• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Pack of Wolves Kill Horse. Wolf Kill Authorized.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pack of Wolves Kill Horse. Wolf Kill Authorized.

    http://missoulian.com/news/state-and...cc4c03286.html

    Excerpt from article:

    Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials have authorized the killing of up to nine wolves south of Darby after recent attacks on a horse and a calf.

    The horse was killed within 200 yards of the Two Feathers Ranch manager's home Thursday night. The ranch is about 1 1/2 miles south of Darby.

    "Our favorite horse was killed by a wolf last night," said ranch owner Paul Shirley. "He was always the one who would come up for treats and we could give kids rides on him without any worry."

    The quarter horse was named Jack.

    "The wolves ran him through a fence and then tore his guts out," Shirley said. "It was terrible. ... These wolves are on our property most nights, and I'm terrified for my animals. I'm not sure what I'm supposed to do with my livestock."
    "No matter how well you perform there's always somebody of intelligent opinion who thinks it's lousy." - Laurence Olivier

  • #2
    i would be devastated if that happened to my horse. he was such a nice looking horse.
    i often hear the coyotes howling at night where i board. they have never come up to the barn, but the barn owner told me that he would see them wandering around in the back fields where they make hay.
    are coyotes dangerous?

    Comment


    • #3
      Coyotes are not dangerous. They are much smaller than wolves.

      I am very sorry about what happened to your horse. Was he/she turned out alone? It would help to prevent attacks like that if in a large herd.

      Also, is OP positive it was wolves? As sad as this story is wolves are becoming dangerously eliminated from those regions. I'm sure OP feels like getting rid of all of them but they are a vital part of our ecosystem.

      Again, I am very sorry about the horse. That is dreadful!
      Last edited by Ridewithnopride; May. 28, 2011, 02:49 PM. Reason: edited to add that Coyotes are not very dangerous to horses! Other smaller animals, yes.

      Comment


      • #4
        The coyotes where I live have gotten big. My friend came across one while on a walk and it was large and confrontational. She was able to back away safely and was not hurt. She was shooken up by it and thought maybe it was a female and her babies were nearby but she was surprised at the size of it. I don't think they would bother livestock but I think they have been snacking on the small dogs and cats around here as they appear to be well fed.
        Dawn

        Patience and Consistency are Your Friends

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Ridewithnopride View Post
          but they are a vital part of our ecosystem.
          Ummm, no.

          We got along fine for decades without them.

          Human predation can take their place and it is much more targeted and effectively managed.

          SSS

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ridewithnopride View Post
            Coyotes are not dangerous. They are much smaller than wolves.
            Um, yea, they are. One pack ran a VERY nice filly to the point if her breaking her leg.
            Horse sense is the thing a horse has which keeps it from betting on people.
            W. C. Fields

            Comment


            • #7
              Ridewithnopride, where do you live? Wolves are certainly not becoming dangerously eliminated from Idaho.

              Comment


              • #8
                Sorry have to adamently disagree with JER2 on this. Wolves ARE a vital part of our ecosystem and we do need apex predators in our ecosystem and I am not talking about humans. It's humans who have messed it up. We fail to recognize that we are within their territory and we are and must live among them, just as we should with all wildlife.

                Lest we forget we are not that far up on the food chain and we are not apex predator. Take away our guns, 4-wheelers and cars and we are prey. If we are hell bent on destroying any threatening apex predator (Like the wolf or saw sharks), this imbalance has consequences.

                If cattle ARE killed by wolves, and it's proven it was done by wolves, then these cattlemen are paid handsomly for the loss, trust me they are.

                Take a look at the world red list of endangered species or extinct species (flora and fauna) and it is a stark reminder how fragile a planet we live on.

                While no one will admit it wolves have returned to the Adirondacks of NYS, I welcome it. We have far to many white tail deer and coyotes (who get larger every year).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ridewithnopride View Post
                  Coyotes are not dangerous. They are much smaller than wolves.

                  I am very sorry about what happened to your horse. Was he/she turned out alone? It would help to prevent attacks like that if in a large herd.

                  Also, is OP positive it was wolves? As sad as this story is wolves are becoming dangerously eliminated from those regions. I'm sure OP feels like getting rid of all of them but they are a vital part of our ecosystem.

