told him I prefer not to waste my time on violent idiots.
                exploring the relationship between horse and human

                Comment


                • #9
                  I was riding my TB one day who had the most lovely daisy-clipping trot. A lady from a work crew on the farm came over to watch. When I came close to her she told me, "If you put some chains on her feet she'll pick 'em up higher."

                  I just said thanks, but this horse was retired from showing...
                  "In the beginning, the universe was created. This made a lot of people angry and has widely been considered as a bad move." -Douglas Adams

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Not from a stranger, but a useless (crazy) guy I boarded with:

                    Was loading my 2 yr old for the *3rd time ever* to get him the hell off this crazy guy's property, had discussed with the shipper that we were going to take our time and not give him any treats until he was on the bus, and this nut comes RUNNING up the driveway with a aluminum shovel and bucket of grain, proceeds to drop the shovel on the pavement behind my horse, making a hell of a racket, and then shoves the grain bucket into my horse's face. After a bit of swearing on my part, he tells me that my horse is dangerous, and that he HAS to get him on the trailer right away, and that he was going to teach me how to do it. Insert more swearing.

                    He finally left us alone and we got on fine. So glad I got out of there!
                    What I lack in preparedness I make up for in enthusiasm

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Anteup, that reminds me of when I was trying to load one of my horses once. It was at a state park and we had stupidly trailered him over in a trailer that was just a little too small for him--not a big deal for most horses, he could fit okay and it was a short trip, but he's super claustrophobic and I should have known better.

                      Anyway, we were trying to load him and this guy comes over to help. First he's trying to whip him in, which I stopped immediately because the thing about this horse is that if you try to force him in like that, he'll fight like crazy (he was a stallion owned by idiots for the first 14 or so years of his life, and has a lot of issues with isolation and abuse as a result, stuff I've personally witnessed). Dude didn't even ask first. Then he tries to use a butt rope to force him in and the horse starts rearing and falling rather than go in, so the guy goes into this huge lecture about how my horse is so dangerous and I need to put him down right away because dangerous horses like that shouldn't be allowed to live and he'd kill me eventually.

                      Yeah. Owned the horse for 4 years before that and competed successfully through 4th level, did a lot of cow work, some beginner garrocha, and even jousting and medieval reenactment. Trailered him all over the country (in a trailer that fit him). Have owned him for another 7 years since and have guided trail rides and even taught some beginner lessons on him. I've fallen off the horse once in 11 years. I'm not saying he can't be dangerous, because he sure can if you don't handle him right. It didn't do me much good to have a total stranger telling me he could shoot my horse right there for me if I wanted, though. Especially because we never asked him for his help in the first place.

                      I can't believe I forgot about that guy. You know, I don't get many people offering unsolicited advice or anything--seems like I get less than most COTHers actually. But when I do get them, they seem to be doozies.
                      exploring the relationship between horse and human

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Several decades ago, when I and the world were both young, I'd gotten a shiner while working with a baby horse. I lived in NY City at the time, and as my eye was turning all sorts of fabulous colors, I decided to become a hermit for as long as could, except for trips to the barn.

                        I finally ran out of food, and I put on my sunglasses and skulked out to the food store. I was standing in the check out line when the woman in the line beside me leaned over and said gently, "You know, you don't have to stay with him, honey." I just thanked her, rather than trying to explain that the perpetrator was all of six months old.
                        www.TerriMiller.com
                        Photos & Commissioned Paintings

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My 'strangest advice' was when I was 17 years old and working at the track as a hot walker. I had one creepy guy come up to me and watch me cooling out my colt. He started walking alongside my colt, who up until then had been minding his manners and being a good boy. When the creep started walking alongside him, though, my colt started acting up.
                          Creep says, "You know, girls got no business being round stallions."
                          I didn't say anything, but I was very glad I had this big horse between him and me.
                          "You wanna know why?"
                          "Not particularly." I said. I know now why the colt was suddenly acting up-he was feeding off my fear.
                          The creep continued, "You know why this colt is acting up?"
                          I said, "Because he just finished a work?"
                          Creep: "No, it's because you're on the rag and studs will try and breed you."

                          Ick. I will never forget that creep. Ick.


                          I was pretty shocked, and when I got to my trainer's office I complained to him. This is back in the days when the police weren't called in for things like this. My boss merely told some of the grooms to keep an eye out for the creep and 'take care of him."
                          They must have done so, I never saw him again.
                          Ick. He still creeps me out, all these years later.
                          The best thing to do on a golf course is a GALLOP!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            That you MUST look down when posting to determine the correct diagnonal, you cannot feel it.

                            You'll poke your horses eye out with an aged riding whip.

                            Pouring pure essential oils on your horse's back did not cause all the open lesions on the horse's back, it was the toxins leaving the horses body.

                            Don't look at your horse, it will make them act up.

                            It's not colicking if the gums aren't purple.

                            This is all I can think of right now.
                            I LOVE my Chickens!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              When I was going through a very busy time in my life, a young girl (about 10) heard that I had a horse and started asking me questions about my horse. She asked how often I rode him, and I told her 3 times a week. She gave me a long lecture on how that wasn't nearly enough, and that it was harming the horse to ride if you didn't ride daily. It was kind of a long day.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I hauled two horses to the vet to get their Coggins pulled. I unloaded them and tied them to the side of the trailer to snooze while we waited. A woman approached me and asked me if I fenced them in at home, or did they stay close to home by choice. I replied that of course they are fenced in, I'd rather they not get hit on the road, and fences make sure they don't go tear up someone's yard (Who has to explain such things????)

                                She looked sad, eyes downcast, then proceeded to tell me with sorrow in her voice that if they loved me they'd stay close to me, you know, like the Native American's horses did, they didn't need fences.

                                With that, she tugged on her dog's leash, and turned away.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by tm View Post
                                  Several decades ago, when I and the world were both young, I'd gotten a shiner while working with a baby horse. I lived in NY City at the time, and as my eye was turning all sorts of fabulous colors, I decided to become a hermit for as long as could, except for trips to the barn.

                                  I finally ran out of food, and I put on my sunglasses and skulked out to the food store. I was standing in the check out line when the woman in the line beside me leaned over and said gently, "You know, you don't have to stay with him, honey." I just thanked her, rather than trying to explain that the perpetrator was all of six months old.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    if they loved me they'd stay close to me, you know, like the Native American's horses did, they didn't need fences
                                    A "gawani pony boy" fan maybe? "Horse, follow closely".....some people are just ignorant, but pretend to be know it alls......argh!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Oh! That reminds me of one. The friend we had who brought his wife to our farm. We had a seven month old colt at that time, bred in Va, but born here in our pasture. This woman proceeded to lecture us about how we should have already gotten this horse ridden, and we better get on him before he got any bigger........duh huh! He's a baby with about 2 more years before we even think about riding him, you dork!!!

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        It was her LEASHED dog that made the mental picture complete for me. That, and her nappy ass moccasins.

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