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Do you wash saddle pads in your personal washing machine?

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  • #41
    I always take a stiff brush to my saddle pads after I'm finished riding before I let them air-dry, so they're never that hairy when I wash them. And yes, I do throw them in the washing machine at home. I don't wash blankets because my local tack store offers laundry service and it's pretty cheap for $50/four turnouts including waterproofing them.

    If there's ever hair left in the washer, I'll run a cycle without anything it it.
    "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison

    So, the Zen Buddhist says to the hotdog vendor, "Make me one with everything."

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    • #42
      I vacuum my saddle pads before running them through the washer. Find it makes a world of difference in the winter and spring. Rest of year - not so many hair issues.

      I do heavy blankets at the laundry mat - even though I have a HD super capacity washer, it's for residential use. I use the HD super capacity commercial washer at the mat - works like a charm. Bring a good book and some chocolate, and it's a relaxing hour away from house/farm/barn work.
      Originally posted by SmartAlex

      Give it up. Many of us CoTHers are trapped at a computer all day with no way out, and we hunt in packs. So far it as all been in good fun. You should be thankful for that.

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      • #43
        I know that this is somewhat OT, but has anybody washed Back on Track saddle pads in the machine? I have a front loader with a zillion different cycles, and am wondering if it's safe to do. The underside of it has gotten pretty grungy!
        Dee
        Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
        Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
        http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/

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        • #44
          Yes, but only when my husband isn't looking.

          I do pre-rinse the yuckier stuff outside. Some stuff does need to go to the Laundromat. But there again there is sneaking involved.
          ::Sometimes you have to burn a few bridges to keep the crazies from following you::

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          • #45
            While I do wash them at home if need be, I prefer to go to a laundromat, because I think they get cleaner in the old-skool lotsa water front loaders. In machines with the center agitator, I sometimes have to wash things a couple times for them to come clean.
            If we have to nail on talent, it's not talent.
            Founder, Higher Standards Leather Care Addicts Anonymous

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            • #46
              I do wash saddle pads, horse boots, and fly masks in the home washer.

              I wash pads after every use, so they are never too disgusting with hair. This does a lot to give you long life on pads because the abrasive dirt isn't allowed to build up for long.

              I do wipe the inside of the washer afterward. DH might not be as tolerant of all the little grey hairs everywhere as I am.

              I hang to dry out on our front walk's railing.

              I do dog beds & towels at home, too.

              For horse blankets, I call the blanket washing company. Very convenient, decent price, and won't wreck my top loader. The big western pads get pressure washed at the car wash, but I use a light blanket under those to keep them as clean as possible.
              ~ Horse Box Lovers Clique ~

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              • #47
                My DH got me a separate "pony" washer and dryer. Saddle pads, blankets, breeches all go in there, but I also sometimes was workout clothes etc. in that machine. If very hairy, I will do an empty load with low water to clean out
                OTTBs rule, but spots are good too!

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                • #48
                  related question

                  One of the previous posts mentioned taking then to the self-serve car wash and using the high powered spray of water to clean them.

                  This is an AWESOME idea and I am seriously tempted to try it.

                  One question, though, does anyone know if the water at those places is clean?

                  I mean, I know it looks clean (not that I'd drink it anytime soon), but my thoughts are, I'm sure for water conservation reasons, they probably re-use the water that goes down the drain when people wash their cars.

                  I'm sure this water is filtered to some extent, but is it filtered enough to be safe to wash saddle pads and/or blankets, clean enough that there wouldnt be any residual irritating soap in it? Or what about people that use metal cleaners and/or detergents to clean their tire rims?? That stuff goes down the drain too, and again, while i'm sure the water is filtered to some extent, is it filtered enough?

                  Anyone know abnout the inner workings of a self-serve car wash??? THANKS!
                  Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day, saying "I will try again tomorrow" -Mary Ann Radmacher

                  Wearing a helmet saved my eyesight

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                  • #49
                    Once when I was a kid I brought my saddle pad home and washed it before a show. My mom FLIPPED over all the hair left in the washer! Never did it again after that... and haven't had my own washer since leaving home. Non-show stuff I usually do by hand (hose + detergent + drying in the sun). Gets the job done... show pads go in the laundramat to stay nice and white, but I brush off as much of the hair as I can before I put it in.
                    If the pony spits venom in your face or produces a loud roar, it is probably not a pony. Find another. -The Oatmeal

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                    • #50
                      My washer has a "2nd rinse" button that I press, so when I wash my horse stuff, there is never any hair to wipe out.

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                      • #51
                        Originally posted by OhMissLibrarian View Post
                        One of the previous posts mentioned taking then to the self-serve car wash and using the high powered spray of water to clean them.

                        This is an AWESOME idea and I am seriously tempted to try it.

                        One question, though, does anyone know if the water at those places is clean?