                  Again, I am very sorry about the horse. That is dreadful!
                  Just so you know since I see you're new here, this OP (Mike Matson) tends to post interesting links and videos here. I'm pretty sure it wasn't his horse that was attacked.
                  exploring the relationship between horse and human

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by classicsporthorses View Post
                    Sorry have to adamently disagree with JER2 on this. Wolves ARE a vital part of our ecosystem and we do need apex predators in our ecosystem and I am not talking about humans. It's humans who have messed it up. We fail to recognize that we are within their territory and we are and must live among them, just as we should with all wildlife.

                    Lest we forget we are not that far up on the food chain and we are not apex predator. Take away our guns, 4-wheelers and cars and we are prey. If we are hell bent on destroying any threatening apex predator (Like the wolf or saw sharks), this imbalance has consequences.

                    If cattle ARE killed by wolves, and it's proven it was done by wolves, then these cattlemen are paid handsomly for the loss, trust me they are.

                    Take a look at the world red list of endangered species or extinct species (flora and fauna) and it is a stark reminder how fragile a planet we live on.

                    While no one will admit it wolves have returned to the Adirondacks of NYS, I welcome it. We have far to many white tail deer and coyotes (who get larger every year).
                    Our ancestors eliminated large predators from most areas east of the Big Muddy for a very good reason, i.e., protection of livestock. That reason remains today.

                    I guess in NY where you surrender your rights to protect yourself and your family and your property to the State then you see yourself as "prey." In more primative and unsophisticated regions we still possess the means, and the will, to protect human life and property.

                    Good on the Montana authorities for shunning PC.

                    G.
                    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by classicsporthorses View Post
                      Sorry have to adamently disagree with JER2 on this. Wolves ARE a vital part of our ecosystem and we do need apex predators in our ecosystem and I am not talking about humans. It's humans who have messed it up. We fail to recognize that we are within their territory and we are and must live among them, just as we should with all wildlife.

                      Lest we forget we are not that far up on the food chain and we are not apex predator. Take away our guns, 4-wheelers and cars and we are prey. If we are hell bent on destroying any threatening apex predator (Like the wolf or saw sharks), this imbalance has consequences.

                      If cattle ARE killed by wolves, and it's proven it was done by wolves, then these cattlemen are paid handsomly for the loss, trust me they are.

                      Take a look at the world red list of endangered species or extinct species (flora and fauna) and it is a stark reminder how fragile a planet we live on.

                      While no one will admit it wolves have returned to the Adirondacks of NYS, I welcome it. We have far to many white tail deer and coyotes (who get larger every year).
                      You really believe all that and that cattlemen are paid handsomely?
                      Will that rancher be paid for his horse and calf and all others wolves kill that can't be documented?

                      I love those Easterns that live in nice places, well protected after centuries without serious predation and then want to tell others how they should live.
                      We have had the rare wolf come by here and would like to have the right to shoot it if it decides to make itself at home here and eat our cattle or horses or whatever is ours to care for and defend.
                      Luckily, they have been traveling ones and moved on to the mountains.

                      Do you also think mice in your pantry and crocoaches in your kitchen are part of the enviroment and you protect them?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A disclaimer: I watched this program almost a decade ago.

                        A show was on about wolves and how they are endangered in some areas. One rancher actually put dead cattle out on the edge of their property to welcome the wolves back.

                        What they found was that the wolves culled their herd for them, taking out the to old, sick and weak. I am assuming they lost some calves in the process, but apparently it was worth it for those ranchers.

                        I always though that was interesting considering how most ranchers feel about wolves.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Ajierene View Post
                          A disclaimer: I watched this program almost a decade ago.

                          A show was on about wolves and how they are endangered in some areas. One rancher actually put dead cattle out on the edge of their property to welcome the wolves back.

                          What they found was that the wolves culled their herd for them, taking out the to old, sick and weak. I am assuming they lost some calves in the process, but apparently it was worth it for those ranchers.

                          I always though that was interesting considering how most ranchers feel about wolves.
                          I wonder who made that documentary.
                          What you state doesn't make sense, because there are no cattle that need culling by wolves in herds.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ajierene View Post
                            A disclaimer: I watched this program almost a decade ago.

                            A show was on about wolves and how they are endangered in some areas. One rancher actually put dead cattle out on the edge of their property to welcome the wolves back.

                            What they found was that the wolves culled their herd for them, taking out the to old, sick and weak. I am assuming they lost some calves in the process, but apparently it was worth it for those ranchers.