                        I mean, I know it looks clean (not that I'd drink it anytime soon), but my thoughts are, I'm sure for water conservation reasons, they probably re-use the water that goes down the drain when people wash their cars.

                        I'm sure this water is filtered to some extent, but is it filtered enough to be safe to wash saddle pads and/or blankets, clean enough that there wouldnt be any residual irritating soap in it? Or what about people that use metal cleaners and/or detergents to clean their tire rims?? That stuff goes down the drain too, and again, while i'm sure the water is filtered to some extent, is it filtered enough?

                        Anyone know abnout the inner workings of a self-serve car wash??? THANKS!
                        I think most car washes use "gray water" for the soaping water, but rinse water is clean-hasn't-been-used-in-the-car-wash-before water. I don't think one would use "car wash soapy water" on their horse blankets, regardless.
                        Last edited by pattnic; Jun. 2, 2011, 02:56 PM. Reason: Couldn't decide how to spell "grey"
                        If we have to nail on talent, it's not talent.
                        Founder, Higher Standards Leather Care Addicts Anonymous

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                        • #52
                          Thanks Pattnic,
                          When I go, I'll make sure that I stick to the rinse water setting!! Still think it is a great idea!!
                          Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day, saying "I will try again tomorrow" -Mary Ann Radmacher

                          Wearing a helmet saved my eyesight

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                          • #53
                            I voted "other" but I see lots of folks do what I do, which is wash and then rinse twice or follow with a load of stanky work clothes.
                            Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
                            Incredible Invisible

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                            • #54
                              I wash the saddle pads, dog beds, blankets and throw rugs (usually covered in dog hair, a little pee and who knows what else) in my regular washing machine. Hubby does not mind. I vacuum out the tub after it dries. Then I hang everything on the back fence to dry...

                              I thought everyone did that?????
                              We do not have an overpopulation of dogs, we have an under population of responsible dog owners!!!

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                              • #55
                                Originally posted by fordtraktor View Post
                                Yes of course! What good is a washing machine if you don't use it to wash dirty stuff?

                                And horse dirt isn't really dirt, IMO. My husband disagrees but I just do the wash while he's at work. What he doesn't see doesn't hurt him. I don't lie about it but he doesn't ask, so all is happy.
                                Sounds like my house, but then from my point of view I think that a little bit of horse pooh and some hair is better than oil and diesel and other horrible smelling sticky stuff that DH and DS have all over their clothes after a day trying to fix the insides of a tractor.

                                Which reminds me, show this weekend, and the cat walked on my nice new pad, off to the barn and collect for washing
                                I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

                                Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique

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                                • #56
                                  I don't blanket, but I wash saddle pads, coolers, and pretty much everything else I can (including bridles) in our front-loading washing machine. I'll generally do a quick wipe-down to get the largest portion of hair and things out of the washer, and then I'll do a load of barn clothes or something before I wash my underwear and nicer clothing. If there's any hair left, the lint trap in the dryer actually seems to do a pretty good job of collecting it off of the clothing once it makes it to that point. Most of the time I just hang my saddle pads to dry.
                                  "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
                                  -Edward Hoagland

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                                  • #57
                                    I used to, but I just discovered that my barn has a washer I can use instead. Our washer and dryer do a good job on saddle pads (Tromm front loaders), and subsequent loads don't seem to be affected by any residual dirt, but I hate all the tiny hairs that end up in the lint catcher and all over the place afterward.
                                    MelanieC * Canis soloensis

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                                    • #58
                                      I wash my All Purpose pads at home in my washer - because they are small. However, I take my western pads to the laundramat and use the large commercial sized washers. I am careful to wipe out any remaining horse hair from the washers - both at home and at the laundramat.

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                                      • #59
                                        We have an Ariston all in one washer-dryer machine. I wash flymasks, saddlepads, wraps, tail guards, anything sheepskin, and boots in it. There’s never any hair left in the drum afterwards… maybe it’s because of the way the machine works?
                                        ----------------------------------------
                                        PSSM / EPSM and Shivers Forum
                                        http://pssm.xanthoria.com/
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                                        • #60
                                          Yes....and my barn even has a washer lol. Its just easier because I feel bad leaving my wet stuff out to dry at the barn. If I will be around for a while at the barn (like farrier day) I may wash a load at the barn then, but otherwise I bring stuff home to wash. I have a Kenmore (I think) frontload washer. I wash pretty much anything in it (including my back on track pad, sheets and blankets, tail bags, polos...) the only things I don't wash in it are items I hand wash like my Mattes and fleece lined boots. Those I do in the bathtub (our sinks aren't big enough). And my husband doesn't seem to care thankfully...aside from maybe all the clothes I have that are perpetually stained from various barn activites- I think that bugs him a bit
                                          My blog:

                                          RAWR

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