                            I always though that was interesting considering how most ranchers feel about wolves.
                            Um... a real rancher is usually pretty good about culling out the old, sick and weak. That leaves the young for the wolves to cull for him.

                            Reintroducing the wolves into this modern day version of an ecosystem was animal abuse, all around. Lots of dogs, sheep, cows, elk, deer, coyotes and wolves have been killed-and the wolves are just doing what wolves do but there's just way too many of them. They've thrived beyond all expectations and now the system is top heavy-more predators than prey. The elk are knocked for a loop and if people keep trying to run ranchers out of business the wolves won't even have cows to eat any more. The sheep are already nearly gone. It was a Pandora's box that took off better than wolf biologists apparently anticipated.

                            Here, 200 miles east of Missoula, I would not expect any trouble at all from coyotes. But I sure wouldn't be telling the newspapers about any wolves that showed up on my place.
                            “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by cowboymom View Post
                              Um... a real rancher is usually pretty good about culling out the old, sick and weak. That leaves the young for the wolves to cull for him.

                              Reintroducing the wolves into this modern day version of an ecosystem was animal abuse, all around. Lots of dogs, sheep, cows, elk, deer, coyotes and wolves have been killed-and the wolves are just doing what wolves do but there's just way too many of them. They've thrived beyond all expectations and now the system is top heavy-more predators than prey. The elk are knocked for a loop and if people keep trying to run ranchers out of business the wolves won't even have cows to eat any more. The sheep are already nearly gone. It was a Pandora's box that took off better than wolf biologists apparently anticipated.

                              Here, 200 miles east of Missoula, I would not expect any trouble at all from coyotes. But I sure wouldn't be telling the newspapers about any wolves that showed up on my place.
                              A real rancher will not have let his cattle get too old, sick or weak anyway, except the very rare time an old cow just keeps finding an excuse to stick around and then she is getting extra care so she is not getting too weak.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I'm not too sure of your point there, Bluey. I don't know of any ranchers that can stop their cows from aging or getting sick. Too old to keep in the herd isn't always the same thing as too old to fight off a pack of wolves! And a cow can recover from illness without having the wolves take her out before the cure kicks in! lol My point was that a real rancher would make the cull decisions before letting a pack of wolves would do it.
                                Last edited by cowboymom; May. 28, 2011, 07:53 PM. Reason: typos
                                “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by cowboymom View Post
                                  I'm not too sure of your point there, Bluey. I don't know of any ranchers that can stop their cows from aging or getting sick. Too old to keep in the herd isn't always the same thing as too old to fight off a pack of wolves! And a cow can recover from illness without having the wolves take her out before the cure kicks in! lol My point was that a real rancher would make the cull decisions before letting a pack of wolves would do it.
                                  That was my point also.

                                  Letting wolves cull your herd, the way they go about bringing prey down, more than one and eating on them while still alive and some times leaving them once full, there half eaten and still alive some of them?

                                  We come across that with coyotes, would not be pleasant to see what the bigger predator wolves are can do.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I thought we were on the same page.

                                    When we ran sheep we dreaded when the coyotes were teaching the pups to hunt-despite our best efforts we would sometimes lose a bunch in a day, lambs and ewes brought down, chewed up and left to die while the coyotes moved on to another.

                                    Wolves are powerful weapons...not to be taken lightly. I feel bad for all involved when I hear about the wolves getting in trouble and the losses the ranchers get and then they get mired in red tape trying to follow through. I've heard those wolves howl when we were in the mountains and it's an amazing thing... but then weeks later I read in the paper that the pack I heard got into cattle and were shot by gov't officials. Just a mess, all around.
                                    “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      As a rule, I'm not afraid of coyotes at all.

                                      but a friend of my husband's was bitten on the heel by a coyote-as a teenager walking home through the fields and dropping into a cottonwood draw he stepped in the middle of a pack of coyotes feeding on something and they escorted him off the property; he got a bite on the foot in the process.
                                      “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Ajierene View Post
                                        A disclaimer: I watched this program almost a decade ago.

                                        A show was on about wolves and how they are endangered in some areas. One rancher actually put dead cattle out on the edge of their property to welcome the wolves back.

                                        What they found was that the wolves culled their herd for them, taking out the to old, sick and weak. I am assuming they lost some calves in the process, but apparently it was worth it for those ranchers.

                                        I always though that was interesting considering how most ranchers feel about wolves.
                                        That was the man that developed the Beefmaster. Love his story using the natural environment to cull. Awesome!

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X